Skip to main content

Full text of "Movieland. (Vol. 4, Feb. 1946-Jan. 1947)"

See other formats
















Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 



Packard Campus 
for Audio Visual Conservation 
www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 








- 


































- . 
































. 














•» 





















































































































































• WINGING DOWN A SKI SLOPE, you 
want a hair-do that stays put. ‘‘So 
fasten your hair at the nape of your 
neck with a barrette,” advises Shari, 
“and comb under into a smooth page¬ 
boy.” No other shampoo . . . only 
Drene with Hair Conditioning action 
... will make your hair look so lovely. 


Wonderful Hair-dos for Vour Winter Week-End 

• GLAMOUR BY FIRELIGHT. . .“Change to something romantic for evening,” 
Shari says. “Sweep up your hair and arrange in four or five long shining cutis.’', 
For that wonderful shining-smooth look, follow Shari’s example and be a Direhe 
Girl. So simple yet really dramatic! 




Sh 


a m poo ivi 


ith 


Hair Conditioning Action - 


leaves ^ourhair 


so lustrous, yet so 


easy to manage. 


Queen of the winter scene with sparkling hair! 

All aglow in the sunlight or firelight. 

That’s Drene-lovely hair. 

Cover Girl Shari Herbert shows you 
these exciting hair-dos to go with the things 
you’ll do and the clothes you’ll wear 
on a gay winter week-end. 
“Changing your hair style is part of the fun,” 
says Shari. “And your hair is so easy to fix 
after a Drene wash. This wonderful shampoo 
with Hair Conditioning action 
leaves hair so smooth and easy to manage.” 
You’ll love the way Drene brings out 
all the gleaming beauty of your hair . . . 
as much as 33% more brilliance than any soap. 

Drene is not a soap shampoo. 

It never leaves any dull dingy film on hair 
the way all soaps do. 

Fashion models, like Shari Herbert, 
are always so smartly groomed. 

No unsightly dandruff, not when 

you’re a Drene Girl! Start 
today. Use Drene Shampoo with 
Hair Conditioning action or ask 
your beauty shop to use it. 


©C1B 705031 

h> % 







LIGHT UP YOUR LIPS FOR LOVE 

WHEN YOU'RE REACHING FOR A STAR.. . when heaven and earth are bound into one 
romantic timeless interlude of love . •. when willing lips accept betrothal, let Floress portray 
that inner radiance! Let this utterly different radiant lipstick express the miracle of your happiest 

moments! If the cry in your heart dims the brilliance of the heavens, send now for your trial sizes ot radiant 
indelible Floress! At a few Drug and Department Stores—but so new, your cosmetic counter may not yet have it. 


CHECK 

SHADES 

□ Pink 

Passion 

□ Neon 
Red 

□ Scarlet 
Sequin 

□ Twilight 
Fuchsia 

□ Blue 
Flame 


Floress, Dept. 1-B, 215 N. Michigan, Chicago 1, III. 

*In Canada: Floress, Dept. 1-B, 22 College St., Toronto 

Send me two trial sizes (a full month's supply) of fabulous FLORESS, the 
fluorescent, lovelight lipstick, in shades checked at left. I enclose 25c in coin to cover 
all charges, including tax. Check here Q if you wish all 5 shades for 50c. 


Check here for 

□ REGULAR $1 SIZE 
in beautiful all metal 
brass swivel case. 

□ I enclose $1.20 tax 
included. 

□ Send C.O.D. $1.20 Plus 
Postage. 


NAME 

(Print Plainly) 

i 

i 

i 

i 

highlights by day—glow with 
bewitching fire at night. 

CITY 

ZONE STATE 

i 

i 

— i 

Satisfaction guaranteed or money bock. 


♦In Canada: Large Size is $1.35—C. O. D.'s Accepted 



The Fluorescent 
Lipstick, unlike ordinary lipsticks, 
contains Florium, the magic that 
makes each shade shimmer with satiny 


3 











★ 
★ 
★ 
* 
★ 
• ★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
A 
k 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
★ 
•k 
k 



It was a best-seller...a Reader's Digest 
classic... a Book of the Month. And 
now it’s The Picture Of The Year. 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

It’s W. L. White’s “They Were Expend¬ 
able’’—carved out of some of the most 
dramatic events of all time. 



This is M-G-M’s heart-stinging story 
of some of the most heroic headlines 
of recent years. 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

The story of “Brick”, who loved a boat; 
of “Rusty”, who loved a girl. 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

Robert Montgomery (back on the 
screen after his war-years with Uncle 
Sam’s Navy) is magnificent as “Brick”, 
who’d rather command a PT-boat than 
a battleship. The part’s a natural for 
the star who was skipper on a PT-boat 
when they were shooting for keeps. 
★ ★ ★ ★ 

John Wayne is “Rusty”, who scoffs at 
the “sea-going mousetraps”. But that 
was before the fighting started! 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

There’s a tremendous thrill in watching 
those suicidal “sea-scooters” in action! 
The thrill of battle, of terrible peril. 
And a surge of pride that will quicken 
the beat of your heart. 



There’s a thrill, too, in the romance 
between the hard-bitten PT-boat Com¬ 
mander and the Army nurse. Lovely 
Donna Reed makes a perfect “Sandy”, 
dungareed angel of mercy who tends 
wounds and steals hearts. 


★ ★ ★ ★ 

There’s a gripping sense of realism in 
“They Were Expendable”—evidence of 
the directorial deftness of Captain John 
Ford, U.S.N.R., the expert screen play 
of Comdr. Frank Wead, U.S.N. (Ret.), 
the excellence of the action photog¬ 
raphy. Cliff Reid is associate producer. 


★ ★ ★ ★ 

Jack Holt, Ward Bond and a consum¬ 
mate cast back up the stars with 
stellar performances. 

★ ★ ★ 

The screen can offer no greater - ' 
thrill than this story of gallant 
men and women who never 
expected to return. “They 
Were Expendable.” 

★ ★ 

We salute them. — Jiexx 



' 4 


mm 




m 


M ® ® U 0. DO fil 


VOL. 4 


FEItR(JAKY, 1046 


NO. 1 


StvUeA 

27. Who’s New (Glenn Langan) 
By Kay Proctor 

28.Little Audrey (Totter) 

By Helen Louise Walker 

31.The House of Morgan 

(Dennis) 

By Rilla Page Palmborg 

33.This Is Myself (Rosalind 

Russell) 

36.Blyth Spirit (Ann) 

By Dorothy B. Haas 

38.Music Takes a Bow 

By Gertrude Shanklin 

42 . Maddest Romance in Town 
(Bill Eythe) 

By Marcia Daughtrey 

46.Getting a Line on Leslie 

(Joan) 

By Mickell Novak 

48.Diary of a Doting Dad 

By Brian Donlevy 

50.Laughter Is a Serious 

Business 
By Gene Schrott 

I 


'lPmt%a£&b 

27. Glenn Langan 

30.Dennis Morgan 

32.Rosalind Russell 

37.Ann Blyth 

39 .Jose Iturbi 

57.Ingrid Bergman 

0 ?e<ztcvte& 

16.This Was Hollywood 

18.So Proudly We Hail 

44.Sandra Predicts 

By Alice L. Tildesley 

52.Be Glad You’re Tall 

By Edith Head 

57.Reading from Writing 

By Helen King 

6.Inside Hollywood 

By Fredda Dudley 

12. MovielaNd’s Crossword 

Puzzle 

14 Your Problem and Mine 

By Jane Wyman 
22 Movieland’s New Picture 
Guide 

24.Behind the Scenes 

By Shirley Cook 

34.Pictures in Production 

54.Words of Music 

By Jill Warren 


DORIS CLINE, Editor 

PEG NICHOLS, Assistant Editor 

BOB BECKER, Art Editor 


HELEN LIMKE, Hollywood Editor 
BILL DUDAS, Staff Photographer 
ROBERT CROSSETT, Ass’t Art Ed. 


MOVIELAND, published monthly by Movieland, Inc., at Dunellen N T Advprticin 
ed,tonal offices, 535 Fifth Avenue New York 17,’N. V. Hollywood’editorial office 9 26 
Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles 46, Cal. fonua. Chicago advertising office: 333 No Michi¬ 
gan Avenue, Chicago, III. \ ol. 4, No. I, February, 1946. Entered as second rla« iY.5" 
December IS, 1942, at the post office at Dunellen, N. J, under the Act of March 3 1879 
Pnce 15c a copy Subscription price 1*1.80 in the United States and $1.80 in Canada 
J.opyright 1946 by Movieland, Inc. /The publishers accept no responsibility f^r un 
'Solicited manuscripts, and all manuscripts should be accompanied by a stamped self 
addressed envelope. Printed in the United States of America. Price 15c a copy in Cantda 
MEMBER AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS 

















































(BECAUSE THEY JUST FINISHED A BIG PICTURE) 





Robert Montgomery (don’t you feel 
like shaking his hand and saying: 
"Welcome home, Bob!”) plays "Brick," 
in love with thirty fighting tons of 
wood and steel, a PT boat. John Wayne 
is "Rusty”... afraid of only one thing in- 
the world, losing Sandy. Lovely Donna 
Reed is Sandy, the nurse who heals 


heroes’ wounds, and steals their hearts. 

Here’s the exciting picturization of 
the terrific best-seller that has taken 
America by storm, "They Were Ex¬ 
pendable.” Acclaimed by the reading 
public as a Readers Digest thriller, 



then as a Book-of-the-Month ... and 
now as an M-G-M film destined to be 
called the Picture of the Year. Here’s 
roaring action . . . suspense with a 
wallop... flaming romance as real as 
flesh and blood can make it. The 
screen can offer no greater thrill than 
"They Were Expendable.” 


ilf*GWW ptedenls 

THEY WERE EXPENDABLE 

ROBERT MONTGOMERY- JOHN WAYNE 


with DONNA REED . jack holt . ward bond 

A JOHN FORD PRODUCTION • BASED ON THE BOOK BY WILLIAM L. WHITE 
Screen Play by FRANK WEAD, COMDR. U. S. N. (RET.) • Associate Producer CLIFF REID 
DIRECTED BY JOHN FORD, CAPTAIN, U. S. N. R. 

A METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURE 








WU.TOO. CAN ENJOY 

'extra'advantage of 
this higher type 

(Mitmate (J&ftukMte 



Greaseless Suppository Gives 
Hours of Continuous Medication 


Today the modem woman who ‘is 
wise’—no longer uses weak, home¬ 
made mixtures for intimate feminine 
hygiene. 

Nor does she resort to overstrong 
harmful poisons, because Science has 
given her a higher type of antiseptic 
cleanliness — powerfully germicidal 
yet harmless — and so much easier, 
daintier and convenient to use — 
called zonitors! 


So Powerful Yet So Harmless 
Positively No Burn 

Zonitors are greaseless, stainless snow- 
white vaginal suppositories. They 
are not the type which melt quickly 
away. Instead, Zonitors release pow¬ 
erful germicidal properties and con¬ 
tinue to do so for hours—thus giving 
you hours of continuous medication. 
Yet Zonitors are positively non-burn¬ 
ing, non-irritating, non-poisonous. 

Zonitors actually destroy offending 
odor and kill every germ they touch. 
You know it’s not always possible to 
contact all the germs in the tract but 
you can be sure that Zonitors imme¬ 
diately kill every reachable germ and 
keep them from multiplying. 

So easy to carry while away from 
home—so easy to use at home! All 
drugstores. 



FREE: Mall this coupon today for 
free booklet sent In plain wrap¬ 
per. Reveals frank Intimate facts. 
Zonitors, Dept. ZM-26, 370 Lexington 
Avenue, New York 17, N. Y. 


Name_ 

Address_ 

City— _State. 


Betty's chief henchman is her siandin, a 
popular girl named Angie Blue. Not long 
ago, after a series of practical jokes planned 
by Betty and executed by Angie, Dick and 
his gang conceived of a revenge. They 
caught Angie one day, tied her to a pre¬ 
pared post on the set, then armed them¬ 
selves (six marksmen) with cream pies. Dick 
had secured a sword from the property de¬ 
partment and was acting as master of cere¬ 
monies. After Angie was blind-folded, Dick 
shouted, "Ready!" (Angie screamed. Hermes 
Pan, 20th dance director standing on the 
sidelines, screamed with laughter.) 

"Aim!" (Angie's screams were very real. 
Hermes Pan was almost apoplectic with 
mirth.) 

"Fire!" The squad'swung rapidly, scored 
six easy hits on Mr. Pan. Angie went right 
on screaming. 

SUIT YOURSELF: 

One of the surprises of marriage, to the 
average girl, is the fact that during courtship 
a man appears to regard every garment a 
girl wears as the ultimate in high style and 
stunning good taste; whereas, when the 
honeymoon is over, certain alterations in type 
or tone of dress become imperative. To wit; 
June Allyson has always been addicted to 
suits, and her new husband conceded that 
he found them to be enchanting on June. 

However, for June's recent birthday, he 
tactfully enticed her to the salon of Howard 
Greer, resourceful dress designer . . . and 
ordered SIX frocks for her. "Your suits are 
smart for daytime year," he grinned, "but I 
thought . . ." 

Said his wife, "Sir, you are a tactful gentle¬ 
man and a perfect husband. Wait until you 
see me in that blue number, or the red, or 
. . . goodness, but marriage is wonderful!" 

DENNIS MURPHY DEPARTMENT: 

This department's favorite gamin is again 
making history. Now nearing the age of 
seven. Denny is learning the art of baseball 
from his father. The other evening George 
and Denny were playing in the backyard 
when Denny connected with one of his 
father's curves, knocked the ball over the 
garden wall and crashed it through a neigh¬ 
bor's plate glass window. 

After proper negotiations, a pair of crest¬ 
fallen Murphys returned to their own library. 


where they explained the fluke to Mrs. Mur¬ 
phy. Said George, "It was one of those things 
that you can't control—a high fly." 

Observed Denny, "I should have soaked 
the ball in DDT." 

PREVIEW: 

Best story to circulate in Hollywood after 
the Photographer's Ball was told by Gaza 
Korvin. He and his clever wife, Helana, 
planned to go in Tom Sawyer costume. 
Gaza donned a pair of blue jeans, very 
faded, very weary, and a plaid shirt that 
had been repeatedly patched for the occa¬ 
sion. Helana is in the feminine equivalent 
of Poverty Flat the Day Before Payday. So 
they arrived at Ciro's at the fashionable 
hour and were met by Gene (the maitre 
d’hotel) with an expression of genteel as¬ 
tonishment. 

"The Photographers' Ball?" said Gaza. 

"One week from tonight," said Gene. 

EL SCORCHO: 

Betty awakened first and sniffed. Calling 
across to the somnolent figure on the other 
twin bed, she said. "Ted, do you smell 
smoke?" 

Mr. Briskin stirred, sat up, leaped out of 
bed, into slippers and robe. "I'll say I do," 
he yelled as he and his negligee'd wife 
made for the kitchen. By that time the 
maid was filling a bucket at the kitchen 
faucet. She passed it to Betty, Betty rushed 
it to Ted, Ted tossed water on the side of 
the house. The next bucketful was tossed 
on the roof, also the third, etc., etc. Even¬ 
tually the brigade quelled the flames. 

Damage was a hole in the roof and a 
scorched section of the kitchen and break¬ 
fast room walls. The fire had started, appar¬ 
ently, in a stack of newspapers that had 
been piled in anticipation of a Boy Scout 
collection. 

When the excitement had subsided, Ted 
Briskin doubled with laughter. Not three 
feet away was coiled forty feet of garden 
hose, already attached to a faucet. The 
fire could have been put out, s ana bucket 
brigade, in about thirty seconds. 

FOOT OF THE TROUBLE: 

This is somewhat late for a combination 
Hallowe'en-Christmas story, but this yam is 
really worth repeating. Favorite gift of 



s • > • v* ■ ■ V. U '""'VI* WH miuc IV yi un ivir». L/Oily Dll 

spite of N. Y. gossipers who scream, " 'Tain't so!' 


Above, with actor Frank Moi 
















I 


JACK HALEY 


You’ll see all the hilari¬ 
ous stunts that make 
America Roar from coast- 
to-coast every week! 


py on ihe air..* 
on ihe sex gsQ 


Because Paramount Has Doubled 
The Fun By Adding The Radio Favorites 
of 50 Million Listeners, Plus 
Famous Screen Stars! 

a r 


starring 


Jack Haley 
Helen Walker 
Rudy Vallee 
Ozzie Nelson 
Philip Reed 


with 


The Vagabonds 
Bob Graham • Roy Atwell 


Art Linkletter 


and the 


People Are Funny 
Radio Show 


Guest artist 


Frances Langford 

Produced and Directed by SAM WHITE 
Screenplay by Maxwell Shane, David Lang 
Original Story by David Lang 
A Pine-Thomas Production 
A Paramount Picture 









A Sfxtefter Woref 


Stronger Grip 


. . . Watch your "Good-looks 


Dana Andrews this Christmas was a pair of 
all-wool Argyle plaid sox. It is the only 
pair he has, and it replaced . . . 

To begin at the beginning: if you have 
tried to buy, for yourself or as a gift, a pair 
of wool argyle plaid sox during the past 
year, you know that the item is unobtain¬ 
able. Dana had one precious pair. On 
Hallowe'en afternoon, Mary washed them 
and put them on sock stretchers in the 
laundry. That night their outer gate bell 
rang, and David (Dana's twelve-year-old 
son) said, "It's probably a bunch of kids 
from school. They said they'd be around 
tonight, ringing doorbells and saying 'Trick 
or Treat.' " 

Sure enough, it was a group of David's 
classmates, so Dana admitted them. What 
he didn't know was that every bobby soxer 
for miles around had congregated with the 
legitimate Hallowe'en celebrants; this gang 
simply gushed through the house spreading 
into every room, shouting for Dana. When 
they left, Dana discovered that they had 
taken his one and only pair of argyle sox 
from the laundry. 

A trick that wasn't a treat. 

TRICKY STUFF: 



Quality Manufacturers for Over 50 years 

BOB PINS HAIR PINS SAFETY PINS 
SNAP FASTENERS STRAIGHT PINS 
HOOKS & EYES HOOK & EYE TAPES 

SANITARY BELTS 


Score" go up and up when 
you use DeLong Bob Pins to 
give your hair-do that smooth, 
new uncluttered look. 

It’s the “Stronger Qrip' in 
DeLong Bob Pins that makes 
them so different from bob 
pins of the wishy-washy type... 

Stronger Grip 

r Won’t Slip Out 


Jane Powell, MGM thrush, has taken three 
cat collars (bright leather, set with bells), cut 
them down to size, and is wearing them as 
bracelets. She started it during the Christmas 
holidays, and the stunt created so much 
excitement that she has continued to wear 
the tinklers. 

Lana Turner has been seen around town 
in a white, hand-knitted sweater with a 
high, round neck and cap sleeves. The yoke 
is embroidered with gold bugle beads, con¬ 
verting the garment into a stunning evening 
blouse. With this, Lana wears her gold 
coin bracelets. She has assembled the coins 
from those mailed to her by service men 
stationed all over the world; gold-plated and 
linked, they have been soldered to a heavy 
antique gold bracelet that jingles as she 
talks merrily along . . . with gestures. The 
earrings she wears with the outfit are an¬ 
tique gold lyres. 

NOCTURNE ABOUT IS FAIR PLAY: 

As everyone knows, Mr. George Sanders 
is a gentleman of the old school, inasmuch 
as he believes that woman's place is in the 
home—or better yet, the harem. "Nocturne," 


his current picture, is being produced by 
that able woman executive, Joan Harrison— 
thereby giving rise to a piquant situation. 
Miss Harrison, a shrewd operator, made an 
appointment with Mr. Sanders, shook hands, 
and promptly told the rapidly melting seraglio 
advocate a number of salty stories learned 
from a seafaring relative. Mr. Sanders' 
laughter boomed forth; Mr. Sanders' friend¬ 
ship became obvious. 

"Nocturne" will probably be one of the 
pictures of the year. 

DOUBLE THREAT: 

Remember the lanky adolescent in "To¬ 
gether Again" who made a pass at Irene 
Dunne? And the "Holy Cow!" beanpole who 
played opposite Shirley Temple in "Kiss 
And Tell"? His name is Jerome Courtland 
and he is currently a sergeant, stationed 
with the army of occupation in Korea. 

That Cojo's talent is not confined to acting 
is proved by the fact that some friends of 
his family were complaining one night about 
being unable to get a pair of carved sea¬ 
horses to affix to the doors of their station 
wagon as a gag. Without a word, Cojo 
left the room, repaired to his coping saw 
in the garage, and returned with two perfect 
seahorses painted green. His one request 
for Christmas this year was a set of pastels 
with which to sketch the Korean scene. His 
friend, Walt Disney, has bandied word about 
that if Cojo grows tired of acting when he 
gets home, he can always come out to Bur¬ 
bank and assist with the further adventures 
of Donald Duck. 

THUMB BEAUTY: 

Notice to pre-dawn Beverly Hills motorists: 

Ihe vivacious blonde whom you have been 
kind enough to drive to 20th Century-Fox on 
frequent occasions—is Carole Landis. 

Although Carole is settled in her new home, 
she hasn't a telephone, and won't have for 
some time. When telephoning has been abso¬ 
lutely essential, she has hopped to the home 
of a neighbor and begged the favor. But 
when she emerged one morning at five A.M. 
and couldn't start her car, she lacked the 
courage required to drag a neighboring 
householder from sleep. So she hitchhiked 
to the studio. 

The next morning, and the next, she had 

(Continued on page 20) 



10 


News item: Lana Turner and Bob Hutton. 


N. Y. honeymooners: Mr. and Mrs. L. Ballard. 











TO 0133201“ 


kegs toes 


°at ion's 


STARRING 


o^iwiin/lll | IBtinii.rfl 

DIRECTED BY PRODUCED BY 

VICTOR FRANCEN 
JOHN LITEL 

ORIGINAL SCREEN PLAY BY ALAN LEMAY AND W. R. BURNETT • MUSIC BY MAX STEINER 


s’z'cud dies' mirziTr davidIutleb Robert buckner 




“A woman’s as good 
as her reputation ... g 
and a man is as good 
as his aim!” 


n 
































It's All So Easy! Write today for big Free 
Catalog (and Decorating Guide) that tells how 
your materials are picked up at your door 
at our expense by Express or Freight and 
shipped to the Olson Factory, where . . . 


12 



Chicago New York S. Frisco 


REE Catalog //; Colors 


OLSON RUG CO. R-25, Chicago 41, III. 

, Please mail the Olson Catalog FREE to: 


By the Olson Process we sterilize, shred, 
sort, merge material of all kinds — reclaim 
the valuable wools, etc., then bleach, picker, 
card, spin,re-dye and weave deep-textured 

New Reversible 
BROADLOOM RUGS 

in sizes up to 16 feet without 
seams, any length, in: 

Solid Colors Early American 
Tone en Tone Florals, Ovals 
Tweeds Oriental Designs 

FACTORY-to-YOU! We 

guarantee to please, or 
pay for materials. Over 2 
million customers. We never 
employ Agents or sell thru 
stores. Our 72d year. 


Mail Coupon or lc 

Postcard for this 
beautiful 40 page 
Olson Book of rugs 
and model rooms. 


!NAME_ 

S ©ORC. 

I ADDRESS__I 84 . 5 

I 

| TOWN_STATE_ 



ACROSS 


1. Oliver’s movie partner 
5. "Sam” in "The Souther¬ 
ner” 

10. Army runabout 

14. Van in "Week-end at the 
Waldorf” 

15. "Love, ----- and Good¬ 
bye” 

16. "Irene” in "Why Girls 
Leave Home” (anag.) 

17. Like a wing 

18. "Paula” in "Over 21” 

19. "Bunny Smith” in "Week¬ 
end at the Waldorf” (anag.) 

20. "Along Came Jones” 

22. Cub reporter is - - - - - role 
in "Week-end at the 
Waldorf” 

24. "Rill Lambeth” is. 

role in "West of the 
Pecos” 

26. News Review (abbr.) 

27. Blanche Yurka in “The 
Southerner” 

29. "Deborah Brown” in 
"Uncle Harry” 

31. Norwegian 

36. Gale’s grandfather in "For¬ 
ever Yours” 

39. "Archie” in "Duffy’s 
Tavern” (inits.) 

40. "Ma Mott” in "None but 
the Lonely Heart” 

41. "Suzanne” is - - - - role in 
"West of the Pecos” 
(anag.) 

42. He’s in "She Wouldn’t Say 
Yes” 

43. Conrad Nagel’s daughter 
in "Forever Yours” 

44. "Elsa” in "The House on 
92nd Street” 

45. "Ruth Hartley” in "Pride 
of the Marines” (inits.) 


46. '‘Judge Hardy” is ----- - 
popular role 

47. Timber and shade trees 

48. Wheys of milk 

50. "Martinius” in "Our Vines 
Have Tender Grapes” 

51. School principal in "Girl 
of the Limberlost” (inits.) 

53. Wanders 

56. Joan Crawford 

61. "Melissa Frake” in "State 
Fair” 

65. Locale of "Lifeboat” 

66. Anagram for Miss Garbo 

68. Aspiring to be artistic 

69. The Fleagle - - - - is in 
"Murder, He Says” 

70. Lake in Finland 

71. Orson’s mate 

72. Cognizances . 

73. Ancient Irish tribal groups 

74. Author of "Blithe Spirit” 
(anag.) 

DOWN 

1. Author of "Major Bar¬ 
bara” 

2. Far (prefix) 

3. "Nona” in "Uncle Harry” 
(anag.) 

4. "The ----- Star” 

5. Abel's daughter in "Kiss 
and Tell” 

6. '"Aladdin” in "A Thousand 
and One Nights” 

7. "It Happened - - - Night” 

8. "Honky --” 

9. "Lucy” in "Don Juan 
Quilligan” 

10. "Julie Adams” in "Rhap¬ 
sody in Blue” 

11. "Jim Riley” in "Crime, 
Inc.” (anag.) 


12. Rosemary - - - - (anag.) 

13. Bob and Rags in "Her 
Highness and the Bellboy” 

21. Detective in "The Hidden 
Eye” (inits.) 

23. "Williams” in "Men in 
Her Diary” 

25. B movie that makes a hit 

27. In music, directions to 
change 

28. Disconcert 

30. "Teen - - -” 

32. Peggy's grandpop in "On 
Stage Everybody 

33. Swiss and French river 

34. "Mary” is - - - - role in 
"Gentle Annie” (anag.) 

35. "Desire Under the - - - -” 

36. Somalis of eastern Africa 

37. Opera singer in "Going My 
Way” 

38. More erose 

42. - - Miserables" 

46. "Sue is - - - - role in "Mid¬ 
night Manhunt” 

49. The Captain in "Story of 
G.I. Joe- 

52. Goddess of vegetation 

54. Sumatra, Java, Borneo, etc. 
(abbr.) 

55. Complication 

56. Cecil Kellaway in "Love 
Letters” 

57. "-of the Dead” 

58. Anagram for Miss Horne 

59. "Arnold” is - - - - role in 
"Lady on a Train” 

60. "Lee Diamond” in "Pride 
of the Marines” 

62. The Andrews Sisters 

63. Diminutive suffix 

64. "Molly” in "On Stage 
Everybody” 

67. Anagram for Mr. O’Brien 


(For Solution See Page 86) 


































































































































RKo radio pictures 

presents 


RHONDA FLEMING 
• EISA UNCHESTER 
' RY production 

fOBERT SIODMAK 

by MCI Dl NELLI 

Wold." b » fTHEl UNA WH(Ta 


7%e cwM-wtIb&tf 


Hollywood called this story 
“impossible to produce.” Such 
mounting suspense...such daring 
emotional power...such difficult 
starring roles. Yet, here it is, 
in all its flawless fascination! 


13 









ORDER BY MAIL FROM HOLLYWOOD! 



Best suit "buy" for your money! Looks SO 
expensive... flatters your figure! Made of 
Cohama’s beautiful “Frost-Stripe’’. .. a 
firm, suit-weight rayon that looks like wool. 
Smart fitted waistband, "shirt” cuffs, kick- 
pleated skirt. Sizes 10 to 20. 

Black Brown Navy 

Only $ 10.98 plus postage 




SEND NO MONEY—WE MAIL C. O. D_ 

Satisfaction guaranteed, or your money 
refunded. 

serry co-ed ofHouywoov 

Dept. 390, 6253 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 
I-1 

BETTY CO-ED OF HOLLYWOOD, DEPT.390 | 
j 6253 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif, j 
J Please send mo “Suit Sensation" o» 110.98 plus postage. . 
I Black □ Brown □ Navy ’□ 

(Mark 1st & 2nd Color Choice) | 
I Sizes 10 1J 14 IS 18 20 (Circle size wonted) j 


NAME.... 

ADDRESS. 



14 


CITY. 


ZONE.STATE. 



YOUR 
PROBLEM 
and MINE 


Happy days again for Jane 
now that Ronald Reagan is 
out of the Army. His next 
is the "Will Rogers" role. 


Dear Miss Wyman: 

Although I am not yet sixteen years 
old, I have to confess that I smoke. Yes, 
it all started with a group of us kids 
thinking it would be fun to try smoking, 
and now I smoke about half a pack a 
day and can’t quit. 

Oh, Miss Wyman, I would give anything 
not to have started this—my parents would 
be furious if they knew about it—but I 
can’t quit even though I want to. 

Dolores S. 


Dear Dolores: 

It is needless to point out to you the 
foolishness of a youngster like you in¬ 
dulging in cigarettes. Smoking is a 
habit that many people much older than 
you are have spent long hours regret¬ 
ting the day they first started. 

However, it seems to me that there is 
certainly no reason why you can not 
quit, since you obviously have not been 
smoking long. With you the hazard is 
mostly mental, and I am sure that you 
can pull yourself in hand long enough 
to forego cigarettes, at least for a couple 
more years. 

Incidentally, perhaps the current 
shortage is a blessing in disguise for 
you! 

JANE WYMAN 


Dear Miss Wyman: 

I am nineteen years old and have fallen 
in love with a man of thirty-six years. 

He admits that he loves me, but still he 
refuses to marry me because of the differ¬ 
ence in our ages. He keeps telling me I 
will regret it and will fall in love with 
another man after we are married. But I 
love him a great deal. 

Please advise me. 

Jerry 


Dear Jerry: 

A difference of 17 years in age is 
quite a bridge to gap, perhaps not so 
much now as in later years. However, 
there is no set rule that can be applied, 
for so many considerations enter into 
the matter. You may be very mature 
for your age, whereas your friend may 
be very youthful for his; you may have 
such a community of common interests 
that age will be relegated into the back¬ 
ground. I know of happy marriages, 
and also unhappy ones, under these 
circumstances, it all depends upon you. 

What I cannot understand is the at¬ 
titude of your friend. If he had no idea 
of marriage, why did he go with you 
and encourage you to fall in love with 
him? He should have thought of his 
scruples against such a marriage before 
he got you emotionally involved. 

JANE WYMAN 

(Continued on page 94) 








































Anita 


LOUISE - lilt ESMOND * tdgar BBCHMW* 


Screenplay by Wilfrid H. Pettittand Melvin Levy • Directed by GEORGE SHERMAN and HENRY LEVIN • Produced by LEONARD S. PICKER and CLIFFORD SANFORTH 


15 











Glamour coat for rain or shine! 
Tailored of Mountain Cloth, a 
cotton gabardine that's water- 
repellant because it's treated 
with Aridex. Sizes 10 to 18. 


Natural, Black, Red, Light Blue or Olivo 


Send ne money! We fill all C. O. D. orders prompt* 
ly. Or, if you prefer, enclose check, cash or money 
order for $10 plus 10c postage and save C. O. D. 
charges. In Missouri add 2 % soles lax. 

SALLE ANN, Box 700,1409 Washington, St. Louis 3, Mo. 

Send your "Rain Beau" raincoat $1Q each plus 
10c postage. Ring your size: 10, 12, 14, 16, 18. 
Check first and second color choice: 

□ Natural □ Black □ Red 
□ Light Blue □ Olive 
NAME__ 


ADDRESS. 
CITY_ 


.STATE. 



ONE YEAR AGO: Dick Powell 
turned tough-guy in “Murder, My 
Sweet” . . . June Allyson and Peter 
Lawford dating . . . Ditto Deanna Dur¬ 
bin and Felix Jackson . . . Susan Hay¬ 
ward and Jess Barker parented twin 
boys ... “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” 
brought raves from the critics . . . 
Lawrence Tierney became a star in 
“Dillinger” . . . Bonita Granville de¬ 
cided to do a show in New York . . . 
Artie Shaw and Ava Gardner an item 
. . . “The Picture of Dorian Gray” had 
the town talking . . . Fred Astaire 
losing checker game after checker 
game to Gregory Peck . . . George 
Sanders taking piano lessons . . . The 
Bogart and Bacall romance blazing . . . 

FIVE YEARS AGO: Judy Garland 
and Dave Rose planning marriage . . . 
Jackie Cooper and Bonita Granville 
going steady . . . Joan Crawford de¬ 
clared she was no longer vitally inter¬ 
ested in her screen career . . . Reggie 
Gardiner and Hedy Lamarr insepa¬ 
rable . . . Anne Shirley and John 
Payne welcomed the stork . . . Vivian 
Leigh was “Lady Hamilton” . . . 
Deanna Durbin engaged to Vaughn 
Paul . . . Gin-rummy swept Holly¬ 
wood . . . The Myrna Loy-Arthur 
Hornblow marriage on the rocks . . . 
Veronica Lake was a sensation in “I 
Wanted Wings” . . . Alice Faye un¬ 
happy over her broken marriage to 
Tony Martin. Tony and Lana Turner 
were romancing . . . Mickey Rooney 


admitted he couldn’t get Linda Dar¬ 
nell off his mind . . . The Rosalind 
Russell-Fred Brisson romance looked 
serious . . . Charlie Chaplin definitely 
stated there would be no divorce be¬ 
tween him and Paulette Goddard . . . 
Everyone talking about Katharine 
Hepburn’s performance in “The Phil¬ 
adelphia Story” . . . Olivia De Havil- 
land dating Gene Markey . . . Ginger 
Rogers was “Kitty Foyle” . . . Vic 
Mature followed Betty Grable to New 
York, but her heart belonged to Artie 
Shaw . . . 


TEN YEARS AGO: Robert Taylor 
supported Janet Gaynor in “Small 
Town Girl” . . . Rumors of a marriage 
between Dick Powell and Joan Blon- 
dell persisted . . . Rita Hayworth was 
starlet Rita Cansino . . . Jean Harlow 
and Bill Powell dating . . . Marlene 
Dietrich and Clifton Webb constantly 
together . . . “The Country Doctor” 
starred the Dionne quintuplets . . . 
Shirley Temple having trouble with 
loosening baby teeth . . . Clark Gable 
separated from his first wife . . . Bette 
Davis built her New England farm¬ 
house in Connecticut . . . Claudette 
Colbert married Dr. Joel Pressman 
. . . All Hollywood was playing 
“Words and Endings” . . . Barbara 
Stanwyck divorcing Frank Fay 
Errol Flynn was hailed an exciting 
new discovery as “Captain Blood” . 
Gene Raymond and Jeanette Mac¬ 
Donald said it wasn’t serious. 


16 


37 SALLE ANN SHOPS IN TEXAS, 
LOUISIANA, AAISSOURI, ILLINOIS 















The Cheat Stow- and IDwc&z of "Woman in the Window"... 



\ . 


i mSk^' 

\ % fjfif ' - 


does to men 
can only end 

in Mu/udei! 


| it 

■ 


A DIANA PRODUCTION 
Produced and Directed by 
FRITZ LANG 
A UNIVERSAL RELEASE 


JESS BARKER • MARGARET LINDSAY • ROSALIND IVAN • SAMUEL S. HINDS 

Based on the novel “La Chienne” Screenplay by DUDLEY NICHOLS Art Direction by Alexander Golitzen 








WILL YOU WEAR THIS LOVELY 


10 DAYS’ TRIAL! 

Wear this Jumper and blouse at MY RISK. If in 10 days 
you are not completely satisfied, return for full refund. 

DOUBLE-DUTY-DOUBLE-BEAUTY! 

5 LOVELY COLORS 

A Jaunty Jumper and Smart Dress all in one! That’s 
the newest Bonnie Gays fashion created in Holly¬ 
wood to thrill you with its enchanting figure flattery. 
Wear it with the crisp high neckline blouse as a 
jumper ... or as a smart cap-sleeved dress without the 
blouse. Fashioned in a crisp, fine quality all season 
fabric; slenderizing waist-band; smart stitching ’round 
the neck and down the front; full skirt with pleat all 
make it style perfect! Sizes 12 through 20 and only 
$7.98 plus postage. An original Bonnie Gaye created 
in Hollywood. 

BLOUSE; A heart stealer with high round neckline 
and smart gathered fullness. Long sleeves. Lustrous 
rayon. Black or White. Sizes 32 to 40. Only $3.98 
plus postage. 

SEND NO MONEY—Check size and color choice 
and mail coupon. Pay postman C.O.D. charges. If, 
after 10 days you are' not satisfied return for full refund. 

For Prompt Delivery Rush This Coupon! 


BONNIE GAYE FASHIONS—Dept. 1-B 
168 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1, Ill. 

Please send smart 2-WAY JUMPER. I’ll pay 
postman $7.98 plus postage on arrival with un¬ 
derstanding I may return purchase for full re¬ 
fund if not satisfied in 10 days. (Mark 1st and 
I 2nd choice color selection). 

I Navy □ Brown □ Aqua □ Black □ Gray □ 

I (Circle Size) 

I 12 14 16 18 20 

I Please send BLOUSE at $3.98 plus postage. 
I White □ Black □ (Circle Size). 

32 34 36 38 40 

Name.. 

Address... 

City.Zone.. . .State. 

Note: Order 2 Jumpers for only $14.50 plus 
postage. □ 



So Proudly We Hail 


This is the fourth in a series of special features dedi¬ 
cated to Hollywood’s war veterans and men still in service 
—keeping up with the stars who’ve been away, and report¬ 
ing on the many who might have been stars by now if their 
careers hadn’t been interrupted. 



Bob Mitchum hopped out of the "Hopalong 
Cassidy" series into "G. I. Joe." He'll do 
"Till The End of Time" next. Ty Power is 
expected home in Feb.; Leif Ericson already 
has resumed his acting career. Gig Young 
starts again in "Escape Jvle Never" (WB). 


Lucky Gig Young! Not only has he his old job back (at 
Warner Bros.); he has his old house, too! It’s not unusual, 
these days, for a returned serviceman to be remembered by 
his ex-boss. But to receive the same greetings from his ex¬ 
landlord . . . that’s being Dame Fortune’s favorite son! 

Happening to Gig, though, it’s all as expected, you might 
say. Remember when he was Bryant Fleming, cast as Gig 
Young in “The Gay Sisters”? The preview cards, when that 
picture was sneak-shown at a Los Angeles suburban theatre, 
all came back with raves for “Gig Young.” 

Yup, that’s how it all started. He took the name as his 
own, and in rapid succession he played the co-pilot in “Air 
Force and Bette Davis young suitor in “Old Acquaintance.” 
Then this stardom-slated picture career came to a sudden 
halt; Gig joined the Navy on December 7, 1942. As a Phar¬ 
macist’s Mate 3rd Class, he saw action in the Solomons, New 
Hebrides, New Guinea, the Admiralties, and the Philippines. 
Now, discharged from the Navy, he’s back on the Warner 
lot; has a choice part in his first picture, “Escape Me Never,” 
with Errol Flynn and Eleanor Parker. 


* * * 

LEIF ERICKSON, Chief Photographer’s Mate in the Navy, 
is resuming his film-acting career after four years in uni¬ 
form. Leif saw plenty of action in the South Pacific; three 
of the ships from which he was photographing the Okinawa 
attack, were sunk. Although he was shouldering a camera 
instead of a gun, he had many a narrow escape—with times 
when he put his camera aside and (More on page opposite) 


18 




















pitched in where help was most 
needed. 

Back in Hollywood, Leif has de¬ 
cided to free lance for awhile; thinks 
he’ll stand a better chance, that way, 
for getting the kind of roles he really 
wants to play—such as the part he 
had in “HiM. Pulham, Es.” (remember 
Bo Jo Brown, the ex-football hero?), 
or the comedy role he did in the 
Bob Hope-Paulette Goddard picture, 
“Nothing But The Truth.” 

* * * 

ROBERT MITCHUM got his start 
playing tough hombres in the “Hopa- 
long Cassidy” series; he was the fel¬ 
low who always drew just a second 
later than the hero. Not much atten¬ 
tion was paid to him around Holly¬ 
wood, until he exchanged Western 
costumes for an Army uniform—ex¬ 
cept that when he played the Captain 
role in “The Story of G.I. Joe,” the 
late Ernie Pyle saw him and said that 
Robert was the Captain! 

“G. I. Joe” was Robert’s last civilian 
assignment. He was called into the 
Army then, and “demoted” to the rank 
of Sergeant. Because of his tremen¬ 
dous build (6 ft. 1 inch, weighing in 
at 180 pounds), he was asked to do 
M. P. work—but declined the offer, 
on the grounds that he didn’t want 
to “order a lot of guys'around.” After 
eight months (he was stationed at 
Camp Roberts) he received an honor¬ 
able discharge; is back on the RKO 
lot again now, and in uniform again. 
He’s a returned Marine hero in “Till 
the End of Time,” with Dorothy Mc¬ 
Guire and Guy Madison. 

* * * 

LT. ROBERT TAYLOR has finally 
received his discharge, and is back at 
M.G.M. His last duty for the Navy 
was narrating a picture about the 
serviceman’s “Bill of Rights.” 

* * * 

TYRONE POWER is expected home 
in February, to begin his starring role 
in “Captain from Castile,” for 20th. 

* * * 

JOHN HOWARD has been signed 

by Leland Hayward for the lead op¬ 
posite Geraldine Fitzgerald in a 
Broadway play. 

* * * 

RICHARD GREENE is starring in 
an English movie based on the life of 
George Edwardes, Britain’s Flo Zieg- 
feld. After that, he’ll be headed back 
to Hollywood. 

* ♦ * 

MICKEY ROONEY is planning to 
invest some of his money in an or¬ 
chestra, when he comes home. 

* * * 

RICHARD NEY has been released 
from the Navy and is seeking release 
from his M.G.M. contract. He feels 
he’ll do better at a studio where his 
wife isn’t an important star. 

* * * 

LIEUT. COMDR. DOUG FAIR¬ 
BANKS is all set for “Adventures of 
Sinbad”. Like father, like son; this 
is the type of picture in which Fair¬ 
banks Sr. loved to act. Maureen 
O'Hara and Walter Slezak will play 
with him. 

* * * 

GENE KELLY’s heart belongs to 
Hollywood. Though he’s still in the 
Navy, he’s already planning his first 
post-war movie. It’s the New York 
play “Are You With It”; he hopes to 
get M.G.M. to co-star him with Frank 
Sinatra again. 






wt % 




19 


v 






I N THE files of the DuBarry Success 
Course are thousands upon thousands 
of true success stories, but none more re¬ 
markable than that of Dorothy Mullins 
of Danbury, Connecticut. 

Dorothy was 34 years old. Only five 
feet tall, she weighed 215 pounds. Deeply 
sensitive about her size, she had long 
been resigned to what she thought was 
her lot in life. 

Several times, but always with lessening 
hope, Dorothy had tried so-called reduc¬ 
ing diets, but none brought results. Then 
she began to hear about the DuBarry Suc¬ 
cess Course. She sent for information. The 
Course could be taken at home—that was 
important. So she enrolled. 

Dorothy was advised first of all to go 
to her doctor, have a thorough physical 
examination, tell him what she planned 
to do. With his approval, she started. She 
lost 8 pounds the first week, 31 pounds in 
6 weeks. In six months, she went through 
the Course four times —lost a total of 87 
pounds, reduced her bust 8 inches, her 
waist 9 inches, her abdomen 12, her hips 
14. Accustomed to wearing a size 44 dress, 
she found she could slip into a 14. 

In spite of all this weight loss, Doro¬ 
thy’s skin is smooth, her body firm. She 
has learned to care for her complexion, 
to arrange her hair becomingly, to use 
make-up properly. Starting under a great 
handicap, she has made herself an at- 


Richard Hudnut Salon 
Dept. SB-54,693 Fifth Ave., New York 22, N. Y. 
Please send the booklet telling all about the 
DuBarry Home Success Course. 

Miss 

Mrs_ 


Street- 


City_ 


-Slate- 


tractive woman, with a good 
figure. 

“Gradually,” says Dorothy 
Mullins, “it is dawning on me 
that my life’s dream is coming 
true. It’s as if a new world had 
opened for me. The experience 
has made me so happy that 
never, never can I thank you 
enough.” 

Of course, the case of Dorothy 
Mullins is unusual. Few women 
need to lose 87 pounds. But her 
achievement offers convincing 
proof to countless other women 
with far less to lose that they need not be 
overweight. Dorothy Mullins has empha¬ 
sized what a quarter of a million other 
women have happily discovered—that the 
DuBarry Success Course is a plan that 
really works. It can help you bring your 
weight to normal, have a figure you’re 
proud of, have a smooth, glowing skin, 
learn glamorous make-up, look better] 
feel better, make the most of yourself. 
And you can enjoy this plan at home-at 
a cost so low it will surprise you. You fol- 
low the same methods taught by Ann 
Delafield at the famous Richard Hudnut 
Salon, New York. 

Why not at least find out what the 
Course can do for you? The coupon will 
bring you full information. 




Ann Delafield, Directing 


INSIDE HOLLYWOOD 

tCONTINUED FROM PAGE 101 


the same trouble. So, as long as the car has 
stubborn spells, Miss Landis will reach the 
studio by ruse of thumb. 

BOYS, SLICE THE HAM THINNER: 

George Sidney, who directed MGM's deli¬ 
cious "Harvey Girls." has just received a 
free meal ticket to every Harvey House in 
America as token of gratitude from the Fred 
Harvey organization. Now if he can just 
make a picture about the romance of brew¬ 
ing beer. . . . 

QUOTABLES FROM NOTABLES: 

Kathryn Grayson, commenting on the 
corset she wore in "Two Sisters From Bos¬ 
ton": "A corset doesn't make you any 
smaller, it just pushes you around in differ¬ 
ent distributions." 

Penny Singleton's daughter, Dorothy 
Grace, has taken up zoology. While watch¬ 
ing her mother proudly fasten the clasp 
of a string of superb, matched pearls that is 
Penny's dearest gem possession, Dorothy 
Grace observed ^laconically, "Those beads 
are just an oyster's stomach ache." 

An inquisitive visitor asked Barbara 
Stanwyck's son, Tony, how old his mother 
was. Answered Tony glibly, "She's really 
thirty-five, but we've marked her down to 
thirty-two." 

Just before Christmas, Allan Jones' son, 
Jackie, asked his father to secure some 
Change Of Address cards from the Post 
Office. Explained Jackie, "You've been 
saying how inefficient help is nowadays; 
well, I want to be sure that Santa Claus 
gets our change of address. I don't want 
to trust the office girl to look me up in 
the records." 

On the return trip from Mexico City, 
where she had been working in "Fiesta," 
Esther Williams persuaded the pilot of the 
plane in which she was flying to reconnoiter 
Paricutin, the new Mexican volcano. ft 
was quite a sight, more awesome than in¬ 
spiring. Said Miss Williams, "That's the 
only way to observe a volcano, from far up 
and going away." 

HOW TO BECOME AN ACTOR: 

It is likely that Van Heflin has received 
more press compliments upon his employ¬ 
ment of manual pantomime than any other 
actor in the business. Watch him when you 
see him in Paramount's forthcoming "Love 
Lies Bleeding." He never wastes a motion, 
yet never neglects an opportunity to use his 
hands effectively. 

While the picture was in production, some- 
°ne noticing the utter ease of Van's hands— 
asked him how he had conquered the ner¬ 
vous mannerisms of most human digits. 
Grinned Van, "This sounds crazy, but it's 
true. When I was studying stagecraft I 
sewed up every pocket in my clothes, every 
single pocket, so that I'd have to get used 
to the idea that hands were made to assist 
in projecting an emotion, and that they 
weren't squirrels to hide in a dark hollow 
at every opportunity." 

LE MOT JUSTE: 

Anthony Quinn's sub-echool daughter, 
Christina, watching her father working his 
head off on the screen for hie cbaracteriza- 


20 















tion in "Back To Bataan," finally leaned over 
to her mother in the theatre to inquire rea¬ 
sonably enough, "Why doesn't Daddy come 
over here with us and sit down?" 

Among his birthday gifts, Pat O'Brien re¬ 
ceived a dressing gown on which was 
printed a gymkhana of pink horses. Quipped 
Mr. O Brien, "If I had Crosby's nerve, I'd 
turn this into a sports jacket." 

Arnold Pressburger wired Carole Landis, 
when she was preparing to go to work in 
"Scandal In Paris": "Your costumes French 
period. Sketches mailed today.” The sketches 
arrived, whereupon—since she had no tele¬ 
phone—Carole replied, by wire: “Correc¬ 
tion please. Costumes French exclamation 
point.” 

HOW TO DIAL LAUGHING: 

Kurt Kruger's telephone number is iden¬ 
tical, except lor a single letter in the prefix, 
with that of one of Los Angeles' haughtiest 
stores. Occasionally some grande dame 
gets confused and dials Kurt instead of the 
shop. Not long ago a lorgnette that talked 
like a woman telephoned Kurt to say, "I'd 
like to talk to the sports department, please." 

I m so sorry." said Kurt, "but you have 
the wrong number." He hung up. 

Two seconds later, the same woman called 
again. Again the explanation. This went 
on for about two hours. Finally, in despera¬ 
tion, Kurt said. "The sports department is 
closed indefinitely—no merchandise." 

The telephone stopped ringing. To salve 
his conscience. Mr. Kreuger visited the sports 
department and did a good deal of his 
Christmas shopping. 

RETURN OF HUNKO: 

The largest excitement to break out in 
the 20th Commissary for a long, long time 
occurred one noon recently. Late comers 
were unable to see what was causing the 
commotion, because the table was entirely 
surrounded by five or six layers of people, 
all talking at once. Investigation (i.e. crawl¬ 
ing on hands and’ knees to a vantage point 
under the table) supplied the information 
that Victor Mature was back from the wars. 

(Continued on page 56) 



Victor Mature, his first day out of service. 
Civvies are no problem; he had his in storage! 



a iney/ifif fYty/i/y flaZfebek, 

we say, Claire Kay designed to go with your gaiest 
spring doings! Ruifly cap sleeves, a new easy 
simplicity, washable Cohn-Hall-Marx Ripple-Moss woven 
seersucker—very junior gender, indeed! J|| 

Red, green, royal, brown. 9 to 15. 


GITTLEMAFS 

Six Stores in Michigan: 

Alma • Ionia • Greenville • Midland • Mt. Pleasant • Cadillac 


MAIL ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY 

gittlbman’s style shops Alma, Michigan 

Please send me the CLAIRE KAY JUNIOR described above for which I endose 
$5.40 plus 15c for postage. 

Size _ Color (state 1st and 2nd choice) _ 





City Zone 

State 



Cxish 

__ Money Order 


C.O.D. 







































M 

22 


Ho* 


LjO U 


'll 


V" I 

THINK OF 
TAMPAX 
NEXT MONTH 


NO BELTS 
NO PINS 
NO PADS 
NO ODOR 





TAMPAX can make you some definite 
promises for next month— if you use this 
modern type of sanitary protection. For 
example, you’ll need no belts, pins or 
external pads. No sanitary deodorant 
will be required because odor cannot 
form with Tampax. There will be no 
chafing or bulging to make you uncom¬ 
fortable, and no uneasy feeling that 
"edge-lines” may be showing. 

TAMPAX gives women a wonderful 
feeling of freedom on "those days of the 
month” because it discards all outside 
bulk whatever. Based on the principle of 
internal absorption and perfected by a 
doctor, Tampax is made throughout of 
pure absorbent cotton, compressed in 
dainty applicators. Your hands need 
never touch the Tampax and you are un¬ 
aware of its presence when it is in place. 
Changing is quick and disposal easy. 

TAMPAX is sold at drug stores and 
notion counters in 3 absorbency-sizes: 
Regular, Super, J unior. A whole month’s 
supply will fit into your purse. The 
Economy Box holds 4 months’ supply 
(average). Tampax Incorporated, Palmer, 
Massachusetts. 



3 absorbencies 


REGULAR 

SUPER 

JUNIOR 


Accepted for Advertising 
by tie Journal of the American Medical Association 



A WALK IN THE SUN (20th Century-Fox) 

—A simple but extremely realistic 
story of a platoon of Yanks, part of 
an invading force storming Salerno 
in the Italian campaign. Screened 
from the poetic war-novel by Harry 
Brown, moviegoers will go a long way 
before they’ll see another picture that 
expresses so completely the reality of 
War, and the thoughts, reminiscences 
and hopes of a group of typical Amer¬ 
ican men. The parts were perfectly 
cast: Dana Andrews is Sgt. Tyne, and 
Richard Conte, George Tyne, John 
Ireland, Lloyd Bridges, Sterling Hol¬ 
loway, Norman Lloyd, Herbert Rud- 
ley, Richard Benedict and Huntz Hall 
are the weary foot soldiers they repre¬ 
sent. 

WHAT NEXT, CORPORAL HARGROVE 

(M-G-M) —Robert Walker and Keenan 
Wynn are still in the Army, this time 
in Europe. Through a series of hila¬ 
rious happenings, Hargrove is both 
scapegoat and hero. Jean Porter, the 
only girl in the cast, flirts her way 
through it all, assisted by a well- 
chosen cast. Outstanding is Chill Wills 
as Hargrove’s Sergeant. 

MEET ME ON BROADWAY (Columbia) is 
a musical about the trials and tribu¬ 
lations involved in putting on a 
Broadway show. Marjorie Reynolds 
sings, Fred Brady plays producer, Jinx 
Falkenburg is a society aspirant to the 
footlights, and Loren Tindall is the 
man with the “moolah.” Spring By- 
ington, Gene Lockhart and Allen 
Jenkins lend able-support. 

MISS SUSIE SLAGLE’S (Paramount) is 
noteworthy on many scores. It brings 
back to the screen a beautiful and ma¬ 
ture Lillian Gish, and it’s not a war 
picture. 

Every four years a new crop of 
medical students stay at Miss Susie 
Slagle’s (Lillian Gish) boardinghouse. 
Her warm understanding and help are 
traditional to every medical student 
aspiring to the title of “Doctor.” 

Among Miss Susie’s boys are Sonny 
Tufts, a farmer who thinks he can’t 
be a surgeon “cause his hands are too 
big”; Billy DeWolfe, who turns in a 
wonderfully humorous performance 
with the aid of subtle faeial muscle- 
twitching (he does a devastating im¬ 
personation of a stuffy professor in 
the classroom); Bill Edwards, who is 
handicapped by his famous surgeon 
father (Ray Collins), Pat Phelan and 
Renny McEvoy. Veronica Lake wears 
the high collar of a student nurse most 


becomingly, but it is Joan Caulfield 
who gives a truly expert and endear¬ 
ing performance of a brazen girl of 
high breeding who sets her eyes and 
mind on Sonny Tufts. 

If this galaxy of stars isn’t enough 
to draw you to this fine picture, there’s 
Morris Carnovsky and Roman Bohnen 
to fill in as “characters” in the cast. 
JOHNNY IN THE CLOUDS (Two Cities 
Films, released through U. A.)— The story 
of a squadron of American flyers based 
at an English airdrome and sharing 
quarters with R.A.F. boys. Obviously 
the sort of thing which would have 
had more effect, released a year ago; 
yet it drives home a “goodwill among 
nations” moral, good any time. Michael 
Redgrave, John Mills, Stanley Hollo¬ 
way. Felix Aylmer, Basil Radford 
and Bonar Colleano, Jr. are uni¬ 
formly excellent in their roles; also 
Douglass Montgomery, whose name 
should be familiar to American audi¬ 
ences for his stage and screen appear¬ 
ances in this country, several years 
ago. Rosamund John and Renee Ash- 
erson are the gals in this predomi- 
nantlv male cast. 

WHISTLE STOP (produced by Seymour 

Nebenzal, released through U. A.) —Nothing 

ever happens in a whistle stop home¬ 
town? Don’t you believe it! For 
there’s plenty of excitement in Ash¬ 
bury, when Ava Gardner comes back 
after two years in “the big city.” 
Situation is this: Eva is really in love 
with Kenny (George Raft), but he’s 
a shiftless, loafing moocher. So she 
accepts the attentions of Lew Lentz 
(Tom Conway), a shady character 
who wants to marry her. And from 
that triangle conflict comes murder, 
robberies, plots and counter-plots— 
and Victor McLaglen to resolve it all 
into a fairly happy ending. Leonide 
Moguy directed, from a Philip Yordan 
screenplay based on an original novel 
by Maritta M. Wolff. 

TARS AND SPARS (Columbia) stars 
Janet Blair, Alfred Drake, dancer 
Marc Platt, and introduces a new dis¬ 
covery, Sid Caesar. There’s singing 
and dancing in the story about the 
ups and downs of Seaman Alfred 
Drake, who wants to go to sea but 
seems destined to fight the war 
from Catalina Island. He wants to 
be a hero to his Tar cupcake, Janet 
Blair. 



Jonet Blair, Alfred Drake in "Tars and Spars.” 

















LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN (20th Century- 
Fox)—The much discussed Ben Ames 
Williams novel comes to the screen 
with Gene Tierney as the. beautiful 
Ellen, whose jealousy not only con¬ 
sumed herself, but who in death man¬ 
aged to keep a strangle hold on her 
unhappy husband, Richard Harland 
(Cornel Wilde), and her half-sister, 
Ruth (Jeanne Crain). Director John 
Stahl has retained much of the book’s 
color and intensity and rooted in the 
screen conflict is a story of brooding 
suspense. Vincent Price plays the 
formidable District Attorney Russell 
Quinton, with fine support from Mary 
Phillips, Ray Collins, Gene Lockhart, 
Darryl Hickman and Chill Wills. 

THE OUTLAW (Howard Hughes production, 
released by U. A.) is the long-awaited 
$2,000,000 Western, with Jane Russell 
(as Rio, the vicious little half-breed), 
Jack Beutel (who plays Billy, a dar¬ 
ing young gunman), Walter Huston 
(as Doc Holliday, tough-guy gam¬ 
bler), and Thomas Mitchell. It’s a 
story of the early 1900’s, Howard 
Hughes directed. Held up for four 
years by “-censorship problems,” after 
the initial opening and 10-weeks run 
in San Francisco, the picture is being 
released now just as it was originally 
produced; nothing deleted nor omitted. 

MASQUERADE IN MEXICO (Paramount) 

—A musical concoction made tasty, by 
nice blending of Dorothy Lamour’s 
singing, Arturo DeCordova’s clown¬ 
ing, Patric Knowles’ romancing, Ann 
Dvorak’s sirening and George Rigaud’s 
villaining. Lamour’s “masquerade” in¬ 
cludes costume changes that amount 
to a style show. Pleasant entertain¬ 
ment. 

GIRL ON THE SPOT (Universal) is Lois 
Collier, who was on the scene when a 
nightclub owner was killed — but 
didn’t know it. Get it? Neither could 
Ace crime photographer Jess Barker, 
until he decided Lois had nothing to 
do with the crime. He has to prove 
it to the Law, however, and does so 
on the- opening night of a Broadway 
extravaganza that stars Lois. Love, 
Talent and the Law cooperate to 
catch the real murderer. Ludwig 
Stoessel, George Dolenz, Fuzzy Knight 
and Edward Brophy help get our 
heroine off the spot. 

THEY WERE EXPENDABLE (M-G-M) — 

An absorbing dramatization of Wil¬ 
liam L. White’s book, bringing Robert 
Montgomery (Comdr., U.S.N.R.) back 
to the screen as the skipper of a P.T. 
boat. The film follows the P.T.’s 
through playing “messenger” for the 
Navy, at the outset of their war duty, 
into the thrilling and heroic service 
they performed later, in actual battle. 
All very “real,” and with a romance 
between “Rusty” (John Wayne) and 
Nurse Donna Reed filling in lighter 
moments of relief, for what’s other¬ 
wise a tense drama of things that 
really happened. 

CINDERELLA JONES (Warner Bros.)— 

A zany story with musical background 
involving the plight of Judy Jones 
(Joan Leslie) who must marry by a 
certain date in order to inherit 10 
million dollars. Her uncle’s will 
stipulates that the prospective spouse 
must have an I.Q. of 150 or better, 
and this turns out to be more difficult 
than you’d imagine—but is amus¬ 
ing, nonetheless. Robert Alda, Julie 
Bishop, William Prince and S. Z. 
Sakall are pleasant additions to the 
money-mad story. 

(Continued on page 60) 


|W Pt 


B A R B A R A H ALE ri *° ra,>, ° wc. 

LADY LUCK 



Loveliest Lustre . .. Quick , Clean 
...with Blended Vegetable Oils 

Capture the beauty of the stars in your 
hair with GLO-VER Beauty Shampoo 
—so easy to use, so quick, so delight¬ 
fully cleansing! 

JS’o other shampoo can adorn your 
hair with lovelier lustre, more natural¬ 
looking sparkle and brilliance, daintier 
springtime softness, than GLO-VER. 
Contains cleansing agents made from 
blended vegetable oils. Rinses out 
easily, completely . . . not a trace of 
unsightly film! Removes loose dan¬ 
druff—leaves scalp refreshingly clean, 
hair radiantly manageable! Ask for 
GLO-VER at any Drug Store or 
Drug Counter today — or 
mail the Coupon. 


Your Hair will be Lovelier with 

GLO-VER 



Includes GLO-VER Beauty 
Shampoo, Glover's Mange Med¬ 
icine and Glover's Imperial 
Hair Dress—one application of 
each with easy directions for 
famous Glover's 3-Way Treat¬ 
ment and FREE booklet. "The 
Scientific Care of the Hair.” 


Glover’s, 101 W. 31st St., Dept 672,, N.Y. I, N.Y. 

Send Free Trial Application package in plain 
wrapper by return mail, containing 3-Way Treat¬ 
ment in three hermetically-sealed bottles, with FREE 
booklet. I enclose 10(f to cover cost of packaging 
and postage. 


Name _ 


Address _ 


Please print plainl 


City- 


..Zone _ State.. 

















By SHIRLEY COOK 

Beauty Editor 





to cherish dry skin. Stroke 

on, tissue off soil and repeat. Eye-eye sir! To light your eyes as Andrea 

does, apply dry skin cream to lids, then 
cover with pads soaked in iced freshener. 



Skin is safer, make-up looks 
smoother, when tinted cream is 
spread to a fine protective film. 



An evening of formal festivity 
is something to dream about. 
Comes the date, the dream will be 
you —if you base your party 
primping on constant, consistent 
skin care. 

For advice on those complex¬ 
ions that will need the most con¬ 
scientious care, we consulted An¬ 
drea King. Now according to 
Andrea, her dry skin is cause for 
consideration, but not necessarily 
for concern. Here’s what you do: 

Cleanse with cream, every 
morning, every evening and once 
during the day. Use light up and 
out strokes and tissue off all soil 
and stale make-up. 

For stimulation (which every 
skin needs) pat your clean face 
gently but briskly with a mild 
freshener. 

Give it plenty of lubrication! 
Choose a rich skin cream, perhaps 
one that contains lanolin, and pat 
it into your freshly cleansed skin 
whenever you have fifteen or 
twenty minutes to let it soak in 
and soften thoroughly. 

While such care should keep 
you soft as silk, don’t forget to 
complete and protect it with the 
use of a softening cream make-up 
base. 

You see, the best plan for a 
party-goer is a skin treatment 
program that will keep her devas¬ 
tating every day. 


"Party"—but never partly —perfect. See 
Andrea, "Shadow of a Woman” (WB). 


on 


□ 


"Party Ptevtecv 


































This Sensational Best-Seller 

FREE! 


the book everybody's talking about 


KfTTY 


9f 





with your FREE membership 
in The Fiction Book Club 


— girl of the streets who set her scarlet cap of curls for 
the bluest blood in England —and got what she wanted! 


ACCEPT NOW —this frank, intimate 
romantic novel —so outstanding 
Hollywood spent $2,000,000 to 
make it one of its greatest 
all-star smash hits! 

Mail coupon now for 
FREE copy of "KITTY"! 


THERE NEVER WAS ANOTHER LIKE KITTY— 
with her satin skin and melting mouth. Kitty with 
the lithe body of a wildcat . . . the tongue of a 
teamster . . . the greed of a girl of the streets. 
Kitty — the saucy strumpet of Half-Moon 
Alley who became the Duchess all England 
talked about. 

Accept this sensational best-seller FREE, 
to introduce you to The Fiction Book 
Club. Discover why Hollywood se¬ 
lected “KITTY” as the book of the 
year — for one of its most lavish 
movies starring Paulette Goddard 
and Ray Milland. 

Mail coupon now—and then fol¬ 
low Kitty’s amazing adventures 
as she moves from slumtown to 
the silks of high society. Be with 
Kitty as she poses for Gains¬ 
borough and first fell in love with 
his famous portrait “The Blue 
Boy”—It was the most bewitch- 


Will you call her ^ 
r wicked or wonderful... ^ 

...schemer...siren...or angel? Raised 
in the gutters of London, she climbed to 
the top of the social ladder, but never for- 
got her past. A great rogue-heroine, 
Steven her good deeds set afire the J 
scandal of her age. 


“Nothing 
so good 
in its 
field 
for 

several 

seasons/’ 

Philadelphia 

Inquirer 


Thrill to love scenes 
yotTII never forget! 

I Even the reviewers fell in love with 
“KITTY” ... “KITTY is a peppery 
tale of romance and intrigue. .. spicy 
and adult...robust...”—N. Y. Times 
“There is erudition here that bespeaks 
a great knowledge of the times and peo¬ 
ple... there is sophistication and lack 
of prudery.”—Chicago Tribune. 

“KITTY’S frank story of her rise to fame will 
please those who enjoy sheer romance delicately 
uninhibited.”—Washington Times Herald. 


What a Story! What a Woman! 

No wonder the”Chicago Sun” 
says: "Every so often another 
portrait is added to that fic¬ 
tional gallery of minxes which 
includesCarmen,Becky Sharpe 
and Scarlett O'Hara. 'Kitty' is 
the latest comer to this wan¬ 
ton company and she bids fair 
to hold her own with the 
glamorous lot of them.” 


ing face Kitty had ever seen and she was to find no peace until 
she met the grown-up “Blue Boy” in person! 

What were the secret scandals that kept Kitty 
from marrying the "Blue Boy" of her dreams? 

Hugh Marcy brought 

speak, to act like a lady, and launched a 

career that was to be the talk of England. Wj 

mured. And Kitty took his advice. With 

B* ^penny’s worth . . . but who didn’t ^ * 

■Bi live long enough to collect from 
Kitty. After Jonathan’s violent 
end, Kitty kept right on climb¬ 
ing . . . became the wife of a 
\ doting old Duke ... who gave 
\ Kitty his fortune . . . but his 
Mms& W most cherished dream, the 
birth of an heir, was too much 
for his old heart. His sud¬ 
den passing left her free for 
Brett—the “Blue Boy” of 
her dreams who’d haunted 
her every adventure. But 

when Brett, Lord of Montford, finally offered her his hand 
in marriage, could Kitty accept ? She had riches. . . she 
had power... but could she pay the price for the only man 
she ever loved? 

You’ll thrill to the way Kitty comes to grips with destiny 
and applaud her courageous decision as this stirring novel 
swells to its glorious romantic conclusion. You’ve never read 
a book like “KITTY”.. . and “KITTY” is yours FREE when 
you join The Fiction Book Club. But hurry! Mail coupon now! 


These two men ruled her life.. 

First there was her rakish 
lover. Sir Hugh Marcy, who 
taught her there was nothing 
but a few yards of silk and a 
man's will between a great 
lady and a street urchin. Then 
there was Brett Harwood, 
who taught her there was a 
greater happiness —the true 
love only sacrifice could buy! 


Membership is FREE in The FICTION BOOK CLUB 

— and you get all these Money-Saving advantages too! 


You will be sent immediately 
FREE your copy of the best¬ 
seller “Kitty” when you mail 
the coupon. You’ll also become a 
member of The Fiction Book 
Club with your choice of the 
club’s monthly best-seller selec¬ 
tions and you’ll get these four 
big advantages, too: 

I. You save $1 to $2 on every book! 

Fiction Book Club contracts for big 
special editions—prints from original 
plates and in return for mass distri¬ 
bution, authors accept lower royalties. 
These savings are passed right on to 
you. You save $1 to $2 on every book 
you get. And you get the best-seller, 
“Kitty,” FREE as an introductory 
gift 1 


2. You get outstanding new books! 

Selections are made only after a care¬ 
ful study of nationwide current best 
sellers. From these reports of best 
sellers at $2.50 to $3.50, our editors 
select the available books that are 
“the cream of the crop.” No guess¬ 
work. No opinions. Fiction Book Club 
selections are always outstanding best¬ 
sellers . . . books by leading authors 
. . . brand-new, full-size, cloth-bound 
books you will be proud to own. 

3. You pay no special dues or fees! 
No trick obligation clauses. You 
simply agree to accept any six of the 
twelve outstanding books offered in a 
year. You do not have to accept every 
book offered — just those you decide 
you want after you have read a de¬ 
tailed description well in advance. 


4. You’ll find plan so simple and easy! 

If you decide you don't want the book 
simply notify us not to send it. Other¬ 
wise simply do nothing, and it will be 
mailed to you. For each monthly selec¬ 
tion YOU decide you want you pay 
just $1.39 plus a few cents postage. 

SO ACT NOW! 

Get your FREE copy of “Kitty” 
—the book everybody'^ talking 
about and all the conveniences 
and savings of free Fiction 
Book Club membership! But 
hurry—offer is limited! It’s first 
come—first served. Mail coupon 
NOW to The Fiction Book Club. 
31 West 57th St., New York 19. 


CURRENT SELECTION! High on best-seller lists! Over 136,000 copies published! 


Upton Sinclair's latest and 
greatest best-seller . . . 

“DRAGON HARVEST” 

Now $3 in publisher*8 edition! 


A big exciting 70$“-page novel that combines the amazing inside story of what 
happened in Europe from Munich to the fall of France with the breath-taking 
adventures of the amazing Lanny Budd in outwitting Hitler and scores of other 
Nazi and Fascist leaders ... as he rescues lovely Laura Creston from the 
relentless Gestapo. “One of the great literary achievements of our period,” 
say reviewers. Don’t miss this great romantic novel! 


SEND NO MONEY! MAIL COUPON NOW! HURRY. .. OFFER LIMITED! 


I 


Send no money! Mail coupon 


»i 


YOURS FREE-"KITTY" I 

The romantic novel everybody's talking about I 

The FICTION BOOK CLUB- «o -2 I 

31 West 57th St., New York 19, N.Y. 

Send me FREE the novel “Kitty” and also I 
FREE give me my fully-privileged member- I 
ship in The Fiction Book Club. Each month | 
you are to offer me a new and popular best- | 
seller at only $1.39 (plus a few cents postage) 
—savings to me of $ 1 to $2 on each book from ■ 
the regular price of the publisher’s edition. I 
(The current selection is “Dragon Harvest”— I 
sensational $3. best-seller by Upton Sinclair.) 
However, I can accept or reject monthly selec- I 
tions as I please. My only agreement is to | 
purchase 6 out of the entire year's offerings. 
Rush my free copy of “Kitty” right away and 
begin my club service with current selection. I 


Name. 


Address. 


State. 


City -- 

(In Canada: 266 King's St. West; Toronto) 


25 

















26 


" Di 9 You lo»er" (THE HUBBA-HUBBA-MUBBA SONGI) • "Somebody's Walkin' In My Dreams" • "Here Comes Heaven Again" • "ChicoChico" • by Jimmy McHugh ond Harold Adamson 






By KAY PROCTOR 





• • glenn langan 



Once upon a time a rugged individualist of Hollywood was 
supposed to have kicked an august producer squarely in the seat 
of his pants, saying in succinct explanation: “That's for making 
‘Noah’s Ark’!” 

Long since forgotten, the story may or may not have been true. 

Far from forgotten, however, and 100% true, is another seat- 
of-the-pants episode in Hollywood, less publicized at the time, 
perhaps, but equally majestic, in its proportions. It occurred in 
the forecourt of Grauman’s Chinese Theater on the night in 1937 
when “Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves” was (Continued on page 99) 


Glenn once gave a famous director the "bum’s rush’’—and lived to talk about it! 


27 














Audrey likes any color, just so 
it's green. Sacrificed gorgeous 
red hair for a dark brown dye job 
in her last two pictures for MGM. 


Joliet (III.) High School plays 
started her seeking stage career. 
Sold floor wax from door to door 
to finance dramatic education. 




tm 










A "Who's That?’* girl, as she is known in Hollywood 



LITTLE AUDREY 


By HELEN LOUISE WALKER 



Of Swedish descent, gastronomic 
tastes lean toward Smorgasbord. 
Next pic, "Sailor Takes A Wife!" 


Audrey Totter went to her first big Hollywood party not long ago when 
Charles Feldman entertained at a really super event. The party was 
in honor of Marlene Dietrich, who recently had returned from over¬ 
seas, and Audrey was every bit as excited and thrilled as a 
girl has a right to expect to be at her first important Hollywood affair. 

“It was sheer fairyland!” she said. “The lights—so many 
lovely lights shimmering through the trees and shrubs in 
the garden; the beautiful, beautiful women with won¬ 
derful clothes and jewels; all the men, right out of your 
favorite movies; and nearly everyone you saw or met 
had a name which was famous everywhere! And such 
a little while ago, I was living in that bleak little 
room and was so terribly lonely. It was incredible, just 
like those things you read and never quite believe. 
All of which makes Audrey sound like a rags-to-riches 
motion picture Cinderella—and that isn’t true of 
her at all. Audrey had a fine and solidly established 
career before she came to the Coast and, what’s 
more, she had put a fat, signed-and-sealed picture 
contract into her purse before she ever bought a train 
ticket from New York. It was a set of fan¬ 
tastic circumstances which created these curious 
contrasts in her life those first months in Holly¬ 
wood. She finds it all rather surprising—even now. 
You see, the housing shortage was at a peak 
when she arrived in Hollywood last Janu¬ 
ary. When the studio (M-G-M) undertook 
to find her a place to live, Audrey ex¬ 
plained that she had no car and further¬ 
more couldn’t drive one even if she 
had; so she would like to be near the 
studio. Well, Metro is in Culver 
City, which is miles from Hollywood, 
and all they could find for her 
there was the aforementioned bleak 
room in a bleaker little hotel, 
surrounded by small, drab res¬ 
taurants and lunch counters. 
She didn’t (Continued on page 77) 


Radio is an old story. Her throaty voice is adaptable to dialects, so 
she's played every type character in soap operas and other radio shows. 


29 











lty Itilla Page Palmhorg 


the 


house of 


morgan 


Horn Dennis Morner; a Swede from Wiseonsin 


“It’s the luck of the Irish,” said Hollywood, when Dennis Morgan bought 
his fabulous four-acre mountain top estate, for much less than the original 
cost, and signed a new seven-year contract with Warner Bros. 

But Dennis is not Irish. His ancestors were Swedes—yes, from ’way back. 
And he’s come a long way, has Dennis Morgan . . . since that unforgettable 
day, some ten years ago, when he left his wife and baby (Stanley, their first¬ 
born) waiting in their stalled jallopy, along the New Mexico highway, while 
he hurried back to a little desert town two miles away. 

“Seven and a half dollars was all the money I had,” Dennis tells now. “My 
prayers that our old car and my lean purse would hold out until we reached 
Hollywood . . . well, it was asking rather a lot, I guess. But I had a contract 
tucked in my inside coat pocket—that’s what counted; my contract with 
MGM, which had literally been handed to me out of the blue, back in New 
York: 

“I didn’t have enough money to replace the tire that had blown out, to say 
nothing of funds to carry us on to California. But if I stopped to earn money, 
I knew I’d lose out on my contract. The trip had taken longer than I’d figured; 
I was due to check in at Metro in four days. 

“Wiring my father for help was something I had never done. ‘There must 
be some other way out,’ I thought, as I turned into a little lunchroom on the 
edge of town. 

“I ordered a much-needed cup of coffee. I must have sat at the counter 
longer than I realized. Just vaguely, I was conscious of a tall, lean cowboy 
walking across the room and sitting down on the stool beside me. He was 
wearing a ten-gallon hat; the first I’d ever seen. I didn’t realize he was 
speaking to me, though, until he put his hand on my shoulder. 

“ ‘You look mighty cut up about something, son,’ he said. ‘Maybe there’s 
something I can do for you.” 

“My first thought was that he might know where I could find a job. I told 
him about Lillian and Stanley waiting in the stalled car. He asked me where 
I was from, where I was going. He wanted to know what I was going to do 
when I got to California. 

“Before I knew it, I found myself telling him the story of my life. How I 
had always loved to sing, even when I was a kid back in the little Wisconsin 
town where I came from. I told him about meeting Lillian at Carroll College, 
where she was the belle of the campus. The fun we had doing college plays. 
Our courtship and marriage. 

“I told him about singing on radio shows in Chicago. How one of my 
broadcasts won me the chance to sing on a Mary Garden program in New 
York. How a Metro talent scout heard me and offered to make a screen test. 
I showed him my Metro contract. 

“And then, before I realized what he was doing, (Continued on page 85) 

< ----— 

The singer who almost didn’t sing in pictures. But since 

"The Desert Song” and '’The Time. The Place and the Girl.” 
the fan requests are flooding in for more Morgan musicals 




31 






I 












The lady psychiatrist in Colombia’s 
”She Wouldn’t Say Yes” reverses the 
play and ”tells all”—about hersell 


32 










t 





■ 

m 

1 


j ■ 

\ i 


"Renegade" (Col.) is a western opus with (left to right) Forrest Tucker, Willard Robinson, 
Evelyn Keyes, Robt. Williams, Edgar Buchanan and Ed Waller. This started out under title 
of "The Kansan" and heralds return of Willard Parker, just discharged from U. S. Army. 



35 





By DOROTHY B. HAAS 





It takes lots of intestinal fortitude to realize at the age of 
sixteen that one may never walk or swim or dance again, 
and despite that knowledge go on hoping and praying and 
knowing that one will do them. 

That’s what little Ann Blyth did. 

She had the will and the spirit to go through the ordeal of 
a broken back which might have left her a helpless invalid, 
without ever losing confidence. She never let herself believe, 
either, after it was certain she would recover, that her re¬ 
cuperation would be as slow as doctors predicted. Her 
formula might well be helpful to wounded G.I.s who face 
similar long recuperative periods. 

“I never doubted my recovery. I prayed hard. I kept busy.” 

Now she’s walking again, with care, but ahead of schedule, 
thanks to the Blyth spirit. By the time you read this she 
probably will be dancing and swimming and will have re¬ 
sumed'her acting career. She’s a remarkable young girl, in 
addition to being an exceptional actress. . 

It was last March, at the end of the winter sports season 
in California’s mountains, that petite Ann was thrown off a 
speeding toboggan when it hit an ice patch. She landed flat 
on her back and for several minutes was knocked as cold 
as the snow on which she lay. Miraculously, despite the ex¬ 
cruciating pain in her back which she tried to believe was 
only a wrench, she managed to walk nearly a mile to the 
lodge where her mother noticed tearstains on her cheeks. 

“I’ve been crying from laughing, we’ve had so much fun,” 
she lied to prevent her mother’s worrying. With teeth set 
she endured an 18-mile auto ride from Snow Valley to San 
Bernardino, but on getting out of the car there her will 
power no longer could sustain the pain. She crumpled and 
collapsed. 

At the hospital x-rays revealed “.compressed fracture of 
the vertebrae.” In other words, her backbone w’as not only 
broken, but squashed. To give it room to knit properly she 
was curved over a board arc on her (Continued on page 71) 


They said she would never he 
able to walk again. But she 

ean! Ann Blyth has recovered 


Univ. has big plans for this seventeen-year-old. 




36 













I 



. » 





Olga San Juan and Bing in "Blue Skies." 


/■ 







Music is now firmly planted on the top 
rung of the movie ladder—"not for Just 
a month, not for Just a year, but always 59 

By GERTRUDE SHANKLUV 

Gone with the wind are the days when music was 
just one of the props in movie-making. Today music 
often turns out to be the real star of the picture, no 
matter who gets the billing. 

Remember how the comments ran after “Song to 
Remember” hit the screen? “The music is perfectly 
wonderful!” people would say. “All that beautiful 
Chopin music was played by Jose Iturbi, you know. 
Merle Oberon never looked more beautiful, and of 
course Paul Muni and Cornel Wilde are excellent. 
It’s a grand picture.” 

All perfectly true, but you notice what always came 
in for first mention. Everybody and everything in that 
fine picture played second fiddle to the magnificent 
piano recording. And ever since its release, folks who 
frankly say they don’t know Rimsky from Korsakov 
have been whistling polonaises while they work. 

Now, encouraged by the success of “Song,” Hollywood 
is breaking out in a perfect rash of musical pictures, 
featuring both classical and modern styles. And it’s 
a pretty safe bet that in each, the music will outshine 
the stars. 

One of the most ambitious of these is “I’ve Always 
Loved You” (formerly called “Concerto”) which repre¬ 
sents several “firsts” for Republic Studio. It’s Frank 
Borzage’s first production at that studio; it’s their first 
in Technicolor; it’s the first big acting opportunity for 
their new romantic team, Catherine McLeod and Bill 
Carter; and last but far from least, it’s the first full- 
length feature to present Artur Rubinstein’s music to 
the motion picture public. 

“I’ve Always Loved You” is a fictional story about 



"Geetar" strummer Burl Ives sings Dinah ghost-stars for cartoon in 
his popular ballads in "Smoky." Walt Disney's "Make Mine Music." 


38 





















TAKES A BOW 




















Jose Iturbi tickles 
ivories low-down 
and high-brow in 
M-G-M’s Techni¬ 
color picture, "Hol¬ 
iday in Mexico." 


39 










U TAKES A BOW 


a conductor and composer (played by Philip Dorn) 
and his gifted pupil (Catherine McLeod) who loves 
him, but finally realizing that his intense egotism and 
absorption with his art make marriage a hopeless dream, 
marries her girlhood sweetheart (Bill Carter.) There’s 
liberal opportunity for the natural introduction of fine 
music in the story. The picture includes one hour and 
five minutes of “visual music” during which you will 
see Catherine McLeod at the piano, but you will be 
hearing Artur Rubinstein. He has made complete re¬ 
cordings of Rachmaninoff’s “Second Concerto,” Chopin’s 
“G-minor Ballade,” Beethoven’s “Appassionata Sonata,” 
Schuman’s “Concerto in A-minor,” Mendelssohn’s “Spin¬ 
ning Song,” as well as snatches from Wagner, Grieg 
and de Falla. 

Everybody at Republic is excited and thrilled over 
this production, especially Walter Scharf, director of 
music. He is positively bursting with enthusiasm, and 
can talk of nothing else. 

“This is the greatest wedding of dialogue and music,” 
he says, “that ha? yet been presented on the screen. 
There is a logical reason and motive for every musical 
number in it—nothing is dragged in by the heels. And 
in some parts, the music actually tells part of the story, 
advances the action, as in the scene where the girl, 
playing the Rachmaninoff Concerto in concert, is de¬ 
feated by the conductor, who becomes so jealous of 
her brilliant playing that he drowns her out with the 
orchestra. This takes the spirit out of her, and she 
finishes the concerto mechanically, not with the feeling 
she expressed when she started. There is not a word 
of explanation about this—it is all done with the music. 
Yet this episode is the crux of the whole story. Later, 
when she comes back as an older woman, she plays 
with him again, and defeats him at his own game. That 
victory is told entirely through the music, too. 

“It took a good deal of persuasion to get Rubinstein 
to do this picture,” Mr. Scharf went on “He was afraid 
the picture would be done with what is called the 
‘Hollywood finish’—that is, that musicians would be 
represented as unreasonable, eccentric people. He 
knows great musicians as normal human beings with 
great talent, and he wanted to be sure that they would 
be so represented on the screen, and not caricatured 
or distorted. What he wanted to do was to debunk 
his profession of eccen¬ 
tricity. 

“Once he was per¬ 
suaded this would be 
done, he entered into the 
spirit of the thing heart 
and soul, and lent his 
great imagination as well 
as his skill on the piano. 

For instance, in one re¬ 
cording of the Concerto, 

Rubinstein played it too 
fast, because he said the 
circumstances of that 
scene would make the 
girl nervous, and that’s 
the way she would play 
it. There’s another scene 
in which Philip Dorn asks 
the girl to play the Love 
Music from ‘Tristan and 
Isolde’ as background for 
a little romantic inter¬ 
lude he was planning 
with another woman on 


an adjoining balcony. Since the girl is secretly in love 
with him herself, Rubinstein said it would be natural 
for her to fumble the music a bit in this situation, so 
that’s the way he played it. 

“He even took great pains to help Catherine with 
her technique. He showed her many little tricks of 
fingering and hand-crossing, etc., which made her 
playing more showy and effective. Catherine has been 
studying music for eight years, and plays very well 
indeed. But never in her wildest dreams had she ever 
expected the opportunity to be coached by Artur 
Rubinstein. 

“We didn’t know just what to expect when he started 
working. The first day he came over to record, there 
was quite a feeling of apprehension on the recording 
stage where the 85 orchestra players sat waiting. Then 
Rubinstein came in, took off his coat, rolled up his 
sleeves and said, ‘All right—let’s start playing some 
music.’ From then on, he won everybody hands down 
with his simplicity and friendliness. He is absolutely 
free of egotism or affectation. He’s always critical of 
his own, and whenever he’d finish a number, he’d ask 
anxiously, ‘Did you like it?’ and was pleased as a child 
at our enthusiasm.” 

Apropos of Rubinstein’s modesty, they tell at Republic 
about the day when it had been arranged to play the 
completed recordings for Deems Taylor, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Rubinstein were to come with him. At the last 
minute, Rubinstein phoned Mr. Scharf to say, “I think 
I won’t come out after all. I think it seems just a little 
bit conceited to listen to my own recordings.” So the 
recordings were heard only by Mrs. Rubinstein and 
Mr. Taylor. 

Incidentally, one of Rubinstein’s favorite stories is 
about the time when he was giving a command per¬ 
formance for the then Prince of Wales in London. The 
piano was a priceless heirloom that was reserved for 
such special occasions. It was a beautiful instrument, 
but delicate—so delicate, in fact, that when the full 
force of Rubinstein’s tremendous strength descended 
upon it as he went into a crashing crescendo, the piano 
collapsed into a thousand pieces under those powerful 
hands. The concert ended abruptly, and in acute em¬ 
barrassment for Rubinstein. But the royal family took 
the incident in good spirit, and he said that for years 

after that, when he would 
meet the Prince of Wales, 
he would be greeted with, 
“Have you broken any 
pianos lately?” 

But to get back to Holly¬ 
wood, Walt Disney, who 
probably blazed this pres¬ 
ent musical trail in pic¬ 
tures with his “Fantasia” 
a few years ago, is now 
preparing a musical pot¬ 
pourri called “Make Mine 
Music,” which will meet 
all kinds of musical tastes. 
It has some very high- 
powered voices and instru¬ 
ments “ghost-starring” for 
the cartoons, the only live 
characters shown being 
David Lichine and Riabou- 
chinska, who do an ex¬ 
quisite dance number to 
“Two Silhouettes,” sung by 
(Continued on page 87) 



Artur Rubinstein "ghosts" for Catherine McLeod and Philip Dorn in 
Republic's Technicolor, "I've Always Loved You" (originally "Concerto"). 















She creates the most mischievous 

LOVE SITUATION IN HISTORY! 

{because she knows, but definitely, 
everything about love) 


The Year's Greatest Motion Picture Event 

NOEL COWARD’S 

Blithe Spirit 


in Blushing TECHNICOLOR 


How to kiss . . . and hold your man! 


How to stay in his life! 


How to make the competition look pale! 



Coming soon to your favorite theatre to bring you the best laughs ever! 







n 

j 


Music is now firmly planted on the top 
rung of the movie ladder—"not for Just 
a month, not for Just a year, but always" 


By GERTRUDE SIIA\KLI\ 

Gone with the wind are the days when music was 
just one of the props in movie-making. Today music 
often turns out to be the real star of the picture, no 
matter who gets the billing. 

Remember how the comments ran after “Song to 
Remember” hit the screen? “The music is perfectly 
wonderful!” people would say. “All that beautiful 
Chopin music was played by Jose Iturbi, you know. 
Merle Oberon never looked more beautiful, and of 
course Paul Muni and Cornel Wilde are excellent. 
It’s a grand picture.” 

All perfectly true, but you notice what always came 
in for first mention. Everybody and everything in that 
fine picture played second fiddle to the magnificent 
piano recording!. And ever since its release, folks who 
frankly say they don’t know Rimsky from Korsakov 
have been whistling polonaises while they work. 

Now, encouraged by the success of “Song,” Hollywood 
is breaking out in a perfect rash of musical pictures, 
featuring both classical and modern styles. And it’s 
a pretty safe bet that in each, the music will outshine 
the stars. 

One of the most ambitious of these is “I’ve Always 
Loved You” (formerly called “Concerto”) which repre¬ 
sents several “firsts” for Republic Studio. It’s Frank 
Borzage’s first production at that studio; it’s their first 
in Technicolor; it’s the first big acting opportunity for 
their new romantic team, Catherine McLepd and Bill 
Carter; and last but far from least, it’s the first full- 
length feature to present Artur Rubinstein’s music to 
the motion picture public. 

“I’ve Always Loved You” is a fictional story about 



- - ■ i Mil n i mail v7/ • v 

"Geetar" strummer Burl Ives sings Dinah ghost-stars for cartoon in 
h.s popular ballads in ,, Smolcy.'‘ Walt Disney’s "Make Mine Music." 




38 



















r 


TAKES A BOW 



Jose Iturbi tickles 
ivories low-down 
and liigh-brow in 
M-G-M's Techni¬ 
color picture, "Hol¬ 
iday in Mexico." 


39 









n 


H 



U T AKE S A BOW 


a conductor and composer (played by Philip Dorn) 
and his gifted pupil (Catherine McLeod) who loves 
him, but finally realizing that his intense egotism and 
absorption with his art make marriage a hopeless dream, 
marries her girlhood sweetheart (Bill Carter.) There’s 
liberal opportunity for the natural introduction of fine 
music in the story. The picture includes one hour and 
five minutes of “visual music” during which you will 
see Catherine McLeod at the piano, but you will be 
hearing Artur Rubinstein. He has made complete re¬ 
cordings of Rachmaninoff’s “Second Concerto,” Chopin’s 
“G-minor Ballade,” Beethoven’s “Appassionata Sonata,” 
Schuman’s “Concerto in A-minor,” Mendelssohn’s “Spin¬ 
ning Song,” as well as snatches from Wagner, Grieg 
and de Falla. 

Everybody at Republic is excited and thrilled over 
this production, especially Walter Scharf, director of 
music. He is positively bursting with enthusiasm, and 
can talk of nothing else. 

“This is the greatest wedding of dialogue and music,” 
he says, “that ha? yet been presented on the screen. 
There is a logical reason and motive for every musical 
number in it—nothing is dragged in by the heels. And 
in some parts, the music actually tells part of the story, 
advances the action, as in the scene where the girl, 
playing the Rachmaninoff Concerto in concert, is de¬ 
feated by the conductor, who becomes so jealous of 
her brilliant playing that he drowns her out with the 
orchestra. This takes the spirit out of her, and she 
finishes the concerto mechanically, not with the feeling 
she expressed when she started. There is not a word 
of explanation about this—it is all done with the music. 
Yet this episode is the crux of the whole story. Later, 
when she comes back as an older woman, she plays 
with him again, and defeats him at his own game. That 
victory is told entirely through the music, too. 

“It took a good deal of persuasion to get Rubinstein 
to do this picture,” Mr. Scharf went on “He was afraid 
the picture would be done with what is called the 
‘Hollywood finish’—that is, that musicians would be 
represented as unreasonable, eccentric people. He 
knows great musicians as normal human beings with 
great talent, and he wanted to be sure that they would 
be so represented on the screen, and not caricatured 
or distorted. What he wanted to do was to debunk 
his profession of eccen¬ 
tricity. 

“Once he was per¬ 
suaded this would be 
done, he entered into the 
spirit of the thing heart 
and soul, and lent his 
great imagination as well 
as his skill on the piano. 

For instance, in one re¬ 
cording of the Concerto, 

Rubinstein played it too 
fast, because he said the 
circumstances of that 
scene would make the 
girl nervous, and that’s 
the way she would play 
it. There’s another scene 
in which Philip Dorn asks 
the girl to play the Love 
Music from ‘Tristan and 
Isolde’ as background for 
a little romantic inter¬ 
lude he was planning 
with another woman on 


an adjoining balcony. Since the girl is secretly in love 
with him herself, Rubinstein said it would be natural 
for her to fumble the music a bit in this situation, so 
that’s the way he played it. 

“He even took great pains to help Catherine with 
her technique. He showed her many little tricks of 
fingering and hand-crossing, etc., which made her 
playing more showy and effective. Catherine has been 
studying music for eight years, and plays very well 
indeed. But never in her wildest dreams had she ever 
expected the opportunity to be coached by Artur 
Rubinstein. 

“We didn’t know just what to expect when he started 
working. The first day he came over to record, there 
was quite a feeling of apprehension on the recording 
stage where the 85 orchestra players sat waiting. Then 
Rubinstein came in, took off his coat, rolled up his 
sleeves and said, ‘All right—let’s start playing some 
music.’ From then on, he won everybody hands down 
with his simplicity and friendliness. He is absolutely 
free of egotism or affectation. He’s always critical of 
his own, and whenever he’d finish a number, he’d ask 
anxiously, ‘Did you like it?’ and was pleased as a child 
at our enthusiasm.” 

Apropos of Rubinstein’s modesty, they tell at Republic 
about the day when it had been arranged to play the 
completed recordings for Deems Taylor, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Rubinstein were to come with him. At the last 
minute, Rubinstein phoned Mr. Scharf to say, “I think 
I won’t come out after all. I think it seems just a little 
bit conceited to listen to my own recordings.” So the 
recordings were heard only by Mrs. Rubinstein and 
Mr. Taylor. 

Incidentally, one of Rubinstein’s favorite stories is 
about the time when he was giving a command per¬ 
formance for the then Prince of Wales in London. The 
piano was a priceless heirloom that was reserved for 
such special occasions. It was a beautiful instrument, 
but delicate—so delicate, in fact, that when the full 
force of Rubinstein’s tremendous strength descended 
upon it as he went into a crashing crescendo, the piano 
collapsed into a thousand pieces under those powerful 
hands. The concert ended abruptly, and in acute em¬ 
barrassment for Rubinstein. But the royal family took 
the incident in good spirit, and he said that for years 

after that, when he would 
meet the Prince of Wales, 
he would be greeted with, 
“Have you broken any 
pianos lately?” 

But to get back to Holly¬ 
wood, Walt Disney, who 
probably blazed this pres¬ 
ent musical trail in pic¬ 
tures with his “Fantasia” 
a few years ago, is now 
preparing a musical pot¬ 
pourri called “Make Mine 
Music,” which will meet 
all kinds of musical tastes. 
It has some very high- 
powered voices and instru¬ 
ments “ghost-starring” for 
the cartoons, the only live 
characters shown being 
David Lichine and Riabou- 
chinska, who do an ex¬ 
quisite dance number to 
“Two Silhouettes,” sung by 
(Continued on page 87) 


i 



Artur Rubinstein "ghosts" for Catherine McLeod and Philip Dorn in 
Republic's Technicolor, "I've Always Loved You" (originally "Concerto"). 


40 












NOEL COWARD’S 

Blithe Spirit 


She creates the most mischievous 

LOVE SITUATION IN HISTORY! 

(because she knows, hut definitely, 
everything about love) 


Hou> to kiss . . . and hold your man! 


Hoic to stay in his life! 


How to make the competition look pale! 



in Blushing TECHNICOLOR 


Coming soon to your favorite theatre to bring you the best laughs ever! 













By MARCIA DAVGHTREV 


mM/Ju 

IX TOWIN’ 


Margaret a singing hit in N. Y., while Bill waits for news of 
Prince role in "Anna and King of Siam." They may wed in N. Y. 

i 


Exclusive boy meets girl story. 

The boy. Bill Eythe; the girl, 

Margaret Whiting. It’s love! 


Bill Eythe sauntered onto the set where he is working in 20th Century-Fox’s 
“Centennial Summer” and was greeted by a lissome-eyed Miss Barbara 
Whiting whom you undoubtedly recall as the laconic Fuffy in “Junior Miss.” 

“Hi, droop,” quoth she to Mr. Eythe. “I heard on the radio last night that 
you’re calc’lating on marrying my sister.” 

“That’s what I hear, too,” grinned Bill. 

Responded Miss B. Whiting with hauteur, “Fine thing. I thought you were 
going to wait for me.” 

“I may at that. You see, the announcement of our impending nuptials 
was made before I had been consulted, and before I (Continued on page 74) 


43 








PREDICTS 



I 



SANDRA, favorite entertainer of pre-war Holly¬ 
wood, has been occupied with war work in England, 
Bermuda and California since September, 1939. As a 
hobby, she has used her free time in an effort to con¬ 
tact future events by concentration.- Among startling 
results obtained by this new method during 1944 was 
her prediction, placed on record in April, 1944, that 
General MacArthur would land in the Philippines in 
October of that year, and her prediction, made in No¬ 
vember, 1944, that Japan would be conquered in 
August, 1945. 

This latter forecast was made during an experiment 
on which notes were taken and copies forwarded to 
other interested parties. The paragraph reads: 

“Although China is in such a terrible state, the 
Japanese will not be able to make a great change 
in the country. There will be a withdrawal of 
Allied armies to Burma, but for such a short time 
that victory for the Japanese will mean little, since 
the country will be taken back much faster than 
it has been lost. Japan will fall and the Japanese 
will withdraw to their own (Continued on page 88) 


I 


J 


I 

I 



Dana Andrews has 3 children; Sandra predicts another daughter. 


What does I ho \ew Year hold 
for your favorite star? A 
romance, mayho ... or marriage, 
or divorce. a family addition. 





"Watch your step, Stack!" (With E. Williams & B. Gage.) 


44 


















45 












By MICKELL NOVAK 


i 

i 



First film bit was with Garbo in 
"Camille." She starred at sixteen! 


THE STORY SO FAR: An abundantly-talented, 
red-headed kid named Joan Leslie debuted pro¬ 
fessionally at the fragile age of two in a song- 
and-dance act with her sisters, Mary and Betty 
Brodel. After playing vaudeville houses and 
night clubs of note in the Eastern states, Joan 
was picked up and signed overnight by a talent 
scout on the MGM payroll. Her first bit was in 
the great Garbo’s “Camille,” after which Joan 
was lost in the Hollywood shuffle until her small 
but forceful performance in Warner’s “Nancy 
Drew, Reporter,” forced a long awaited contract 
out of that studio. 

At sixteen she played the lead opposite Gary 
Cooper. Since then, she has worked with such 
intrepid troupers as Fred MacMurray, Jack 
Carson, Fred Astaire, Eddie Cantor, Dennis 
Morgan and James Cagney. 

A LOOK AT TODAY: Through sheer hard 
work, ability, and more work, Joan has now 
won for herself the coveted title role in “Marilyn 
Miller.” This is undoubtedly the biggest job of 
her career. She is tackling the intricacies of 
recreating a remembered and beloved stage 
figure with her usual sober conscientiousness. 

On the day the studio handed her the part, 
she girded her loins with the traditional tutu, 
and began working with ballet-master Robert 
(Buddy) Eson in order to learn the fine points 
of toe work, for which Marilyn Miller was so 
famous. With Eson she has worked out as 
rigorous a dance schedule as ever confronted a 
pupil at the renowned St. Petersburg Imperial 
Ballet School. 

A day with Leslieskaya, as Buddy calls her, is 
exhausting even to mere spectators. At 10:00 
sharp every morning, Joan reports for rehearsal 
and puts in a good hour and a half of toe and 
soft-shoe ballet. Then comes lunch. Just thirty 
minutes of resting her feet high against a wall 
while she juggles a salad and makes shop talk 
with Buddy. After lunch there is tap work until 
tea time, then an hour of ballet technique to 
round out the schedule. 

Eson, once a member of the Metropolitan 
Opera Ballet, partner to Mme. Fokina, and 
dancer with Adolph Bolm and Albertina Rasch, 
knows good technique when he sees it. And 
apparently he sees it sticking out all over La 
Leslie,'because this is what he says about her: 

“I believe Joan is the only star in pictures 
who is able to do ballet and toe as well as 
dramatic work. I definitely think she has possi¬ 
bilities of becoming a great ballerina, if she is 
given the chance to keep up her work. And 
I’ve never seen a girl with such a great capacity 
for work. If she isn’t perfect in every move¬ 
ment, she repeats it over and over until it is 
perfect. She drives herself constantly.” 

LESLIE AT WORK: When mass picketing 
closed the studio’s doors (Continued on page 92) 



46 
















Red hair, hazel eyes, height 5’ 4". Idea of a good time: to go to the movies! 



Triple threat Joan Leslie: actress. 

singer and dancer, gets the coveted 
role in Warners’ "Marilyn Miller” 


47 















Bv IlltlW IIOMFVV 


48 







February 21, 19If5 

Well, Miss Judith Ann, my sub-deb daughter, I feel it 
necessary to call your attention to a certain milestone in 
your career. Yesterday you were two years old; a won¬ 
derful age. You are almost able to dress yourself without 
aid. It takes you hours to do it, of course, but the essential 
capability is there—modified by lethargy. 

And you talk! How you talk! And the things you say! 

Yesterday, among your other birthday guests, was a 
brother and sister. The sister is an Older Woman of five, 
but the brother is 2Vz, just the right age for you at present. 
When these two youngsters came to tell you goodbye at 
the close of festivities, each kissed your cheek in farewell. 

Afterward, I said to you, “Those two children are very 
nice, aren’t they?” This was done in one of my occasional 
parental attempts to teach you to speak well of your guests. 

You looked up at me and said (Continued on page 80) 


McGinty, -fem’ale boxer pup, brings up the rear! 


49 













Every time you’re sitting in a theatre 
and burst out into a guffaw of laughter, 
you’re buying something that psycholo¬ 
gists say is more important than cars, 
clothes, or any of the most expensive 
finery. 

Ask your doctor. He’ll recommend a 
good laugh as the “finest medicine.” Psy¬ 


chiatrists agree that more laughter means 
fewer worries, fewer wars, less suffering 
and more all-around happiness. 

Laughter is a big business. Millions 
upon millions of dollars go into that busi¬ 
ness every year. Movie-makers see the 
value of laughter, hence the high salaries 
which are paid (Continued on page 66) 



Olsen and Johnson get their laughs at the expense of someone else. 
Theory started in vodvil days when a spectator "heckled” their act. 



1 J / 

f;/T 7. 

[ 4 ) ^ - 



lUv-r: 



Abbott & Costello: classic examples of the old "fall-guy" routine. 
The burley-clowns will be seen in Universal's "On The Carpet." 


i 


It takes millions of dollars to 

tickle the funnybones of 
1’. S. moviegoers. Laugh that off! 










wm 




mm 

llfel 

W w 


i—^;<.»KftiifiWi'irii m 


Everything’s Fine (Sylvia) with Danny. 
Next pic, Kid From Brooklyn," Goldwyn. 


V 


ISA 
SERIOUS 
BUSINESS 


51 











„ 04. 

»*#$&%?$*** 

u1 i4« T *#T&. 


<8 


S^ d ° 




,le»fJ!>'^S 


v,e 4VS ' 
V " e ^ «0 


5' \ wV^el P» bet'N'foi 5 1 4 pv«- lV , - ^ #• ^ 

** ft’e* W - *> 


I* 


\oo^- 


\%oU 

a^^tu 3.. 


^ e . ^^e^Co- 


.X -UO-U ^ 

^ ^‘e& ^;> 11 r'\i°^oV^ et 

cD**fg*»o* 


Bv Kdilh H«*a«l 




*o 


*\o«" c 


„ &***£* "*'' 
*:> ek 


o* 


. o^ ofQ 
»«*° ,oO»- 

A *°* 


As, \° 0t 

«tS **’• 













53 












WORDS 4 

MUSIC 


By JILL WARREN 


t Mercer and Jo Stafford register approval of a new arrangement. 

; on Jill's Saturday Senior Swing Show: Charlie Spivak and son. 
ed Pipers: Hal Hopper, Chuck Lowry, Jane Hutton, Clark Yocum, 
ating is going up. Stan Kenton, June Christy and Gene Howard. 


Greetings, lads and lassies, and a 
Happy 1946! 

The big news of the new year is 
that there will onoe again be a 
Glenn Miller Orchestra. It will 
be fronted by Tex Beneke, 
who recently finished a three year 
stretch in the Navy as a Chief Petty 
Officer. Tex was chosen as the leader 
because Glenn had planned to back him 
with a band of his own, just before 
the war. Mrs. Miller and Glenn’s 
manager, Don Haynes, are carrying 
out all the plans Glenn formulated 
for his postwar band, before his 
untimely disappearance December 
15, 1944. Every musician in the new 
orchestra will be an ex-serviceman, 
and the arrangements will be pat¬ 
terned after (Continued on page 58) 


54 













Jeanne Craine and Paul Brooks, Mocambo. 



Bill and Brenda Holden, the Greg Pecks. 



John Payne, Gloria DeHaven, at LaRues. 



Yep, it's getting to be Hollywood again, 
thank goodness. 

FOUR OF A KIND IS ALSO A FULL HOUSE: 

Almost three years ago, when Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Young were gifted by the stork 
with their third daughter, Eddie Cantor 
wired: "Ha . . . Ha ... Ha." And in 
November, when the Youngs parented their 
fourth daughter, they received the follow¬ 
ing telegram, "Ha . . . Ha . . . Ha . . . Ha." 
Will forward fifth Ha in about three years." 

ENDEARING YOUNG CHARMS: 

Harry James has a pretty wit; with a 
perfectly straight face he delivers some of 
the best' lines in Hollywood. It is a quality 
that long ago assisted in endearing him to 
his laughter-loving wife. Not long since, 
the James' saw a private showing of "The 
Dolly Sisters." As you probably remember, 
the early shots of the sisters showed them 
as tow-headed youngsters just come from 
the old country; these scenes were en¬ 
acted by two kindergarten actresses. 

At the end of the picture, Betty turned to 
her husband to ask, "Well, what did you 
think of it?" 

Decided Harry solemnly, "It's a fine pic¬ 
ture, but your best scenes are those of you 
as a child!" 

LONG LANE—QUICK TURNING: 

Dick Lane, promising young actor, has 
been telling this one on himself: it seems that 
when the cigarette shortage was at its most 
stringent, he espied a line on Hollywood 
Boulevard and scat-quick fell in. He had 
worked his way forward for almost a block 
when he discovered that he was queued 
up to get Alan Ladd's autograph. 

THE RAINBOW BLUES: 

Although, when it is "finished, the new 
home of Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Powell (Dick and 
June to you) will be a medley of soft and 
lovely colors, at present it is giving, them 
nothing but the blues. Dick started the re¬ 
modeling of the house in May, 1945. He and 
June had hoped to move in sometime in 
October. But many difficulties intervened, 
among which was an unseasonable hot 
spell. When the mercury went up, the 
painters went away . . . fishing. They said 
over their departing shoulders that they 
would just knock off for a few days, until 
the heat wave passed. They were gone 
three weeks. 

Meanwhile, because of the housing 
shortage and the teeming hotel situation 
(which allows a guest to remain for one 
week only) June and Dick have been leaping 
from hotel to hotel, from friend's home to 
stranger's guest house, from borrowed 
apartment to studio dressing room. Know 
anybody with two piano boxes for rent? 

RATTLE: 

You needn't believe this if you’d rather 
not, but Van Johnson has actually received 


a complete human skeleton from a fan who 
mailed it to MGM. Only sensible fact to be 
gleaned from this absurd situation is that 
Van is probably one of the two dozen stars 
in town who doesn't have this commodity, 
or reasonably exact facsimile, already hang¬ 
ing in some dark closet. 

SETTLED BILL: 

Working with Edward G. Robinson, Joan 
Bennett and Dan Duryea in "Scarlet Street" 
was a parrot with a message. Each time 
a scene was ready to be shot the parrot had 
something to say that would have set the 
Hayes office back twenty years. The bird 
was needed in the scenes for plot purposes, 
but he was needed without ad libs, so the 
makeup man clapped a length of adhesive 
tape around the bird's bill, then painted the 
tape with makeup so that it didn't show. 
This is probably the first instance in Holly¬ 
wood history of parroted lines having been 
muzzled. 

/ 

PROFIT WITHOUT HONOR: 

June Allyson was somewhat bewildered 
by her younger brother's frantic and oft- 
repeated requests for large numbers of each 
of her latest studio portraits. "Anything new. 
Sis?" he wrote. "If so, please send me a 
dozen at once." 

A recent letter from a New York fan ex¬ 
plained the mystery: brother Arthur has been 
selling pictures of his famous sister for 
twenty-five cents each. 

MOST UNKINDEST CUT OF ALL: 

Guy Madison, emerging from the shower, 
slipped on the itinerant soap and plunged 
through the glass shower door, cutting his hip, 
his hands, his face and his shoulder. The 
shoulder wound was the most serious, requir¬ 
ing seventeen stitches. He was out of " 'Till 
The End Of Time" for almost a month, as a 
result of the accident. It has been the policy 
of studios in the past promptly to ban that 
activity which has wounded one of its, stars, 
as witness the edicts against flying planes 
during picture production, riding motorcycles, 
skiing or even enjoying a brisk canter on 
horseback. The studio is thinking this one 
over. 

TAPS: 

Henry Armetta had been ill for some time, 
but he was enthusiastic about a new play 
named "Opening Night" in which he was 
to star. So, trouper to his last breath, he 
went to San Diego where the vehicle was 
to be tried out before showing in Los An¬ 
geles. Standing in the wings was Henry's 
son, John Armetta, an army discharge in 
his pocket. 

But the cue that Henry Armetta answered 
was not that spoken from the stage, but one 
called from Infinity. He died as he had lived: 
with an audience awaiting the superb per¬ 
formance for which he had become famous 
and well loved. 


The End 
















t 


READING 


WRITING 


By HELEN KIX€» 


Ingrid plays psychiatrist 
in "Spellbound," flirt in 
"Saratoga Trunk," nun in 
The Bells of St. Mary’s." 


The illustrated signature of Ingrid 
Bergman, one of movieland’s finest 
actresses, may be a fascinating addi¬ 
tion to the collection of autograph 
hunters—but it is more than that to a 
graphologist. It is a chance to look 
‘‘behind the scenes” of the lady’s 
character; it is a clue to what Ingrid 
really thinks. 

Much has been rumored about the 
possibility of Miss Bergman’s return 
to her native country at some future 
time; but if she does go she will take 
a little bit of the United States with 
her, for Ingrid Bergman’s writing 
shows she has,taken on many of the 
characteristics of her new country¬ 
men! Her writing is almost as Ameri¬ 
can as that of Clark Gable. 

Handwriting depicts character, 
whether it be national characteristics, 
emotional characteristics or vocational 
aptitudes. It tells how much we have 
progressed, how much we have added 
to our nature through the years. In¬ 
grid Bergman’s signature has 13 let¬ 
ters ‘in it, and only one shows the 
influence of her native country! The 
“e” is the sole clue. All the rest have 
an American style. 

But let’s look at it for character, 
and compare it with your own—for 
you, too, may have many similar 
traits. The slant of the writing, many 
degrees to the right, tells us that Miss 
Bergman is an exceedingly affection¬ 
ate and sympathetic young lady. She 
needs friendship, people and under¬ 
standing. That tightly closed “d”, 
however, tells us she will be rather 
reserved, and that only a few will 
ever really know her inner warmth. 

The capital "I” reflects her person¬ 
ality—striving to improve alL the time. 


independent in thought, yet without 
any aggressiveness. She will retain 
her own thoughts, but will respect 
your right to contradict her! The 
capital “B” is unusual, in that its first 
stroke—or its “left side”—is made up 
of the preceding letter. No, it isn’t 
economy; it’s originality that makes 
her do it. She is rapid in thought, 
creative, and usually quick to arrive 
at a decision. 

Two “n’s” are found in the signature, 
and both different. The first is rhyth¬ 
mic, the second written rapidly. Oddly 
enough this is a combination found in 
so many American writings; young 
people start out with the rhythmic 
letter and, as they get impatient, write 
faster and faster until finally all their 
“n’s” show the pointed effect. The two 
“g’s” when written with a reversed 
loop (like a q, instead of a g) reflect 
altruism. Miss Bergman not only 
gives of herself, her possessions, but 
she usually thinks generously about 
others too. There will be little gossip 
going on with her around! 

That rather tall, pointed “r” is in¬ 
dicative of pride; a desire to do a 
thing well or not at all. The second 
“r” is again in the category of the fast- 
writer. Obviously Miss Bergman starts 
out slowly and, like a snowball going 
downhill, gathers momentum along 
the way. As for the “i”, note how far 
away the dot is from the letter itself. 
Curiosity! A desire to know more of 
what is going on. But Miss Bergman 
is a cautious soul; she thinks twice be¬ 
fore she acts. And the clue which 
gives her away is that dash at the end 
of her name—that long line after the 
final “n.” It is comparable to the 
cautiousness surrounding the person 


who makes long lines after amounts 
on checks, to insure non-tampering. 

Miss Bergman’s top quality is sin¬ 
cerity. Her “worst fault,” according 
to this signature, is in being too sensi¬ 
tive—for therein she is often hurt un¬ 
reasonably. 


Do you cross your t’s when you 
come to them? Do you build a 
tent over your i’s in place of a 
dot? Do you forget to close the 
loops in your o’s? From such 
tiny clues, 29-year-old Helen 
King, past president of the 
American Graphological Society, 
and leader of the nation’s Sher- 
locks of scribbles, can read your 
character with uncanny accu¬ 
racy. Dynamic, merry and as¬ 
sured, she has helped the New 
York police with countless cases, 
written syndicated newspaper 
columns, magazine articles, 
broadcast for several years, and 
analyzed more than a million 
and a half persons’ handwriting. 


j DON'T CLIP THIS COUPON! 

Unless you want Helen King to tell you what secret 
I are revealed by your handwriting. If so—if you want 
I a personal handwriting analysis from one of the fore 
j most American graphology experts -send this coupon. 
I together with 25c and a sample of your penmanship. 
| to Helen King, care of MOVIELAND MAGAZINE. 535 
J Fifth Ave., New York 17. N. Y. Enclose a stamped. 
■ self-addressed envelope. You will receive a personal 
| analysis—no form letters! 

j NAME. 

I ADDKESS... 

I hereby grant permission for my handwriting analysis 
I to be published in a future Issue of MOV IELANI) 
J (Indicate Yes or No). 


57 









WORDS OF MUSIC 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 541 


the Miller Army band. The band 
will be composed of five saxophones, 
four trombones, four trumpets, nine 
violins, two violas, one cello, a French 
horn, four rhythm and a vocal 
quintet. 

After many delays, Buddy Rich 
finally left Tommy Dorsey and .was 
replaced by Alvin Stoller, Charlie 
Spivak’s drummer. At long last, 
Buddy is getting his own band to¬ 
gether, and Frank Sinatra is supply¬ 
ing a goodly portion of the bankroll. 
The Rich outfit will play some one- 
nighters first and then probably open 
in an Eastern dance spot, possibly 
the Terrace Room in Newark, New 
Jersey. 

Bob Crosby is out of the Marines 
and is reorganizing his orchestra on 
the West Coast. He’ll undoubtedly 
have a complete new personnel, be¬ 
cause Eddie Miller and Ray Badauc 
now have bands of their own, and 
most of the original Crosby men are 
with Eddie or Ray. 

WHAT'S BRISK ON THE DISC: 
COLUMBIA: 

The Modernaires, with Paula Kelly, 
have recorded the pretty “Autumn 
Serenade’’ and a cute, new novelty, 
“Coffee Five, Doughnuts Five,” with 
Mitchell Ayres’ orchestra. 

Sweet and hot would be a good de¬ 
scription of Gene Krupa’s latest. On 
the hot side we find Anita O’Day 
bouncing through the zany “Chickery 
Chick,” and then on the softer side 
of things, Buddy Stewart sings “Just 
a Little Fond Affection.” 

Doris Day does double duty with 
Les Brown and his orchestra on “You 
Won’t Be Satisfied” and “Come to 
Baby, Do.” 

Frankie Carle and his orchestra are 
represented with “Don’t You Remem¬ 
ber Me” with a Paul Allen vocal, and 
“Prove It By The Things You Do,” 
sung by Marjorie Hughes, Frankie’s 
daughter. (This is her first record 
with the band.) 

The oT professor, Kay Kyser, has 


waxed “Coffee Time” from “Yolanda 
and The Thief” and “Angel.” Lucy- 
ann Polk, one of the Town Criers, and 
Michael Douglas handle the lyrics on 
the first side and Michael, and The 
Campus Kids double up on the sec¬ 
ond. 

One of the best records Frank 
Sinatra has ever made is his new one, 
“The House I Live In,” and “Ameri¬ 
ca, the Beautiful.” Axel Stordahl’s 
orchestra, as' usual. 

VICTOR: 

Here, at last, is Duke Ellington’s 
“Black, Brown and Beige” album. 
It’s a tone poem done in four parts— 
“Work,” “Come Sunday,” “The 
Blues,” and “West Indian Dance.” 
They are original Ellington composi¬ 
tions and are all-instrumental, except 
for a Joya Sherill vocal on “The 
Blues.” This album is a must if you 
like Ellington. 

MAJESTIC: 

Phil Regan, with the assistance of 
a Male Quartet, sings the title' song 
from his Monogram picture, “Sun- 
bonnet Sue,” and “By The Light Of 
The Silvery Moon.” 

If you want a slight bit of corn, the 
Korn Kobblers have just the thing in 
“I Don’t Care If I Never Go To Bed” 
and “Our Red Hen.” 

Louis Prima, whose records are top 
sellers all over the country, has a new 
one which will go fast, “Some Sunday 
Morning” and “Let It Snow, Let It 
Snow, Let- It Snow.” 

DECCA: 

The Andrews Sisters are right in 
their element with their new one, 
“Put That Ring On My Finger” and 
“The Welcome Song.” Incidentally, 
the girls recently recorded two tunes 
with- Guy Lombardo’s Orchestra. 

For his first solo record, Bob Eberly 
sings “As Long As I Live” and “Goin’ 
Home,” both from “Saratoga Trunk.” 

That popular Western singer, Jim¬ 
my Wakely, and that popular tenor 
saxophone man, Eddie Miller, get to¬ 
gether for “I’ve Got Nuggets In My 



The Andrews Sisters and Jill Warren, looking so-o-o happy after the broadcast of the 
"Saturday Senior Swing" show, over the American Broadcasting Company network. 



Frances Langford and hubby, Jon Hall. Her 
next picture, "The Bamboo Blonde," for RKO. 


Pockets” and “Too Bad Little Girl, 
Too Bad.” 

A1 Jolson, who hasn’t made a rec¬ 
ord in ages, has waxed two of 
the tunes which helped to make 
him famous, “Swannee” and “April 
Showers.” 

Bing Crosby is in for two platters 
this time. First he teams with Jim- 
•my Dorsey for “Give Me The Simple 
Life” and the oldie “It’s The Talk Of 
The Town,” and then with Victor 
Young’s orchestra he does “Sym¬ 
phony” and “Beautiful Love.” 

Here’s another Gershwin Album— 
and this time it’s called “Jazz Con¬ 
cert,” with Eddie Condon and his or¬ 
chestra, and such fine instrumental¬ 
ists as Jack Teagarden, Bobby Hack- 
ett, Max Kaminsky and Billy Butter¬ 
field. Eight sides in all, including 
“Somebody Loves Me”, sung by Tea¬ 
garden, and “The Man I Love”, with a 
wonderful Lee Wiley vocal. 
CAPITOL: 

The Pied Pipers have done a swell 
job on the cute tune, “In The Middle 
of May” and “Aren’t You Glad You’re 
You”, with Paul Weston’s orchestra. 

“Come To Baby, Do” and “The Frim 
Fram Sauce” are the titles of a swell 
new King Trio platter. 

Jo Stafford and Paul Weston’s or¬ 
chestra have turned out a fine coup¬ 
ling in “Symphony” and “Day By 
Day”. Incidentally, the “Day” tune 
was written by Paul, Axel Stordahl 
and Sammy Cahn, the same trio who 
were responsible for “I Should Care”. 

Johnnie Johnston’s fans should be 
pleased as punch with his rendition of 
“One More Dream” (And She’s Mine) 
and “As Long As I Live”. Lloyd 
Shaffer’s orchestra and The Satisfiers 
vocal group give the musical assist¬ 
ance. Johnnie starts his first picture 
for M.G.M. any day now. 

.Stan Kenton, whose band is rapidly 
rising in popularity, is in with “Ar¬ 
tistry Jumps”, a fast instrumental 
based °,P his theme, “Artistry in 
Rhythm , and a swingy thinev bv 
Ellington called “Just A-SittiF and 
A-Rockm which June Christy sings. 


58 












* ec °rd, yo 

>r C °Pitol 

di ° w 
>r >nstance 


MERCER,, 

so, >gwrif er 

9' y es with i 

hits , 

new 


VVE 

C opitol'i w ,Sc overy 

r^: 

Ml P°ce i„ 

llllft s ong 


lend ' d b midweste' n r° d, °- 
nOUS ".ftSdlM " a T 

s forre" s lus hi 

' tpr rrtf^ w,nk 

Ch C from Hollywoc 
m ony Hits i Re corc! 


ARE YOU HIP to the latest news 
about records, bands, singers, 
tunes? You are if you read "The 
Capitol, - Hollywood's smart, 
sparkling newsmagazine. It's free 
—at your record dealer's. 


* i 




SUNSET AND VINE 


59 






















“Sr" RECORDS 

A Selection of the Favorites 


□ Symphony; In The Middle Of May—Freddy Mar¬ 
tin—53e 

□ Put It There; Road To Morocco—Bing Crosby 
with Bob Hope—$1.05 

□ Love Letters; Till The End Of Time—Dick 
Haymes—53c 

□ How Deep Is The Ocean; Stumpy—Coleman 
Hawkins—$1.05 

□ Get Happy; Crazy Rhythm—Coleman Hawkins— 
$1.05 

□ Skyscraper; Pappilloma—Flip Phillips—$1.05 

□ Lonely Serenade; Laura—Johnny Bothwell—79c 

□ The Trouble With Me Is You; John’s Other Wife 
—Johnny Bothwell—79c 

□ III Wind; I’ll Remember April—Johnny Both¬ 
well—79c 

□ Bosco and His Doghouse; Frantic Rhapsody—Bill 
Stegmier—79c 

□ Dig You Later (A Hubba-Hubba-Hubba); Here 
Comes Heaven Again—Perry Como—53c 

□ Rachmaninoff Concerto Na. 2; I’m Glad I Waited 
For You—Freddie Martin—53c 

□ The Darktown Poker Club; Jelly Bean — Phil 
Harris—89c 

□ Tieo-Tico; The Shrimp Man—The Ginger Snaps 
—53e 

□ Hora Staccato; Meadowland—Fred Waring—79c 

□ Clair De Lune; Liebestraum—Jose Iturbi—12"— 
$1.05 

□ Chopin’s Polonnaise—Jose Iturbi—12"—$1.05 

□ Chicery Chick—I Lost My Job Again—Sammy 
K aye—53c 

□ The Blonde Sailor; Silk Umbrella Polka—Henri 
Rene and Musettes—79c 

□ Out Of Nowhere; Hong Kong Blues—T. Dorsey— 

53c 

□ Prove It By The Things You Do; Drifting Along 
—Erskine Hawkins—53e 

□ The Man I Love; Do It Again—Dinah Shore— 
53c 


□ Blue Skies: How Deep Is The Ocean—Carl 
Ravazza—53c 

□ Liza: I Got Rhythm—Ethel (Organ) Smith—79c 

□ Something Sentimental; Down In Chi Chi Hotchi 
Watchi—Vaughn Monroe—53c 

□ Swinging The Boogie; Just A Little Bluesie— 
Hadda Brooks—$1.05 

□ Boogie Woogie; There You Go—Tommy Dorsey— 
53c 

□ China Stomp; Rhythm. Rhythm—Lionel Hamp¬ 
ton—53c 

□ Little Joe Boogie; Drag ’Em—Mary Lou Williams 
12"—$1.05 

□ That First Love Of Mine: Sittin’ By That Old 
Corral—Montana Slim—37c 

□ Sugar Blues; Tear It Down—Clyde McCoy—37c 

□ Ave Maria; Aufenhalt—Marian Anderson—12"— 
$1.05 

□ Jingle Bells Swing; Santa Claus Is Cornin’ To 
Town Swing—T. Dorsey. B. Goodman—53c 
Dancin’ Shoes Polka; Jolly Inn Polka—The 
Bohemians—79c 


□ Song To Remember Album—Jose Iturbi—$1.84 

□ Hot Piano Album Featuring Johnny Guarnieri— 
$3.78 

□ Square Dance Album with Woodhall Old Tymers 
—with calls—$3.68 


□ Slcppy Lagoon; Holiday For Strings—Spike Jones 
—53c 


□ Al Goodman’s Album of Chopin’s Music—$2.63 


FREE Catalogue of records and albums with 
every order. 


Cheek the Records You Want — 

ORDER BY MAIL! 

We ship records around the corner or around 
the world. Three or more records shipped C.O.D., 
express insured. All orders shipped same day 
as received. NO PACKING CHARGES. All 
orders outside of TJ.S.A. must be accompanied 
by cash. 



53 Clinton Ave., So. 
Rochester 4, N. Y. 


One of the largest Popular, Hot Jazz, 
Boogie Woogie and Classical Record 
Stocks in the entire U. S. A. 


JAM NOTES: 

Johnny Desmond, who was dubbed 
the “G.I. Sinatra” when he sang with 
the Glenn Miller band overseas, is out 
of the service, and is starring on his 
own radio show over NBC. He signed 
a-contract to record for Victor, too . . . 
Also back on the civilian list are 
Kenny Gardner, who sang with Guy 
Lombardo before he went into the 
service, and Jack Leonard. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer has signed 
Frankie “Sugar-Foot” Robinson, the 
sensational six-year-old boogie 
woogie pianist from Detroit. He’ll 
make his first appearance in “No 
Leave, No Love” . . . Jimmy Dorsey’s 
new vocalist, Dee Parker, is the same 
girl who sang with Vaughn Monroe a 
year or so ago under the name of Del 
Parker . . . Artie Shaw has broken up 
his band again and this time says he 
is going to concentrate on becoming a 
movie producer . . . Carmen Cavalero 
will head his own radio show soon. 

When Louis Prima played in New¬ 
ark, New Jersey, he sent the follow¬ 
ing letter to all the schools in the 
vicinity: “Dear Boys and Girls—May 
I ask your cooperation in not cutting 
class to see my shows at the Adams• 

■ Theater? I have arranged my.sched¬ 
ule to permit your attendance during 
the late afternoons, evenings, and all¬ 
day of the weekend. Whereas I deeply 
appreciate your anxiety to see and 
hear my orchestra, and am greatly 
flattered, you have a civic obligation 
not to miss any school sessions. Thank 
you, and I’ll be seeing you.- Your pal, 
Louis Prima” . . . 

The Ford Motor Company is the lat¬ 
est sponsor who wants Judy Garland 
for a radio show. But the bets are on 
that Metro again will nix any regular 
air program for her . . . Danny O’Neil 
signed a five-year contract with Ma¬ 
jestic Records, and they are planning 
a big buildup for him. Danny is one 
singer who really deserves his suc¬ 
cess; he’s one of the nicest guys In the 
business . . . Sally Stuart, who left the 
Sammy Kaye band a few months ago 
because of illness, is fully recovered 
and is back in New York doing radio 
work. Speaking of Sammy, his “Sun¬ 
day Serenade Book of Poems” has 
sold more than sixty thousand copies 
to date. If you want a copy and 
haven’t been able to find it in your 
local book store, write to 607 Fifth 
Avenue, New York. 

Spike Jones and his City Slickers 
have been signed by Paramount for 
the Eddie Bracken picture, “Ladies’ 
Man”, and Spike gets a chance to act 
besides make noises . . . Tommy Mor¬ 
gan and Johnny Long are parting 
company. They are still friends, but 
Tommy is quitting because he never 
gets a chance to make records. Decca 
usually has Dick Robertson sing the 
vocals on Johnny’s discs . . . Margaret 
Whiting, whose terrific record of “It 
Might As Well Be Spring” made her 
on overnight sensation, and Bill Eythe 
Twentieth-Century-Fox’s young star’ 
may be Mr. and Mrs. very soon. 


Well, so much for now. See you 
next month. In the meantime if 
you have any musical questions, 
drop me a line and I’ll do my best 
to answer you. Just be sure to 
enclose a SELF-ADDRESSED 
ENVELOPE. Write to Jill War¬ 
ren, Movieland Magazine, 535 
Fifth Avenue, New York 17, New I 

York. 


f CONTINUED FROM PAGE 231 

BLACK MARKET BABIES (Monogram) 

exposes another racket that flourished 
during the war years. A notorious 
gang promotes a deal whereby babies 
are sold without having the mother 
sign necessary release papers. With 
Ralph Morgan, Kane Richmond, Teala 
Morgan, Marjorie Hoshelle and others. 
STRANGER OF THE SWAMP (PRC) is 
an unpleasant ghost who manages to 
make the townspeople of a little 
swampland community very uneasy 
by strangling his victims. Before the 
population suffers a great decrease, 
he’s exorcised. Cast includes Rose¬ 
mary LaPlanche, Robert Barratt, 
Blake Edwards and Charles Mid¬ 
dleton. 

FEAR (Monogram) drives Peter Cook- 
son to kill a man (Francis Pierlot); 
and fear makes him confess his crime. 
Warren William plays detective again, 
Anne Gwynne tries to be a good influ¬ 
ence on the killer, and James Card- 
well, Nestor Paiva and Almira Ses¬ 
sions fill the billings! 

OUT OF THE DEPTHS (Columbia) comes 
a U. S. submarine, replete with crew, 
consisting of Jim Bannon, Ross Hun¬ 
ter, Ken Curtis, Loren Tindall, Robert 
Scott and Frank Sully. The place is 
the Pacific. The target—Tokyo! No 
women are found wanted in this all- 
ma l e cast 

DON’T FENCE ME IN (Republic)— Roy 

Rogers, of the great open spaces, ap¬ 
pears as Gabby Hayes’ guardian angel 
when Dale Evans, star reporter of a 
national picture magazine, goes west 
to photograph and investigate the 
“mysterious” disappearance of a color¬ 
ful character, “Wildcat Kelly.” Trig¬ 
ger and the Sons of the Pioneers are 
in there pitching, too. 

SHADOW OF A WOMAN (Warner Bros.), 
with Helmut Dantine, Andrea King, 
William Prince and John Alvin. A 
mystery story laid in Northern Cali¬ 
fornia—a honeymoon resort on the 
Monterey Peninsula, a mountain hide¬ 
away, and a home in San Francisco. 
Told from the woman’s angle, it’s 
what happened to a girl who married 
a man named Dr. Eric Ryder—mar¬ 
ried him just five days after they 
met, knowing little or nothing about 
him. First, there are repeated at¬ 
tempts made on her husband’s life, 
all of which he attempts to pass off 
as “accidental.” Then it turns out 
that the doctor’s patients have a habit 
of dying—and that, thinks the wife, 
is not accidental! 



60 


A role for Helmut Dantine, without a uniform! 























PICTURES IN PRODUCTION 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 341 


acting talents. The girl is Martha 
Stewart, and the father is Henry Mor¬ 
gan. Should be a goodie. 

AT PARAMOUNT: 

THE IMPERFECT LADY is a brand 
new title for that much-touted pic¬ 
ture formerly labeled I TAKE THIS 
WOMAN. A Victorian romance, the 
picture deals with the fact that Ray 
Milland, as a gifted young politician, 
has fallen in love with Teresa Wright, 
a dancer. Teresa becomes involved 
in a murder case and is presented 
with the need to make a difficult 
decision: if she keeps still, she will 
allow an innocent man (Anthony 
Quinn) to pay for a crime; if she 
speaks up, she runs the risk of costing 
Milland his political career and losing 
his love. In addition to Teresa Wright, 
Ray Milland and Anthony Quinn, the 
cast boasts such diverse talents as 
Virginia Field, Reginald Owen, Sir 
Cedric Hardwicke, Joan Winfield, 
Melville Cooper and Miles Mander. 
(Incidental note: did you know that 
Ray Milland’s original name was Ed¬ 
die Underdown?) 

MONSIEUR. BEAUCAIRE is the 
new Bob Hope picture, which you will 
see even if it involves nothing more 
gripping than the determination of 
the next twiddlywinks championship 
—which, of course, MONSIEUR 
BEAUCAIRE does not. It does involve 
Mr. Hope’s attempt to pass himself 
off as the finest swordsman in all 


France in the midst of a covey of very 
hilt-happy characters. Only the time¬ 
ly entrance of the real Due de Chan- 
dre (played by Patric Knowles) saves 
Mr. Hope from the facade of a nut¬ 
meg grater. Playing a bit in the pic¬ 
ture is Charles Cooley who went to 
grammar school with Bob in Cleve¬ 
land, and who became Bob’s first pro¬ 
fessional partner at $25.00 per week 
for the team. Also rustling around the 
sound stage in silks, velvets and laces 
are Joan Caulfield, Cecil Kellaway, 
Reginald Owen, Constance Collier, 
Hillary Brooke, Joseph Schildkraut, 
Marjorie Reynolds, Mary Nash, and 
Fortunio Bononova. 

LOVE LIES BLEEDING is another 
example of the hardboiled school of 
dramas graced by “Double Indem¬ 
nity,” et als. Even at this writing the 
case is not complete. Plot deals with 
the machinations of an iron woman 
who, - through political maneuvers, 
rules a city. When she murders her 
aunt, the secret is shared by two per¬ 
sons, but the iron woman thinks two 
others may be aware of the deed. The 
slow grinding of the mill of justice 
develops the picture. Barbara Stan¬ 
wyck is the iron woman, for whom 
Edith Head has created an entire 
wardrobe of atmosphere clothing in- 
vQlving sombre dresses highlighted by 
brash, metallic touches. Van Heflin, 
Lizabeth Scott and Kirk Douglas 
round out a highly competent cast. 

EASY COME, EASY GO is the new 


title for the picture originally placed 
before the cameras as THIRD AVE¬ 
NUE. (You see how tough life can be 
for a reporter?) The plot, under any 
name, goes like this: Barry Fitzgerald, 
as a lovable and wholly irresponsible 
old rascal, lives on the comfortable as¬ 
sumption that he will one day beat 
the ponies. The boarding house on 
Third Avenue, run by Barry’s picture- 
daughter Diana Lynn, keeps the old 
hoss player from starving to death 
on parlays. When Seabee Sonny Tufts 
comes home, Barry turns his atten¬ 
tion to the project of breaking up 
Sonny’s romance with Diana. 

SWAMP -FIRE is a Pine-Thomas 
Production, which means that it is 
roduced fast and furiously on low 
udgdt, and is likely to be surpris¬ 
ingly good. For one thing, it provides 
Johnny Weissmuller with his first 
fully-dressed, real-talking role as a 
bar pilot in the Mississippi River. Laid 
in the Bayou country, it deals with 
the rivalries among the Cajuns, one 
of whom is another ex-swimming 
champ, Buster Crabbe. Also cast are 
Virginia Grey as the love interest, 
Pedro de Cordoba, Edwin Maxwell, 
Pierre Watkin and Frank Fenton. 

MANHATTAN AT MIDNIGHT is in 
its first week of production with Eddie 
Bracken, Virginia Welles, Cass Daley 
(brilliant entertainer), Virginia Field, 
and one of the best dancers in the 
world, Johnny Coy. Spike Jones and 
His Band have some mad moments, 
which brings up the news that Spike 
has finally gotten around to applying 
his Beat-Your-Brain-Out treatment 
to the symphonic “Holiday For 
Strings”. 

(Continued next page) 


AN ADVERTISEMENT OF PEPSI-COLA COMPANY 



“You pick them for their taste, don? tcha?” 


61 






























62 



his woman knows comfort. 
Security, too— 

Meds’ extra protection 
Will give both to you! 

Go anywhere, poised and happy, for 
Meds internal protection frees you 
from pins and belts, from revealing 
lines and ridges. And Meds' exclu¬ 
sive feature-the "SAFETY-WELL" 
£ives you the self-confidence of its 
extra-protection! 

• Meds alone have the "SAFETY- 
WELL"—designed for your extra 
protection. 

• Meds are made of real COTTON— 
soft and super-absorbent for extra 
comfort. 

• Meds expand quickly and adapt them¬ 
selves easily to individual needs. 




AT MONOGRAM: 

GLAMOUR GIRL, despite its bath¬ 
ing beauty title, is another of those 
hard-berled murder dramas in the 
tradition of “Murder, My Sweet.” 
Murder against the background of ice 
is going to strike the macabre-minded 
as fortuitous; but, with skater Belita 
under contract, Monogram had a nat¬ 
ural in that planning. In one skating 
scene, to point up the plot, Belita 
skates backward, turns a split second 
before reaching the obstacle, and 
leaps lightly through a ring made of 
in-pointed sabres. Also cast are Albert 
Dekker as the murdered man who re¬ 
fuses to die, Barry Fitzgerald as an 
admirer of the ice star, Bonita Gran¬ 
ville as a vixen, and Bobbie Ramos 
and his band as themselves. 

AT COLUMBIA: 

Last month, this department fell for 
a rib; a jocular representative of Co¬ 
lumbia described GILDA as “an at¬ 
tempt to revive the shimmy in rumba 
time.” However, perusal of the script 
indicates that GILDA has nothing to 
do with Gilda Gray. It is the story of 
a South American girl who gets in¬ 
volved with a local gangster, whose 
murder is attributed to Glenn Ford, 
who wouldn’t swat a fly unless it 
sniffed his chocolate cake in an offen¬ 
sive manner. Rita Hayworth is the 
luscious damsel who flees for her life, 
Glenn Ford gets the girl, and menace 
is supplied in various amounts by 
George Macready, Joseph Calleia, 
Ludwig Donath and Steve Geray. 

PERILOUS HOLIDAY is another 
story laid in the Latin area. Pat 
O’Brien is cast in an equivocal role 
that doesn’t allow him to reveal his 
true colors until the final scenes. 
Suspecting him of counterfeiting in¬ 
vasion money is Ruth Warrick, a girl 
reporter. Assisting in this comedy- 
thriller are Alan Hale, Audrey Long, 
Edgar Buchanan and Minna -Gombell. 

THE LONE WOLF ON BROAD¬ 
WAY is another in the Lone Wolf 
series with Gerald Mohr, Janis Carter, 
Eric Blore and Adele Roberts. 

THE AL JOLSON STORY is being 
produced by Hollywood’s Bill Genius, 
Sydney Skolsky. Being shot in Tech¬ 
nicolor, it gives his first real oppor¬ 
tunity to Larry Parks, who has been 
fighting it out on the Columbia line 
for two years. If you saw “Counter¬ 
attack”, you will remember Larry as 
the boy with the dog who traipsed 
through 8 reels of jungle, only to die 
and send his dog on (no pun in¬ 
tended). This was shot in such low 
key that Larry was almost invisible. 
Also cast in THE AL JOLSON STORY 
are William Demarest. Edgar Buchan¬ 
an, Ludwig Donath, Scotty Beckett & 
Tamara Shayne. (Evelyn Keyes has 
just been selected for the Ruby Keeler 
role.) 

EXPOSED BY THE CRIME DOC¬ 
TOR is another in that detective se¬ 
ries, keeping busy Warner Baxter, 
Mona Barrie, Craig Reynolds, Lud¬ 
wig Donath, Peggy Converse, and 
Robert Barratt.- 

LANDRUSH is a westrun hot pistol 
carried by Charles Starrett, Smiley 
Burnette, Ozie Waters and his Colo¬ 
rado Rangers. That’s what ah said, 
podner. 

AT MGM: 

HOLIDAY IN MEXICO, in Techni¬ 
color, tells the story of an Hungarian 
Countess (Illona Massey) who flees 
to Mexico City when war breaks out 
in Europe, and meets the American 
Ambassador south of the border (Wal¬ 


ter Pidgeon). Seems that these two 
have met before, so the old fire is re¬ 
kindled to the extent of Mr. Pidgeon’s 
actually singing an Hungarian duet 
with pulchritudinous Miss Massey. In 
ten years, this is Mr. Pidgeon’s first 
singing role. Also working in HOLI¬ 
DAY IN MEXICO are Jane Powell, 
Jose Iturbi, Xavier Cugat, Roddy Mc- 
Dowall and Helen Stanley. 

THE GREEN YEARS is the drama¬ 
tization of A. J. Cronin’s great book, 
with Charles Coburn, Tom Drake, 
Selena Royle, Hume Cronyn, and 
Jimmy Aubrey. 

NO LEAVE, NO LOVE is Van John¬ 
son’s new picture, dealing with the 
experiences of a veteran who- returns 
to find his girl friend, but whose ro¬ 
mances take a higher Crossley when 
he appears on a radio show. Also 
cast are Pat Kirkwood, the British 
beauty; Keenan Wynn, Marie Wilson 
and Edward Arnold. Incidentally, 
Van is on a diet; for the first time 
since his accident, he has accumulated 
enough weight for the- studio to sug¬ 
gest a daily calory count. 

TIME FOR TWO is taking up all 
the time of John Hodiak, Lucille Ball, 
Lloyd Nolan and Lenore Ulric. John 
had been trying to do some Christmas 
shopping in person, but he wound up 
on the set telephone every spare min¬ 
ute during the shooting schedule be¬ 
cause he appeared in practically every 
scene in the picture. 

THE YEARLING, in Technicolor, is 
the dramatization of Marjorie Kinnan 
Rawlings’ story about the Florida 
crackers. Gregory Peck is doing an 
academy award job with Jane Wy¬ 
man, Claude Jarman, Jr., Jeff York, 
Henry Travers, June Lockhart, Chill 
Wills and Clem Bevans. 

STAR FROM HEAVEN is one of the 
first pictures to be shot in Cinecolor, 
a process that is to watercolors as 
Technicolor compares to oil painting. 
The story concerns the attempt of a 
Texas G. I. to bring home (from the 
South Pacific) the colt he has found 
during a battle. Marshall Thompson, 
George Tobias, Jim Davis, Clem Bev¬ 
ans and the horse Silversnip consti¬ 
tute the cast. 

TILL THE CLOUDS ROLL BY, in 
Technicolor, will undoubtedly be one 
of the biggest musical pictures of the 
year. Dealing with the life of Jerome 
Kern, the role being enacted by Rob¬ 
ert Walker, it will feature the songs 
of Judy Garland (her last camera 
work before her blessed event), Frank 



Renee Asherson, British film star, plays 
the lead opposite L. Oliver in "Henry V." 












%he Stopped^ at Nothing 

Not Even 


TO HOLD THE MAN 
SHE LOVED 


Murder 


Gene Tierney 
in the 20tn 
Century - Fox 
Production 
"Leave Her 
to Heaven." 


'^TEiVER was there a woman whose appearance 
so belied her true self! Ellen Berent’s beauty, 
stunning in its perfection, made easy conquests-of 
men. But she was so insanely jealous that she 
could not bear to share any part of a man’s love 
with anyone else—or with anything! And so # her 
lovely face became a mask for a diabolical heart. 
She plotted against anyone whose mere existence 
challenged her mania for being loved completely. 
She lied, cheated, deceived. It didn’t matter who 
seemed to stand in her way—an innocent boy . . . 
her own sister . . . her unborn child ... all became 
objects of her suspicious hate. When all else failed, 
there was—murder! 

You’ve probably never read a book like this. It 
is a story of such power and fascination that “it 
will hold you from start to finish with your spine 
crawling like an inch worm and invisible hands 
massaging your scalp”—as the Boston Post said. 

“Leave Her to Heaven” is a nation-wide best¬ 
seller which will soon be seen by millions as a 
moving picture. Will you accept a copy of this 
360-page book now, practically as a gift, with mem¬ 
bership in the Dollar Book Club? 


Over 1.000.000 
People Have 
Bought This Book! 

“Will hypnotize 
you until you 
have turned the 
last page!”— 
New York Times. 

“A wholly credi¬ 
ble story of an 
amoral woman.” 
—Chicago Sun. 


Dollar Book Club Membership Is FREE! 


~THE DOLLAR BOOK CLUB is the only 
A book Club that brings you newly printed, 
current books by outstanding authors for only 
SI.00 each. This represents a saving to you of 
50 to 75 per cent from the established retail 
price. Every Dollar Book Club selection is a 
handsome, full-sized library edition, well-printed 
and bound in a format exclusively for members. 

Although one outstanding book is chosen each 
month for exclusive distribution to members at 
$1.00 each you do not have to accept a book 
every month; only the purchase of six a year 
is necessary. In fact for convenience, most 
members prefer to have shipped and pay for 
books every other month. 

The Economical, Systematic Way to 
Build a Library of Good Books 

Dollar Book Club selections are fr#m the best 
modern books—selected from the important new 
titles submitted by leading publishers. Such 
outstanding best sellers as A Tree Grows in 
Brooklyn , The Razor’s Edge and A Lion Is in 
the Streets were all received by members at 
$1.00 each, while the public was paying from 
$2.00 to $3.00 for the publisher’s edition at 
retail. A membership of over 500,000 enables 
the Club to offer book values unequaled by any 
other method of book buying. 


Choose Your First Selection From These Best Seilers 

Upon receipt of the attached coupon with a 3c 
stamp you will be sent a copy of “Leave Her to 
Heaven.” You will also receive as your first se¬ 
lection for $1.00 your choice of any of these 

th rpp Kp^t ^pllpr^' 

• Green Dolphin Street, by Elizabeth Goudge. He 
sent half way around the world—for the wrong 
bride! This best-selling romance of Clipper ship 
days won the MGM $125,000 Novel Prize Contest! 

• China to Me, by Emily Hahn. The best-selling 

true story of eight years in China—the most 
astonishing adventures ever to befall an Ameri¬ 
can woman. . 

• The Strange Woman, by Ben Ames Williams. 
The unforgettable story of “A Maine Cleopatra” 
by the author of “Leave Her to Heaven.’ 

Every other month you will receive the de¬ 
scriptive folder called The Bulletin, which is 
sent exclusively to members of the Club. The 
Bulletin describes the forthcoming two months’ 
book selections and reviews ten or more titles 
(in the original publishers’ editions selling at 
retail for $2.50 or more) available to members at 
only $1.00 each. If you do not wish to purchase 
either or both of the two new selections for $1.00 
each, you may notify the Club any time within 
two weeks, so that the books will not be sent you. 
In any case, you may purchase any of the other 
titles offered for $1.00 each. There are no dues 
or membership fees. 

Send No Money—Just Mail the Coupon 

When you see “Leave Her to Heaven” and your 
first selection and consider that these books are 
typical of the values you will receive for only 
$1.00, you will realize the great advantage of free 
membership in this popular Club. Don’t miss 
this wonderful offer. Mail the coupon now. 
DOUBLEDAY ONE DOLLAR BOOK CLUB 
Garden City, New York 


■ 

I 

I 

I 

■ 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

■ 

I 

H 

I 

I 

I 

I 


MAIL THIS 
COUPON 

Doubleday One Dollar Book Club, 

Dept. 2HWG, Garden City, New York 

Please enroll me free as a Dollar Book Club 
subscriber and send me at once “Leave Her to 
Heaven’' for the enclosed 3c stamp. Also send 
me as my flrst seleotion for $1.00 the book I 
have checked below. 

□ Green Dolphin Street □ China to Me 
□ The Strange Woman 
With these books will come my first Issue of 
x the free descriptive folder called “The Bulle¬ 
tin” telling about the two new forthcoming 
one-dollar bargain book selections and several 
additional bargains- which are offered for $1.00* 
each to members only. I am to have the privi-* 
lege of notifying you in advance if I do not 
wish either of the following month's selec¬ 
tions and whether or not I wish to purchase 
any of the other bargains at the Special Club 
price of $1.00 each. The purchase of books is 
entirely voluntary on my part. I do not have 
to accept a book every month—only six dur¬ 
ing the year to fulfill my membership re¬ 
quirement. I pay nothing except $1.00. for each 
selection received plus few cents shipping cost. 

Mr.’ 

Mrs. 

Miss . 


(PLEASE PRINT) 


St. and No. 


City 


Zone No. 
(if any) 


State 


• If under 21 

Occupation ... Age please - 

• Same Price in Canada: 105 Bond St. Toronto 2. 


63 













64 



PRINT 

NAME 


ADDRESS_ 


AIR-LINE Shxtionsitef 

340 W. 39th ST., NEW YORK 18, N Y. 


/ 7y _ ii VJatiUd! EARN MONEY IN SPARE TIME 



Free Booklet. Marvel Co., 70 East St., New Haven, Ct. 



Sinatra, Lena Horne, Gloria De 
Haven, Lucille Bremer, and Jacque¬ 
line White. 

AT RKO: 

BADMAN’S TERRITORY is RKO’s 
frontier fete with Randolph Scott, Ann 
Richards, Lawrence Tierney (you saw 
him in “Dillinger”), Isabel Jewell, 
Gabby Hayes, Morgan Conway (look 
—Dick Tracy!), *and James Warren. 
Run for your life, stranger, the James 
Boys and Daltons are coming! 

THE STRANGER is being directed 
by Orson Welles,, and is distinguished 
by a cast consisting of Edward G. 
Robinson, Loretta Young, Mr. Welles, 
Richard Long, Philip Merivale, Martha 
Wentworth and Charles Wright, Jr. 
In the picture, Loretta Young will 
wear a duplicate of the gown she wore 
when she married Tom Lewis. 

LADY LUCK is the storv about cer¬ 
tain assorted members of the gam¬ 
bling fraternity; being used in the pic¬ 
ture are two pairs of “educated” dice, 
one pair of which consistently turns 
up naturals, and the other pair pro¬ 
vides losing combinations. After the 
dice are used each day, they are 
locked up in the prop department. 
Robert Young, Barbara Hale, Frank 
Morgan and James Gleason are the 
actors who always turn up as “nat¬ 
urals.” 

THE DREAM OF HOME is the story 
of the ci,viljan adjustments made by 
a grqup of Marines when they return 
to the States, and the reawakening 
of a war widow. If you read Niven 
Busch’s book, you know the plot. 
Dorothy McGuire is the young widow, 
and the ex-marines are Guy Madison, 
Bob Mitchum, Bill Williams and Bill 
Gargan; also in the cast are Jean 
Porter and Harry Von Zell. 

We will give you greater detail on 
THANKS, GOD, I’LL TAKE IT FROM 
HERE as soon as that title is changed, 
which it will be shortly. Because of 
the cast, you’ll see the picture: Clau¬ 
dette Colbert, John Wayne, Don De- 
Fore, Ann Triola (you may not rec¬ 
ognize this name, but Anne is very 
well known in Los Angeles. She sang 
for a long time at The Bar of Music, 
and h^s made several overseas tours, 
singing for the armed forces), Ruth 
Roman and Henry Johnson. 

NOTORIOUS is another in the cur¬ 
rent South American scene movie 
cycle. In this one Igrid Bergman is 
suspected of being a German agent, 
and is kept under surveillance of an 
American counter-espionage agent, 
Cary Grant. Claude Rains and Louis 
Calhern are also cast. 

SISTER KENNY is the long-awaited 
story of the life experiences of the 
valiant Australian nurse who has 
found a new treatment for infantile 
paralysis. Rosalind Russell is playing 
“Sister Kenny,” supported by Alex¬ 
ander Knox, and Dean Jagger, hap¬ 
pily back with us from Broadway. 

AT REPUBLIC: 

MURDER IN THE MUSIC HALL’S 
plot is suggested by its title. The 
cast includes Vera Hruba Ralston, 
William Marshall, Helen Walker, 
Nancy Kelly, William Gargan, Ann 
Rutherford, Julie Bishop, Jack LaRue, 
Edward Norris, Joe Yule, and Jerome 
Cowan. 

AT UNITED ARTISTS: 

THE SIN OF HAROLD DIDDLE- 
BOCK is the Preston Sturgis nifty in 
which Harold Lloyd returns to pic¬ 
tures. Frances Ramsden (a newie, 
very luscious), Raymond Walburn, 


Rudy Vallee, Edgar Kennedy, Jimmy 
Conlin, Arline Judge, Lionel Standee, 
and Franklin Pangborn are contribut¬ 
ing to the laughs. 

A SCANDAL IN PARIS is the first 
picture to feel the frown of the John¬ 
son (nee Hayes) office. A torrid kiss 
between George Sanders and Carole 
Landis was cut. The scenes of Signe 
Hasso, Akim Tamiroff, Gene Lockhart, 
Alan Napier, Alma Kruger, Pedro de 
Cordoba, Jo Ann Marlowe, and Fritz 
Leiber have been unscissored. 

ADVENTURES IN CASABLANCA 
is the title of the Harpo, Chico & 
Groucho Marx picture which is also 
disturbing the equilibrium of Charles 
Drake, Lisette Verea, Lois Collier, Sig 
Ruman, Dan Seymour, and Lewis 
Russell. 

AT UNIVERSAL: 

CANYON PASSAGE is the Walter 
Wanger Production being shot .in 
Technicolor. Most of the picture wafc 
actually filmed in Oregon at Diamond 
Lake. Dealing with a cabin raising, 
and Indian uprising, and the general 
woes of the pioneer, it should be one 
of the best pictures of the year. Dana 
Andrews, Brian Donlevy, Susan Hay¬ 
ward, the new English actress Pa¬ 
tricia Roc, Andy Devine, Hoagy Car¬ 
michael, Rose Hobart, Ray Collins, 
Ward Bond, Fay Holden, Dorothy 
Peterson, Harry Shannon and Halli- 
well Hobbs make up the cast. 

TANGIER is the first picture to al¬ 
low Maria Montez a wardrobe other 
than colored veils. In one scene she 
wears a sleek black evening gown, 
topped by a multi-feathered hat, and 
in another she wears a black lace 
dancing costume splattered with se¬ 
quins. In the picture, Maria portrays 
a young Spanish woman searching 
for the man responsible for the death 
of her parents during the Spanish 
revolution. The hunt leads to Tan- 
giers, the North African port, where 
she finds him. Robert Paige, Sabu, 
Preston Fqster, Louise Allbritton, 
Kent Taylor, J. Edward Bromberg, 
Billy Green, and Reginald Denny are 
Maria’s able Thespian assistants. 

GENIUS IN THE FAMILY is a 
comedy, just started, involving Myrna 
Loy, Don Ameche, Richard Gaines, 
Bobby Driscoll, Sarah Padden (a fugi¬ 
tive from The Hardys), Clara Blan- 
dick, Molly Lamont and John Gal- 
lau'det. The producers of “Guest 
Wife”, Jack Skirball and Bruce Man¬ 
ning, arq also producing this happy 
farce. 

ON THE CARPET is the new Ab¬ 
bott & Costello picture with Jacque¬ 
line deWit, Elena Verdugo, Mary 
Gordon and George Cleveland. 

AT WARNER S: 

THE VERDICT is one of those 
British-laid low-key-lighting pictures 
of intrigue amid the fog. Sydney 
Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, and Joan 
Lorring (three of the vivid characters 
in “Three Strangers”) carry the heavy 
chill to audience spines, aided by 
George Coulouris, Paul Cavanaugh, 
and Rosalind Ivan. 

The End 


NEXT MONTH! 

Unmasking Jean Pierre Aumont! The 
personality traits of the famous French 
actor are revealed by Helen King’s 
handwriting analysis. Read all about it 
in the March issue of MOVIELAND. 























DON'T BE AFRAID AND STOP WORRYING NOW ABORT EXTERNAL 
SKIN TROUBLES. FOLLOW THESE EASY DIRECTIONS. 

By Betty MesrifduA. 


ADVICE FOR 

ABUSED SKIN 


Have you ever stopped to realize that the leading screen stars that you 
admire, as well as the beautiful models who have lovely, soft white skin, were 
all born just like you with a lovely smooth skin? 

Almost everyone can have a natural, normal complexion which is in itself 
beauty. All you must do is follow a few simple rules. Models and screen 
stars must give their skin special attention. So should you, because everydne 
looks at your face. Your social success may depend upon your being good 
looking, because a lovely skin may be a short cut to success in love and busi¬ 
ness. Your pleasure is worth it; and you owe it to yourself to give your 
complexion a chance to be more beautiful. 

Medical science gives us the truth about a lovely skin. There are small 
specks of dust in the air all the time. 


When these little specks, which are 
in the air get into an open pore in 
your skin, they can in time cause the 
pore to become larger and more sus¬ 
ceptible to dust and infection. These 
open pores begin to form blackheads 
which become infected and bring you 
the misery of pimples, irritations or 
blemishes. When you neglect your 
skin by not giving it the necessary 
care it requires, you leave yourself 
wide open for externally caused skin 
miseries. When you know that your 
skin is smooth, white and fine, you 
have more confidence and it helps 
improve your personality, and it 
helps improve your entire well being. 
Your skin is priceless, yet it costs 
you only a few pennies daily to 
keep it normal, natural and love¬ 
ly. Many women never realize or 
even suspect that the difference be¬ 
tween a glamorous complexion and 
an ordinary one may be caused by 
having blackheads and pimples. 

The proper attention with the 


double Viderm treatment may mean 
the difference between enjoying the 
confidence a fine skin gives you or 
the embarrassment of an ugly abused 
skin. The double Viderm treatment 
is a formula prescribed by a doctor, 

• B/ : and costs you only a few cents 

';BF ^^^B h daily. This treatment consists of two 

^B jars. One jar contains Viderm Skin 
■'! W H Cleanser, a jelly-like formula which 

r/B .//, ^BHi' 7B penetrates and acts as an antiseptic 

^B upon your pores. After you use this 
BlBH| special Viderm Skin Cleanser, apply 

the Viderm Fortified Medicated Skin 
Cream. You rub this in, leaving an 
pr almost invisible protective covering 

^ for the surface of your skin. 

, This double treatment has worked 

j. . f ^^^B wonders for so many cases of abused 

Sk*-tskin, it may help you, too, or your 
W money will be refunded. Use it for 

f v ten days. You have everything to 

gam and nothing to lose. It is a 
Jp ^^B guaranteed treatment. Enjoy it. 

Use your double Viderm treatment 
every day until your skin is smoother 
^^B and clearer. Then, use it only once 
mm a week to remove stale make-up 
and dust specks that infect your 
pores and to aid in healing external irritations. When you help prevent 
blackheads, you help prevent externally caused skin miseries and pimples. 
While your two jars and the doctor’s directions are on the way to you, be 
sure to give your face enough attention and wash it as often as is necessary. 
Wash with warm water and then cleanse with water as cold as you can stand, 
in order to freshen, stimulate and help close your pores. After you receive 
everything, read your directions carefully, and then go right to it with these 
two fine formulas. 

Just mail your name and address to Betty Memphis, care of The New York 
Skin Laboratory, 206 Division Street, Dept. 232, New York City 2, New York. 
By return mail you will receive both of the Viderm formulas, with full direc¬ 
tions for using Viderm Skin Cleanser and Viderm Fortified Medicated Skin 
Cream. The doctor’s directions and both jars are packed in a sealed carton, 
safety sealed. On delivery, pay two dollars plus postage. If you wish, you can 
save the postage fee by mailing your two dollars with your letter. If you are 
in any way dissatisfied, your money will be cheerfully refunded. Both of the 
formulas you use have been fully tested and proven, and are reliable for you. 
If they don’t help you your treatments cost nothing. After you have received 
your Viderm, if you have any questions to ask concerning abused skin, just 
send them in.—ADV. 


65 


66 


SHOP BY MAIL IN HOLLYWOOD! 


A FILMLAND 
SENSATION! 



JUMPER 

DRESS 



y 




I EAVENLY two-tone jumper with slim 
young lines! Bright metal nailhead "studs" trim 
the fitted waistband and pocket flaps. It's color¬ 
ful. flattering, wearable! Crisp rayon. Sixes 10 
to 18. 


HELEN 

TALBOT 


featured in 
Republic's 

"King of 
the Forest 
Rangers" 


Green and Brown 
Red and Navy 


Powder and Navy 
Gold and Brown 

$7.98 plus postage 
"BOW-TIE BLOUSE ' — Drawstring neck , . . 
full sleeves. Smooth, WHITE, expensive-looking 
rayon. Sizes 32 to 38. $3.98 plus postage. 

RITA HAVES OF HOLLYWOOD 

Dept 108, M04 Hollywood Blvd.. Hollywood 28, Co lit. 

[send NO MQN^ WP*^j^o[oj| 

J RITA HAYES OF HOLLYWOOD, D.pt. ios. J 

J *404 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Collf. J 

■ Please send me “Sporlile Studs" Jumper et i 

I $7.98 plus postage. ■ 

1 Powder and Navy 0 Green and Brown 0 J 

Gold and Brown 0 Red and Navy 0 ■ 

| Mart 1st S 2nd Color Choic. | * 

j Sizes: 10 12 14 1« 18 ICird. «. ...i.d | J 

■ Please send me "Bow-Tie Blouse" at $3.98 ’’ * l "' • 

( Whitn only ) P-t. S . , 

1 Sizes: 32 34 34 38 I CircU l if wantad ) | 

I 

I NAME ___ I 

I I 


| AUUK 

I 

I cirr_ 




LAUGHTER IS A SERIOUS BUSINESS 

f CONTINUED FROM PAGE SO) 


to such sure-fire laugh provokers as 
Abbott and Costello, Olsen and John¬ 
son, Laurel and Hardy, Jack Benny, 
Bob Hope, Charlie Chaplin, Joan 
Pavis and numerous other comedians. 

Ever since they first set foot inside 
Hollywood, . some four years ago, 
people have been asking: “Why do 
we laugh at Abbott and Costello?” 
Even today, it’s one of the chief topics 
of discussion over Hollywood lunch¬ 
eon tables: how do you account for 
the sensational screen success of the 
two former burlesque clowns? 

They’ve been asking the same ques¬ 
tions for years, about other “funny 
men.” Fact is, it’s a stock question: 
what makes comedians funny? And 
if you want a serious and considered 
answer, here it is: 

Costello, like Chaplin, is really the 
sad clown, the “underdog.” His face 
expresses the perfect mixture of 
comedy and pathos; he is the living 
caricature of the type of human being 
! who’s perpetually and inevitably im- 
j pcised upon; he’s always being “the 
| victim.” Beneath the surface of your 
! own feelings, every time you see Cos¬ 
tello being kicked in the pants, your 
instinctive (though not expressed) re¬ 
action is to want to cry. 

You don’t cry, because actually 
you’re ashamed to; but you do feel 
sorry when you see the little roly poly 
man slip on a banana peel or as in 
“Here Come the Co-Eds,” when he 
gets himself all tangled up in a pan 
of dough. You hide your feelings, 
and substitute the emotion nearest to 
pity—which happens to be laughter. 
And that’s why most comedians have 
to be the sort of people you can easily 
pity. 

Here’s another angle, too. Looking 
at most comedians in a serious light, 
they represent “the little man”—you, 
me and the other fellow—struggling 
against a world of long odds and bad 
breaks, and getting nowhere. 

In every one of their routines which 
have continued during the fifteen 
years of their record-breaking asso¬ 
ciation, Bud Abbott has represented 
“reality.” Costello, on the other 



Fred Allen, famed movie and radio comic. 


hand, is the “dreamer.” Whenever he 
brushes up against the harshness of 
life, he gets hurt. 

But the real secret behind this 
team’s success is that Costello is al¬ 
ways frustrated. And nothing is 
sadder—nor at the same time funnier 
—than to see someone else being 
frustrated. 

Laurel and Hardy are another suc¬ 
cessful comedy team who represent 
the absurdities of life. Here again, 
you find Stan Laurel as one of the 
saddest human beings imaginable. 
The very fact that he is continually on 
the verge of tears is one of the reasons 
why he’s so funny. Hardy, by con¬ 
trast, represents the cruel reality of 
life. When Laurel’s dream-world 
comes in contact with Hardy’s realism, 
the result is—laughter, of course. 

With Charlie Chaplin humor as¬ 
sumes an altogether different twist. 
Sometimes it goes beyond its original 
point and really makes us sad. Some¬ 
times, as in the never-to-be-forgotten 
scene in “Modern Times”—where the 
speeding up of the machine makes an 
automaton of Charlie—we see our¬ 
selves in his role, and it’s too sad for 
laughter. This is reality stretched to 
the breaking point. This is an at¬ 
tempt to make fun of things that 
happen to us every day. And when 
reality is intended to be humorous, 
it becomes satire. And satire, your 
dictionary will tell you, is humor of 
a bitter brand. 

Chaplin has several special trade 
secrets. First and foremost, of course, 
is his costume. He is the clown who is 
trying to be an elegant man-of-the- 
world in his appearance. But he falls 
short—and instead, becomes ridicu¬ 
lous. Chaplin studied his clothes care¬ 
fully before he adopted them. Now 
he knows that the mere sight of him 
dressed in his baggy pants and derby 
hat, provokes laughter. His shfile is 
another identifying feature. He smiles 
not as though he means it, but like a 
man who is hurt. 

If you analyze Chaplin’.s particular 
brand of comedy, you will find that 
it results from a man who is always 
hurt by situations in life. He is the 



Bob Burns, Cass Daley on NBC "Cavalcade." 








































■ 




DARLING, THIS 
STERLING CHECH 
CERTAINLY HELPS! 




Every 2 Vi seconds someone enters a hospital! YOU—or some¬ 
one in your family—may be next! Good hospital insurance is im¬ 
portant. Provide cash to help pay the many bills that pile up when 
accident, sickness, or a needed operation sends you or a member 
of your family to the hospital. At special low family rates this new 
Sterling Family Hospital and Surgical Policy provides cash bene¬ 
fits to help pay your expenses for hospital room and board, operat¬ 
ing room. X-ray, anesthetic, medicines, and other stated hospital 
expenses—and also for doctor’s fee for operations. One policy 
covers each and every member of your family. 


FOR YOU and Your Family 

HOSPITAL EXPENSES"mar'd 1 

Pays expenses for Room and 
Board, up to $4.00 a day for as 
many as 90 doys in any policy 
year—no matter how many 
times you are in the hospital! 

PLUS. . . a total of $50.00 for ad¬ 
ditional hospital expenses Incurred 
up to . . . $10.00 for operating 
room, $5.00 for laboratory fees, 
$5.00 for medicines, $10.00 for an¬ 
esthetics. $10.00 for physiotherapy, 
$5.00 for X-rays, $5.00 for ambu¬ 
lance service. These benefits pay¬ 
able for EACH hospitalization. 


SPECIAL FAMILY RATES —Take the 

You are not limited to just one hospitaliza¬ 
tion—this policy pays benefits no matter 
how many times you or any insured member 
of your family has to go to the hospital, up 
to 90 days in any policy year for EACH 
person, as provided. The money is paid direct 
to you, and you may use any doctor and any 
hospital anywhere. You may insure as many 
in the family as you wish—anyone now in 
good health, from 3 months old to 65 years. 


Expense Out of Hospital Care 

Insure With Confidence 

This low-cost Family Hospital and Surgical 
Policy is issued by the nationally known 
Sterling Insurance Company, a legal reserve in¬ 
surance company with over $2,000,000.00 sur¬ 
plus for policyholders. There are more than 
500,000 Sterling-protected men, women and 
children throughout America. Over $3,000,- 
000.00 cash benefits already paid on Sterling 
policies, and more being paid every day. 


PLUS OPERATION EXPENSES 

. . . Provides benefits from $5.00 to 
$100.00 for surgical operations, 
whether performed in hospital, at 
home, or in doctor’s office. 

CHILDBIRTH BENEFIT . . . 

Pays $4.00 a day for the usual 10- 
day period of maternity confine¬ 
ment. (After policy is in force 1 
year.) 

Policy covers accidents immediately 
. . . sickness alter policy in force 
30 days . . . lust a lew specified 
sicknesses require that policy be in 
force lor 6 months. 


IN ONE POLICY ... PROTECT 


FATHER—MOTHER 
CHILDREN 


S 



10 DAY TRIAL OFFER —Mail Coupon Today 

Rush coupon below now for Policy on 10-Day Trial 
Offer which gives you opportunity to have actual 
policy in force protecting you and your family with 
full benefits while you make up your mind. There’s 
no obligation of any kind . . . mail this coupon today. 
No agent will call on you! 


Sterling Insurance Company 
N-4148 Sterling Bldg., Chicago 11, III. 

Send me, without obligation, your 10-Day Trial 
Offer of Low-Cost Family Hospital and Surgical 
Plan. No agent will calf. 


TERLING INSURANCE V^O. 

N-4148 Sterling Bldg., CHICAGO 11. III. 


NAME. 

ADDRESS. 

CITY.STATE.. 


67 





























• "Dark-Eyes ", Dept. AB-6 
218 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 4, Illinois 

I enclose $1.20 (tax included) for regular size 
package of "Dark-Eyes", and directions. 

Check shades: □ Black □ Brown 

Name . 

Address . 

j Town . State . ■... J 


EYELASH DARKENER 

To keep lashes and brows bewitchingly dark 
and alluring . . . even after swimming, crying 
or perspiring, use “Dark-Eyes”. This indelible 
darkener never runs, smarts or smudges. One 
application lasts 4 to 5 weeks ... thus ending 
daily eye make-up bother. Caution: Use only 
as directed on the label. Try it! Get a package 
of “Dark-Eyes” today! 

$1.00 (plus tax) at leading drug and depart¬ 
ment stores. If your favorite dealer does not 
yet carry "Dark-Eyes”, mail coupon today! 



hictafCaa 
Breathe Aqamt 

Wonderfully quick, a little Va-tro-nol 
* in each nostril opens the nasal passages 
—makes breathing easier—when your 
nose fills up with stuffy transient con¬ 
gestion of a head cold. Brings new 
breathing comfort at night—invites 
restful sleep. Works fine for relieving 
sniffly, sneezy distress of head colds. 

Try it! You’ll like 
it! Follow direc¬ 
tions in package. 



VA-TR0-M0L 


goat of unfortunate occurrences; but 
because he himself is such a ridiculous 
figure, we cannot help laughing at 
him. 

Olsen and Johnson get their laughs 
in a somewhat different manner. 
Some of the more discriminating 
critics don’t even look at them as 
being comic artists! But that’s simply 
because their technique—unlike that 
of Abbott and Costello, Chaplin, or 
Laurel and Hardy—is very new. In¬ 
stead of continually being the butt of 
laughter themselves, they often turn 
the tables and get their laughs at the 
expense of a third stooge, or even of 
the audience itself. 

Their theory is that for thirty 
years they’ve been doing nothing suc¬ 
cessfully, and been well-paid for it. 
“What if we are nuts?” they say. 
“We’re having fun, too. In Holly¬ 
wood people kept saying, ‘But your 
comedy isn’t believable. Couldn’t 
you make it more real?’ So we asked, 
‘Is Mickey Mouse believable? Is 
Charlie McCarthy believable? In 
fact, are the Brooklyn Dodgers be- 
lievable?’ ” 

One gag, which later became an al¬ 
most traditional part of their act, 
started years ago, when they were 
touring in vaudeville one entire sea¬ 
son with another comedian on the 
same bill. The other comedian had a 
tendency to take himself seriously. 
So Olsen and Johnson decided to get 
his goat. While he was on the stage, 
they came through the audience and 
tried to break up his act. It was 
done in the spirit of good, clean fun 
—and got a hundred per cent laugh 
reaction from the audience. Everyone 
thought it was a great gag—everyone 
except the comedian himself. 

He decided to get even. Next day, 
he sat out front during the Olsen- 
Johnson act, and every few minutes 
interrupted with: “Which one of you 
mugs is Johnson?” The audience went 
into gales of laughter. Every time the 
question was repeated, the people in 
the theatre laughed louder. The idea 
was such a hit that upon this founda¬ 
tion, Olsen and Johnson have built up 


a completely new idea about comedy 
routines. 

They discovered that the audience 
wanted to participate. And on this 
theory, their show, “Hellzapoppin”, 
cleaned up some five million dollars. 
And “Laffing Room Only” and “Sons 
of Fun” followed in the same foot¬ 
steps. 

In the case of Edgar Bergen and 
Charlie McCarthy, the psychologist 
can immediately put his finger on the 
reason for the laughter they stir up. 
Part of every one of us is Charlie Mc¬ 
Carthy. We can rarely think of just 
the right wise-crack at the right mo¬ 
ment. After the opportune time to 
deliver it is past, then we always 
think of some fitting answer. Well, 
Charlie is the satisfaction for all of 
us. He thinks of the right thing at 
the right time. And being satisfied, 
we give him our approval—by laugh¬ 
ing. 

With Jack Benny, humor becomes a 
case of belittling himself. He will 
emphasize his own shortcomings—his 
receding hair, his stinginess, his 
fiddle-playing. He makes the audi¬ 
ence laugh merely by showing up his 
own weaknesses. By so doing, he as¬ 
sumes an inferior standing. And ac¬ 
cording to psychologists, when people 
are inferior to you, oddly enough you 
can laugh at them. When a man falls, 
you laugh. Why? Because—at that 
particular moment, at least—he is on 
a lower level than you, psychologically 
as well as literally. 

These are theories of laughter dat¬ 
ing all the way back to the early 
Greeks. The Greeks said “laughter 
is good for the soul.” And believe it 
or not, the same formulae are still 
working today. 

That’s not discounting the fact, 
however, that behind every gag, 
corny or good, is the sweat, tears and 
nervous ulcers of high-powered gag 
writers, plus the skill and talent of 
top comedians. To make people laugh? 
It’s the hardest thing in the world. 
But for those who can, it’s good 
business! 

The End 



Mischa Auer, of (he Russian Accent an> 




















THIS IS MYSELF 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 331 


taught me what to do, others have 
taught me what not to do. 

All those who have had faith in 
me. 

George Cukor, not only for direct¬ 
ing me in “The Women,” but because, 
although he had already selected an¬ 
other actress for the part and wanted 
her, when he had me wished off on 
him, he did everything in his very 
considerable power to help me. 

My son: For the sweetness, tender¬ 
ness, sense of protectiveness and 
added richness he has brought into 
my life and Freddy’s. 

A nun at school who had the amaz¬ 
ing capacity for making me work. 
The energy credited to me now is 
energy she engendered, deftly but 
with unflagging determination. 

Professor Kelly, at the Marymount 
School in Tarrytown, for making me 
study Theology. 

My profession. 

I LIKE: 

Movie magazines; Camembert 
cheese; a baby boy named Lance; 
mountains, lakes and high cliffs; 
thunder storms; Nature making a 
ruckus; New England in the Fall; to 
hear people laugh; to ride a horse, 
especially one I’m not sure I can 
manage; to be in on everything; anni¬ 
versaries. We have anniversaries for 
every occasion, Freddy and I—anni¬ 
versaries of the day we first met, the 
night we first danced together, the 
first time we did this, that, the other. 
Freddie, a Lt. Colonel, is still in ser¬ 
vice and is stationed in Washington. 
Our fourth wedding anniversary was 
in October, and was necessarily spent 
apart; but Freddie sent me half an 
anniversary cake and I sent him half 
a cake. I love occasions and celebrate 
anything and everything. 

I CAN’T BEAR: 

Cheapness in any form; patronizing 
people; phonies; galoshes, umbrellas 
and overshoes; gaudy jewelry; delib¬ 
erate neglect of anything, especially 
the needs of children, vulgar talk; 
sarcasm, since sarcastic people are 
usually pretty bright people and 
should know better. 

Coats of arms. All my life I’ve 
maintained that all my relatives were 
either horse thieves or had died in 
jail. It used to kill mother when 
she’d be talking about a certain rela¬ 
tive and I’d pipe up with “Oh, that’s 
the one who died in jail.” I very 
much dislike people who are always 
talking about their family back¬ 
ground. 

I MARVEL AT: 

The truly unspoiled quality of the 
so-called ‘spoiled’ American people; 
the fundamental goodness of people; 
the capacity of the individual to 
suffer physical pain, grief, bereave¬ 
ment, indignities, deprivations—and 
come through; the patience of parents; 
the patience of the aged with the 
antics of youth; the ability of Joe 
Louis to keep his arms up. 

I’M ANNOYED WITH: 

Papers in the streets, trash in the 
streets, untidiness in any form; waste 
of good food; parents who permit 
their children to put sticky hands on 
walls and jump up and down on good 

















HOLLYWOOD INSPIRED 



A darling 3-piece ensemble of Bolero, 
Slacks and Skirt ... a versatile ward¬ 
robe stretcher . . . vivacious and figure 
flattering. Swaggering Soutache Braid 
in a contrasting color adds a spicy touch 
of . distinction to the bolero and high 
waistband of the slacks and skirt. Pre¬ 
cisely tailored of crease-resistant rayon- 
reinforced gabardine in Navy, Brown, 
Green, Powder Blue and Cerise. Sizes 
10 to 20. Bolero $3.95, Slacks $6.95, 
Skirt $5.95 plus postage. 

BOW BLOUSE —bow tie and high neck 
line ... long, full sleeves . . . Rayon cloth 
in White $3.98 —Maize, Green and Light 
Blue, $4.98 plus mailing costs. 


SEND NO MONEY 


Mail coupon and 
pay postman on ar- 
A ... ... rival. Yes! 10 days’ 

examination privilege. Money refunded if not delighted. 
Send to Hollywood for guaranteed satisfaction. 


JjANNE OF HOLLYWOOD 

I Dept. 109-E, 5071 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 


I Please send "Matador” □ Bolero Q Skirt □ Sla 
I 3 □ Gr een □ Powder B 

Z □ Cerise (Mark 1st or 2nd choice) 

■ Size 10. 12. 14. 16. 18. 20 (circle size) 

■ Send Bow Blouse— 

■ □ White □ Maize □ Green □ Light B 
I Size 32. 34. 36, 38 (circle size) . 


■ Name... I 

J Address. ■ 

I City. State .J 


furniture; whiners; little slivers of 
soap left in soap dishes; compacts that 
spill powder; lipsticks that ooze; high, 
rasping voices; malicious gossip; my¬ 
self, when tired. 

I’M MAD ABOUT: 

Clothes, wacky hats; veils; scarves; 
copper and old brass; the color green; 
picture albums; tintypes and daguer¬ 
reotypes the old songs; the motion 
picture industry; babies’ feet; talent 
in any field, whether painting, plumb¬ 
ing, music, home-making, art, me¬ 
chanics, farming or whatever. It’s the 
flower of the human plant. The view 
of the San Francisco Bay from the 
roof of the Mark; tea in the after¬ 
noon. 

I LIKE TO READ: 

Joseph Conrad; Lance’s baby book; 
biographies, especially those of 
women. 

My husband’s gift cards. The cards 
he sends with flowers, especially on 
Monday mornings. He always sends 
red roses on Monday mornings. Don’t 
ask me why Monday, unless it’s the 
beginning of a new week and they are 
intended to act as an incentive. One 
Monday morning, however, the card 
read simply, “Captain Brisson,” which 
so outraged my sentimentality that I 
gave the box to the prop man on the 
set of “What a Woman”—and I let 
what I had done be known at home. 
Next day, more red hoses, this time 
with a love letter. 

I WISH I COULD: 

Speak dozens of languages; find 
more time for everything; invent 
some way to stretch time. 

I’M GUILTY OF: 

Procrastination; using a typewriter 
when I should, out of courtesy, write 
in longhand; smoking too much; not 
eating enough; deliberately staying 
up late when I should go to bed; talk¬ 
ing too much. 

I JUDGE PEOPLE BY: 

Their past performances. 

Their hands. I loathe white, indo¬ 
lent looking hands on women and in¬ 
effectual looking hands on men. I 
like big hands, broad hands that look 
as if they had actually worked. That 
goes for both men and women. 

Their attack. I mean, there is the 
type of woman who never looks at 
you. I prefer those who take a good 
look at me, face, hair, figure, what I 
have on; who figure how much com¬ 
petition they think I may have to 
offer, and behave accordingly. In 
order for me to like people, they have 
to be direct. 

Their manners. Not merely or 
necessarily the pleasant superficial 
such as opening doors, lighting cigar¬ 
ettes, being punctilious at table, but 
those with an inborn courtesy towards 
their fellow human beings which ac¬ 
cording to my definition, is kindli¬ 
ness. Kind people are the true gen¬ 
tlemen and gentlewomen. 

I NEVER JUDGE PEOPLE BY: 

Their eyes. For it is a well known 
tact that you can look the hardest 
criminal straight in the eye and he 
can return your look with the appar¬ 
ent candor, simplicity and innocence 
of a child. Far from being the ‘win¬ 
dows of the soul’, eyes are, in my 
opinion, the window shades. 

ONCE IN MY LIFE I’D LOVE TO: 

Stay in bed for twenty-four hours 



Rosalind Russell and hubby, Lt. Col. Fred 
Brisson. Her new picture, "Sister Kenny." 


without a phone call or a thing on 
my mind, period. I never spent a full 
day in bed in my life; except when I 
had the baby. When I try it, I last 
until about 3:30, then say, ‘I can’t 
stand this. I’m going crazy!’—and 
get up. 

Take a trip around the world with 
my husband and visit all the odd, out 
of the way places. 


I’VE BEEN THRILLED WITH: 

Every Christmas I’ve ever spent in 
my own home; paintings in the Sistine 
Chapel; Michaelangelo’s Moses; the 
expression in the eyes of women when 
they look at their babies; the Statue 
of Liberty; the New York skyline; 
dawns and twilights. 


I’M PROUD OF: 

Each and every man who served 
in the Allied Forces, including my 
husband and my three brothers. 

I BELIEVE: 

In God. 

In the great American Ideal and 
everything it stands for. 

That the world will have the good 
sense to submit its difficulties here¬ 
after to a world court, instead of 
fighting them out on the battlefield. 

I KNOW: 

That hard work is the best and sur- 
est cure for the many tragedies the 
individual has to endure. 


1 HOPE: 

That I can one day be very proud 
n ‘ B ^cause then I shall know 
tnat i have done one job well. 

The End 


What Can You Spare 
That They Can Wear? 

You befriended 25,000,000 war victims 
through the clothing collection of last 
spring. So many still need your help 
give coats, boots and shoes tied in pairs, 
dresses, underwear, suits, shawls, work 
shirts, sweaters, blankets, quilts, caps 
mittens to the Victory Clothing Collec¬ 
tion for overseas relief. And don't forget 
. . . lightweight clothing is needed in the 
Philippines. Round up all the clothing 
you can spare, and get your bundle to 
the Clothing Collection depot TODAY! 




















BLYTH SPIRIT 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 36) 


hospital bed with her head and feet 
lower than her tummy for days. 

“I was over a barrel, but back¬ 
wards,” she jests now. 

For nineteen more days she was in 
another kind of cast, unable to move. 
Then came the exciting ride home to 
Hollywood in an ambulance, which to 
her was “fun,” because she was 
propped up, could see out the windows 
and the driver gave her the thrill of 
riding through a few red traffic lights 
with the siren screaming. 

The next three months weren’t ex¬ 
actly fun, despite the kindness of her 
friends. All that while, in another 
cast, she could not leave her bed. Her 
doctor told her she would be lucky 
if she could get up in half a year. 
That’s when the Blyth made up her 
mind she would walk in less than six 
months. She was up and taking her 
first steps in three, but she had to 
learn to walk again. 

She still wears a brace—a steel rib¬ 
bed corset-like gadget that keeps her 
middle back straight—which isn’t 
noticeable and soon that, too, will go. 
Then comes the dancing and swim¬ 
ming which she loves. “I don’t think 
I’ll have to learn them over,” she 
says. 

Through those pain-racked hours in 
bed, Ann managed to do her school- 
work. She was in her last term of 
high school at the Universal studio 
school and wanted desperately to fin¬ 
ish so she could receive her diploma 


with the June graduating class at Los 
Angeles’ University High where movie 
children often have the fun of a 
formal graduation. That was her goal 
m wanting to walk by the end of 
June. She made it. 

Her step was slow, but the brown 
haired girl with the clear blue eyes 
was easily the prettiest girl graduate 
there. A happy glow lighted her face 
as she received her sheepskin. If any¬ 
one deserved congratulations, she did, 
for she had won her diploma over 
more difficulties than that one severe 
accident. 

Now seventeen, Ann has been an 
actress and singer for twelve years. 
Her schooling never was the every¬ 
day routine enjoyed by other kids; 
it had to be coordinated with broad¬ 
casts, personal appearances, stage per¬ 
formances. There was even a year 
when her lessons were done by cor¬ 
respondence while she was touring 
with “Watch on the Rhine.” 

She deserves all the credit she re¬ 
cently has been winning, especially 
since her outstanding performance as 
Joan Crawford’s daughter in “Mildred 
Pierce.” Yet she is the most modest, 
quiet, self-effacing actress around 
Hollywood. It’s almost difficult to be¬ 
lieve she is an actress, and particular¬ 
ly that she has been a professional 
since the age of five. 

There is an ethereal quality about 
the girl which is as baffling to de¬ 
scribe as it is to find in a seasoned 


trouper. She is without pretense, 
completely unsophisticated, utterly 
charming. 

She is a thoroughly natural 17- 
year-old, enthusiastic, and bubbling 
with good spirits. Her clothes are 
right for her age, not prematurely 
worldly. Her girl friends are school 
girls, not professionals. Her boy 
friends are her own age, not older 
actors. She might very well be grow¬ 
ing up in Hartford or Houston, in¬ 
stead of Hollywood, for the film city 
hasn’t changed her any more than 
her previous years in New York 
stage and radio work. 

Born on August 16, 1928, at Mt. 
Kisco, New York, .Ann was by the 
age of four singing in an assured, if 
childish, soprano, and when she heard 
other moppets singing on Madge 
Tucker’s - Children’s Hour on WJZ in 
New York, she wanted to do it too. 
When she was five, with long brown 
curls and big, big eyes, she audi¬ 
tioned. She isn’t sure what she sang 
but thinks it was “Lazy Bones.” Any- • 
way, she won a spot on the- program. 

From then on until 1942 she never 
entirely deserted radio, whatever her 
other activities might be, and they 
were legion. 

Soon after her radio debut Ann 
started singing lessons, studied danc¬ 
ing at the Ned Wayburn school, drama 
and radio technique. In addition to 
this artistic education she managed 
the more academic subjects at St. 
Stephen’s, St. Patrick’s and the Pro¬ 
fessional Children’s School, all in New 
York City. 

She was a “regular” on the Madge 
Tucker program, had a sustaining pro¬ 
gram, called “My Barn” on WJZ for 




EACH KIT CONTAINS: 

3 full ounces of salon-type cold wave 
solution with KURLIUM*, 60 curlers, 
60 end tissues, cotton applicators, 
neutralizer and complete instructions. 
Only Charm-Kurl SUPREME con¬ 
tains KURLIUM* the fast acting 
hair beautifier which assures perfect 
results on any head of natural hair. 
♦KURLIUM is U. 8. Registered 


KNOW THE JOY OF 


y (W€d 


In 2 to 3 Hours at Home 
Give Yourself the NEW 


# Complete Cold Waving process takes 
only 2 to 3 hours. 

% Cold Wave means longer lasting curls 
and waves. 

% Perfect comfort—no heat, no machines 
or heavy clamps. 

# M Takes’‘ wonderfully on soft, silky hair 
and on coarse hair too. 

# Ideal for children—gives long curls that 
comb out beautifully. 


SUPREME 

COLD WAVE 


with KURLIUM* 


yiovj 


ONLY 


98 « 


Plus 14c To* 


The new Charm - Kurl Supreme Home 
hit gives a better Cold ICave, because it is 
given closer to the scalp by an entirely new 
gentle process, resulting in longer lasting, 
softe^ lustrous natural looking curls. In 
fact, the result produced by the new 
Charm-Kurl Supreme will compare with 
any beauty shop cold wave costing up to 
$15.00 or more. Satisfaction guaranteed 
or money back. 


"Petite" 
(or children 


“Suave" 
for the elite 


"Glamour" 
lor'teen agers 


fOI SALE AT DRUO STORES . COSMETIC COUNTERS AND 3c AND IOc STORES 




71 









ORDER BY MAIL FROM HOLLYWOOD! 



This gay, young two-tone jumper has the 
new ‘‘corselette” waistband that laces up 
...makes your waist look ever so sliml 
Beautifully made of rich all-year rayon, 

Sizes 10 to 18. Red, Aqua, Powder Blue, 
Navy—with color contrast. $£98 

plus postage 


“Blouse Beauty"— Heavenly WHITE rayon 
with ruffled cuffs. Sizes 32 to 38. $3.98 
plus postage. 

SEND NO MONEY—WE MAIL C. O. D. 

Bern co-tv of Hollywood 

Dept. 389, 6253 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 

BETTY CO-ED OF HOLLYWOOD, DEPT. 389 J 

■ 6253 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. J 

■ Please send me “Hcur- Glass” Jumper at J5.98plus postage. I 
| Red □ Aqua □ Powder Blue □ Navy (j 

i (Mark 1st & 2nd Color Choice) ■ 

J Sizes 10 12 t4 16 18 (Circle size wanted) I 

| Please send me “Blouse Beauty” at 53.98 plus postage- I 
| Sizes: 32 34 36 38 (Circle size wanted) | 

j NAME. | 

I ADDRESS... 1 

j CITY.ZONE.STATE. 


I 

J 


five years, and was on many soap 
operas and other commercial pro¬ 
grams over major networks. AND, 
she sandwiched in singing for three 
seasons with the San Carlos Opera 
Company. 

“Acting and singing were as much 
fun to me as the games other chil¬ 
dren enjoyed. That was my ‘playing’ 
I guess,” says Ann. 

Her arresting performance as Ba- 
bette in the long stage run of “Watch 
on the Rhine” paved the way to her 
big-time success. Despite the presence 
in the cast of such distinguished play¬ 
ers as Paul Lukas, Lucille Watson, 
John Lodge and George Coulouris, 
Ann won plenty of attention and was 
hailed by critics as a sensational child 
actress. 

Eleven months on Broadway pre¬ 
ceded a nine months’ tour on the 
road (that’s when she had her “cor¬ 
respondence courses”) with the critics’ 
accolades continuing. She was hon¬ 
ored by a party at the Astor Hotel in 
New York, with the orchestra playing 
her favorite tunes. When the show 
played Los Angeles, she was screen 
tested and signed to a contract by 
Universal. 

But all the triumphs she enjoyed at 
her impressionable age did not mea¬ 
sure up to her greatest thrill—a “com¬ 
mand performance” in Washington in 
1941 for President Roosevelt of 
“Watch on the Rhine,” followed by 
supper at the White House for the 
cast. 

“I met many official dignitaries and 
they were all very charming and in¬ 
teresting,” avers Ann, “but President 
Roosevelt was so wonderful. I fell in 
love with him right away. This year 
after my accident when I was lying 
in bed I used to think how much he 
achieved after he had infantile pa¬ 
ralysis, and that made it easier for 
me to concentrate on recovery.” 

A memento of that evening at the 
White House is Ann’s most treasured 
possession. It’s a book of paper 
matches with a blue cover, bearing 
the initials FDR, given to her by the 
President. 

“It was lost for a few months last 
summer. Just mixed in with other 
things at home, but I couldn’t find it 
and I was so worried I used to pray 
I’d recover it. Then one day just a 
few weeks ago, I did,” Ann tells one 
so seriously that you know she isn’t 
kidding about the importance of those 
matches. “The book is tattered now 
because I’ve shown it to so many 
people, but I’ll always treasure it.” 

After being signed for pictures Ann 
had to return to New York with the 
stage show for she was committed 
until it closed its run. Then she was 
whisked back to the Coast and made 
her screen bow in “Chip Off the Old 
Block” with Donald O’Connor and 
Peggy Ryan. Again, she captivated 
public and critics. 

In that and her other pictures at 
Universal—“The Merry Monahans,” 
Babes on Swing Street” and “Bowery 
to Broadway”—she sang, to every¬ 
one’s satisfaction but her own. She 
prefers to be recognized as a dra¬ 
matic actress. 

She had her wish when she was 
borrowed by Warners for “Mildred 
Pierce” in which she plays a mean, 
scheming, selfish girl from the age of 
14 to 19. Certainly the role is nothing 
like her own character, so that proves 
she has dramatic ability, and won’t 
have to count on lucky casting-breaks 
for roles that are “just right for 
her.” 

“I just tried to imagine how a girl 


like that would think and look and 
behave. I’d give myself a mental poke 
in the ribs. And the clothes helped. 
In the later scenes, they were so 
sophisticated and I could wear my 
hair up,” says our 17-year-old, with 
such naivete that one is reminded of 
a tiny child play-acting in her moth¬ 
er’s gown and high heeled shoes. 

- “It was difficult to be mean to Miss 
Crawford, as the script called for, be¬ 
cause she was so kind to me,” con¬ 
cedes Ann. “She’s wonderful!” 

Joan has been an idol of Ann’s 
since she was seven and saw her on 
Fifth Avenue one day. 

“She came out of Saks-Fifth Ave¬ 
nue just as I was walking by with 
Mother,” Ann recalls. “I recognized 
her and thought she looked so beau¬ 
tiful. I smiled and she smiled back. I 
was thrilled for weeks.” 

The first time she met Joan was 
during the New York run of “Watch 
on the Rhine” when Joan came back- 
stage to see Paul Lukas and was pre¬ 
sented to the child actress. “And she 
remembered that when we were in¬ 
troduced at Warners. Isn’t that mar¬ 
velous?” asks Ann with enthusiastic 
admiration. 

Fortunately, Ann had just com¬ 
pleted her role in “Mildred Pierce” 
when her accident occurred. Her 
greatest worry when she was first in 
the hospital was not about her re¬ 
covery but that she might be needed 
for retakes or added scenes. She 
wasn’t. 

During Ann’s invalid days, Joan 
used to write to her and send flowers. 
Charles Korvin, Universal’s new heart 
throb, came to see her regularly and 
in a vague way she says he is her 
“Dream Man”—as a type rather than 
an individual. Her “dates” are young¬ 
er. 

Eddie Ryan brought her an Afghan 
hound named Chad, which crowds 
things a bit in the apartment where 
Ann lives with her mother and older 
sister, but there is also room enough 
for Ann’s cat, Mickey. 

Ann is five feet two inches tall, 
weighs a sleek 103 pounds, has natu¬ 
rally curly long brown hair and uses 
no nail polish and only very little 
make up. 

Her full name is Ann Marie Blyth. 
She likes to read mysteries and 
browsed through a stack of them 
while recuperating. She adores going 
to the movies, collects autographs and 
has a complete album filled with the 
signatures of stars she has met in 
Hollywood. Her favorite actors, inter¬ 
estingly enough, are veterans Spencer 
Tracy, Walter Pidgeon and Paul 
Lukas. She likes Van Johnson “well 
enough” but he isn’t one of her fav¬ 
orites. 

She uses slang sparingly, does not 
like jive music nor jitterbug dancing. 
She likes to cook, says her best cul¬ 
inary achievements are salads and 
spaghetti. Her favorite foods are 
steak, lamb chops and peas. She pre¬ 
fers off-shades of red and blue for 
clothes. She sleeps from eight to ten 
hours every night, drinks at least a 
quart of milk a day, hates to eat 
breakfast but does, under the watch¬ 
ful eye of mother. Roses are her fav¬ 
orite flower. She misses the snow and 
white Christmases of the East. 

Ann looks forward to two things- 
doing a leading role in a big Techni¬ 
color musical comedy and learning to 
drive a car. 

. .With that Blyth spirit to goad her, 
it s a safe bet that she will do both 
one of these days. 

The End 


72 




















' WITHOUT RESORTING TO STARVATION 
DIETS OR HARMFUL DRUGS 



Give me 7 days —just one week, and I’ll prove to you 
free of cost that I can help you take off 10, 20—yes, 40 
or 50 pounds of excess weight. I’ll show you how easy 
it is to banish a spare tire waist line, and reduce bulging 
hips to normal size. You’ll weigh less, you’ll feel and 
look better in a week, that’s my promise. I’ll show 
you how to reproportion your figure to lovely, slender, 
attractive lines. And, when you are reduced, you can 
wear clothes, sizes smaller and again invite the 
admiration and praise of your family and friends. 
Yes—you’ll enjoy carefree days, exciting nights— 
and what’s more, your date book will again be filled. 
It’s easy, it’s fun to 



WALLACE, Creator of “Get Thin to 
Music” Coast to Coast 
Radio Program 


Read These Joyous 
Letters of Praise 

Never Felt Better 
“In 3 months I lost 40 pounds. 
Now I weigh 125 pounds. I ve 
never felt better in my life. 
Betty Blazek, Chicago. 


Mother Thrilled 

“I can never repay you or thank 
you enough. I am the Mother o 
two little girls. When I started 
with your method I weighed lo-, 
now I weigh 112 pounds^ Everyone 
says I look wonderful. Mrs. b. 
Wilton, Connecticut. 


Follows Doctor’s Advice 
“For fifteen years I had taken a 
certain remedy every day. My 
doctor advised me to follow your 
method. After four months, 1 do 
not have to take anything. 1 
want to thank you, for you are 
really doing wonders. Mrs 
Lee, Detroit. 


T. 


Now Wears Size 16 
“I formerly wore a size 20 dress, 
now I wear 16, and I am so 
thankful to you. My daughter 
who is 22, recently lost 22 pounds 
in 6 weeks.” Mrs. S. Nobles, 
Texas. 1 

• 

Grandmother Sings Praise 
“I am a grandmother. I feel swell 
and folks tell me I look younger 
every day,” Mrs. J. Nadwormk, 
Mich. 

• 

Business Woman Thrilled 
"It isn’t only that you make us 
sylphlike, but we feel so good and 
our health is improved. W. C. 
Seiffert, Cal. 


Regains Waistline 
“I even have a waistline again. 
My friends marvel at my figure 
and I tell them I owe it all to Wal¬ 
lace.” Mrs. N. Taylor, Illinois. 


66 Get Thin to Music" 

WITH WALLACE REDUCING RECORDS 

Yes—it is fun to reduce this new, easy way. My method works hand in hand with 
Nature. That’s why it brings such natural, gratifying, almost amazing results. Your 
circulation will be stimulated by natural means—no wonder you’ll look and feel 
better so quickly. Thousands of women, of all ages, are overjoyed with a new feel¬ 
ing of buoyant health and glowing vivaciousness by my method. If you want to 
regain a slender attractive figure—if you want to look your best, read my sensational 
offer. I’ll guarantee you’ll 

WEIGH LESS—FEEL BETTER —in a week 

Yes, that’s my promise to you. Mrs. P. Hawks, of 
Washington, D. C.—has recently written: “I’ve had 
the trial record only one week and have lost 5 pounds. 

I’m so pleased.” Others report equally gratifying results. 

There’s no mystery to my method—there’s no magic. 

I show you how to take off pounds of excess weight, by 
a new, easy and safe way. I’ll take all the risk, if 
you’ll make the test. 

FREE for 7 Days' Trial 

Don’t send a penny. Simply fill in and send coupon. 

By return mail, postage prepaid, I’ll send you a 
WALLACE reducing phonograph record and lesson 
to try for 7 days FREE, in your own home. Sent 
in plain wrapper. No obligation. This offer open 
only to women over 18. Address 

Wallace Records, Suite 997 
154 E. Erie St., Chicago 11, III. 



These are snapshots of Mrs. A. 
Peterson of New York, who re¬ 
ports she lost 40 pounds. 


MAIL THIS COUPON FOR 7 DAYS TRIAL 


Weigh Less 
Look Better 



WALLACE. Suite 997 

154 E. Erie St.. Chicago 11. III. 

Please send me FREE and POSTPAID your reducing record 
and lesson for 7 days’ FREE TRIAL. This does not obligate me 
in any way. I am over 18. 


NAME. 


ADDRESS. 

CITY.ZONE.STATE. 


I 

I 

I 

.J 


73 






















MADDEST ROMANCE IN TOWN 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 431 


RADIO GIRL 

SPetfemie 

LENDS AN 

UNSEEN ENCHANTMENT! 

This intriguing fragrance 
whispers romance .. . 
as its delicate perfume 
weaves a spell of sheer 
feminine loveliness. So 
exquisite... so appealing 
... So flattering. 

10C-25C 

AT BEAUTY 


had had a chance to consult Margaret. 
All I can hope is that such announce¬ 
ments become ex post facto,” said Mr. 
Eythe, clearly a man on the spot. 

“You’ll do a lot better waiting for 
me,” said Barbara, oozing critically 
away. “I’m making lots more dough 
than she is right now. And just think, 
I’m only 14. By the time I’m 21—as 
Margaret is now—I’ll have a pile of 
dough. Think it over, bub.” 

Bill grinned at the retreating back 
of his hoped-for sister-in-law. When 
he first met Barbara, her astringent 
delivery of lines had thrown him; by 
the time they were cast together, with 
Linda Darnell, Jeanne Craine and 
Cornel Wilde in “Centennial Sum¬ 
mer” he had become somewhat forti¬ 
fied. He could even repeat one of 
Barbara’s most startling cracks, to 
wit: she was playing the piano on 
the set one afternoon between scenes 
and someone said to her, “Golly, 
Barbara, you certainly can play. You 
look awfully convincing, seated be¬ 
fore that piano. Why, you even look 
like Chopin.” 

Responded Barbara’s cellar con¬ 
tralto, while her fingers missed never 
a note of a difficult score, “Nope, 
Chopin’s still got it on me. He could 
play and cough blood at the same 
time.” 

It may seem odd to start an account 
of a romance between Bill Eythe and 
Margaret Whiting with a protracted 
series of anecdotes about Margaret’s 
kid sister, Barbara, but such a criti¬ 
cism is unjust. The truth of the matter 
is that the Whitings, Eleanor (the 
mother), Margaret and Barbara, are 
held in almost equal esteem by Mr 
Ever-Lovin’ Eythe. Yes, we will grant 
Margaret a more intense shade of 
devotion, but to be honest, we must 
admit that Bill is enamoured of the 
entire family. 

It all started about four years ago. 
Tommy Noonan, formerly Ty Pow¬ 
er s stand-in and a wonderful guy in 
general, said to Bill one night, “Know 
the Whitings? You don’t? Man 
you ve never lived. Let’s roll over 
there tonight, and be prepared to 
have the time of your life.” 

. "J ea u + ? ’lu sai u- ?I U ’ who is inclined 

to doubt the highly touted. 

Twenty-four hours later he was 
L, Utt ^u"^° ling P e °pie to say, “Aren’t 
the Whitings out of this world? What 
talent! What charm! What a trio 1 ” 
The only really precise thing that 
Bill remembers abqut that first meet- 
with Margaret—aside from a general 
impression of rosy glow—is that she 
sang Louise, a song written by her 
father, the late Dick Whiting who also 
wrote, “Just A Japanese Sandman,” 
On The Good Ship Lolly Pop,” and 
Honey, plus dozens more. 

Everyone gathered around the 
piano that night, but after a few un¬ 
steady communal attempts at song 
the rest of the people in the room be¬ 
came an enthralled audience for 
Margaret. Thereafter, it was never 
necessary to twist Bill’s arm in order 
to get an opinion as to Margaret’s fu¬ 
ture. He will say, at the drop of a 
quarter rest, “Margaret will be con¬ 
sidered, by the fall of 1946, one of 
the foremost popular singers in the 
country. She has more talent than 
any other girl I have ever known ” 

But, four years ago, when Bill met 


Ball (Ciro's). Above, with Hedy Lamarr. 

her, she was seventeen and studying 
furiously. (When she wasn’t going to 
the beach with Bill, or yak-yaking 
with him in front of a fire on the 
Whiting hearth, or singing at the 
piano, that is.) 

One of the first things they per¬ 
fected was a type of language all 
their own; this is calculated to drive 
an outsider entirely dreams-by-Dali 
in forty minutes, but it’s fun if you’re 
in the know. Madness or amuse¬ 
ment—that’s the score. 

In this system of pretzeled linguis¬ 
tics, a jerk is a “krillbine,” but you 
can’t just say it like that. You are 
supposed to trill the r, linger with 
loving tongue over the double 1, then 
bite off the last syllable. Now try 
it: krrrrrillllbine. Far more insult¬ 
ing than the simple little word, jerk. 

, 22 carat, double-dyed, Dogpatch 

style krillbine is known to Bill and 
Margaret as a “crudfoo,” and there’s 
no reason to analyze the word- it 
stands on its own merit. 

Margaret smokes only Herbert 
Tarry ton cigarettes, but such an ap- 
pelation would be too simple for the 
speakers of a language we might as 
well call “Meythe,” a combination of 
Margaret & Eythe. (We refrain from 
mentioning that well-known play “Of 
Meythe And Men” at this point, al¬ 
though both Margaret and Bill would 
leap at the opportunity.) 

When Bill wants to know whether 
Margaret is ready for a cigarette, he 
inquires, “Voulez-vous une Tarang- 
arang-arang-arang-arye?” Further¬ 
more, in Meythe, a person who has 
partaken too freely of the Ciro cider 
i®. labeled a “fracturie-eye.” In 
Meythe, Bill calls Margaret “Thrush” 
ai \1>- S u e ca J ls h . im “Hambone.” 
cH Wl i t i 1 u this liberal education, you 
should have no trouble whatsoever in 

w e h£v, mg the ' following conversation 
Margareffnd Bin- 0 ” P ' aCe betwea " 
Bill: Look Thrush, a fracturie-eye. 
Marg a re t: Wow what a krillbine. 

crSfoo. y ° nd ,hat staee; he ' s “ 
Margaret: Lbt’s be nonchalant. 













Time for Tarang-arang-arang-arye, 
Hambone. 

Everyone else present when such 
a conversation takes place turns 
slightly apopletic. Bill and Margaret 
just have fun, as you would, too, hav¬ 
ing been initiated. This has the Op 
language from “Janie” silenced for¬ 
ever. 

But, between these two, there is a 
good deal more real comradeship and 
sensitive understanding than such 
light-hearted antics would indicate. 
Bill, particularly, is a worrier. He 
had never intended to be an actor. 
As you undoubtedly know, he was 
born in Mars, Pennsylvania, and went 
to Carnegie Tech where he took both 
his A.B. and his M.A. degrees in 
drama, but he intended to write plays, 
to produce and to direct. 

Because of his acutely developed 
critical facility, he tears himself to 
pieces when he sees himself on the 
screen. He wants to pass out and be 
carried, unrecognized, from the the¬ 
atre—such is his humility. 

Twentieth Century-Fox asked him 
to put in an appearance at the pre¬ 
miere of his latest picture “The House 
On 92nd Street,” a command that 
caused Mr. Eythe great suffering. For 
two days before the premiere, he was 
unable to eat solid food; he man¬ 
aged, under Margaret’s pleading— 
both telephonic and personal—to con¬ 
sume gallons of fruit juice and milk, 
but that was all. “I’ll go to that 
premiere and see myself lay an egg 
that would do justice to a grand¬ 
father ostrich,” moaned Bill. 

“A grand mother ostrich,” corrected 
Margaret. “And you’ll do nothing of 
the kind. I’ll bet it’s the best pic¬ 
ture you’ve done to date.” She 
reached into her pocket, fished out 
a parcel, and tossed it to Bill. “A 
token of my esteem, Hambone. And 
a preview of what I think the studio 
will think you deserve after this pic¬ 
ture is out,” she said. 

The object proved to be a solid gold 
cigarette lighter on which was en¬ 
graved, “To Hambone From Thrush.” 

It was, until recently, Bill Eythe’s 
most treasured possession. It would 
still be—if he had it. A few weeks 
ago, however, a friend of Bill’s noti¬ 
fied him that Paramount was going 
to preview “The Bride Wore Boots,” 
a Barbara Stanwyck picture, at the 
Academy Theatre in Inglewood. All 
unthinkingly, Fiji went to the pre¬ 
view. 

When he emerged into the foyer, 
intently discussing the picture with 
his friend, he was mobbed by bobby 
soxers. They knocked him down; 
someone grabbed Bill and pulled him 
to his feet before he should be 
trampled to death by saddle oxfords; 
by that time, a flying wedge of cops 
had formed to take Bill safely out 
of the theatre. When he was seated 
in his car, he discovered that some 
krillbine had lifted his pocket hand¬ 
kerchief, his pen and pencil set, and 
some crudfoo had made off with his 
solid gold lighter from Margaret. 
(If said Krillbine (or Crudfoo) hap¬ 
pens to read this account, may we 
suggest that you return the lighter to 
Miss Marian Rhea, 20th Century-Fox 
Studios, 10201 West Pico Boulevard, 
Los Angeles 34, California. Miss Rhea 
will see that the lighter is in Bill’s 
happy fist within an hour of receipt.) 

In addition to cheering Bill when 
the going has been tough, Margaret 
is a highly interesting intellectual 
companion. She and Bill discuss cur¬ 
rent books by the hour; each is an 




HERE IS THRILLING NEW HOPE... 



f MAKE \ 
THIS EASY 

7-DAY 

L TEST / 


PREVENT BRITTLElENDS 
FROM BREAKUrl OFF 

Here is grilling new hope if ypu want 
your dry,'Hi > steH^^|^»S^I#]fttle and 
breaking offkauFnjuch lovelier— longer. 
Yes, hair mdj^get fqipger—the scalp and 
hair condition befi^J jpthert^ise normal—if the 
hateful, breakhig^lf^ dryjbrittle ends can 
be retarded,. Th^f’s, why the Juelene SYSTEM 
is such a^ proven way to h£fp your hair gain its 
normal beauty. You see, this wonderful SYS- 
TEM helps relieye' hair dryness that is caused 
by lack o^apatural oils. It helps gofteri harsh, brittle ends, thus 
giving your hair a chance to get longer once the breaking-off 
and the splitting ends have been curbed,* So if your hair is dry, 
rough and hard to keep neat, try the easy Juelene SYSTEM for 
just 7 days. See if Juelene’s tendency tq soften harsh, difficult- 
to-manage hair can help your hair to become softer, silkier, more 
lustrous than it has been before— in justqne short week! Truly 
you may win compliments from both men and women who ad¬ 
mire and enyy your hair in its new lovely beauty. Clip coupon! 

THRILLING RESULTS, orYour Money Back! 

That’s all we ask you to do. Just make the con¬ 
vincing Juelene test for 7 days and see for your¬ 
self if your brittle, splitting hair can be softened, 
made more lovely. Your mirror will tell you the 
thrilling results and so will your friends! If you 
aren’t absolutely amazed with the glistening 
sheen ... if you aren’t delighted with the ease in 
which you can manage your hair, we will refund 
every cent of your money. What could be fairer? 
So don’t wait. MAIL THE COUPON right now. 

NOW... Mail This Trial Coupon! 


Marvelous Help 

FOR DRY, BRITTLE HAIR 

Try JUELENE. Why be ashamed of 
unlovely dry hair when it may be so 
easy to make It beautiful ? See how 
much more beautiful your hair may 
be In just 7 short days, after the dry 
hair condition has been relieved. 
This amazing introductory offer 
gives you an opportune chance to 
prove to yourself that you, too, may 
overcome the handicaps of dryness 
and have sparkling LONGER Hair! 
Be convinced ! — Send for it now ! 


/ JUEL COMPANY, Dept. M-601 

4727 North Damen, Chicago 25, III. 

I want easy-to-manage, longer hair. I will try the 
JUELENE SYSTEM for 7 days. If my mirror 
doesn’t show satisfactory results, I will ask for 
my money back. 

Q I am enclosing $1.00 
□ Send C.O.D. plus Gov’t charges 


NAME. 


JUEL COMPANY 

47 27 NORTH DAMEN 
.DeptM-601. CHICAGO25,ILL. 


ADDRESS_ 

CITY_Zone_STATE.- 

Our Customers are Given Extra Gifts/ 


75 















%^—Hair Rinse 
Gives a Tiny Tint 

and ... 

Removes 
this; 
du 
fill 


1. Does not harm, permanently 
tint or bleach the hair. 

2. Used after shampooing — your 
hair is not dry, unruly. 

3. Instantly gives the soft, lovely 
effect obtained from tedious, 
vigorous brushings . . . plus a 
tiny tint— in these 12 shades. 

1. Black 7. Titian Blonde 

2. Dark Copper 8. Golden Blonde 

3. Sable Brown 9. Topaz Blonde 

4. Golden Brown 10. Dark Auburn 

5. Nut Brown 11. Light Auburn 

6. Silver 12. Lustre Glint 

4. The improved Golden. Glint 
contains only safe certified 
colors and pure Radien, all 
new, approved ingredients. 

Try Golden Glint ...Over 50 million 
packages have been sold...Choose 
your shade at any cosmetic dealer. 
Price 10 and 25 $ — or send for a 

i FREE SAMPLE —. n 


Please send color No.. 

Name_ 

Address._ 


. as listed above. 


GOLDEN GLINT 



Are you 

MUtWBIK? 

from loss of 

BUKMHRON? 

Ml Here’s One Of The Best ■ 
Home Ways To Build Up Red Blood! 

You girls who suffer from simple 
anemia or who lose so much during 
monthly periods that you are pale, feel 
tired, weak, "dragged out”—this may 
be due to low blood-iron— 

So start today—try Lydia E. Pink- 
ham’s TABLETS—one of the greatest 
blood-iron tonics you can buy to help 
build up red blood to give more 
strength and energy—in such cases. 

Pinkham’s Tablets help build up the 
red quality of the blood (very im¬ 
portant) by reinforcing the haemo¬ 
globin of red blood cells. 

Just try Pinkham’s Tablets for 30 
days—then see if you, too, don’t re¬ 
markably benefit. All drugstores. 

Lydia E. Pinkham’s TA81CTS 


admirer of Philip Wylie; each knows 
a great deal of both classic and mod¬ 
ern experimental poetry. One night 
Bill mentioned some of the poetry 
of D. H. Lawrence. 

“You’re out of your mind,” said 
Margaret. “D. H. Lawrence never 
wrote a line of poetry in his life.” 

“Hmmmmmm,” said Mr. Eythe. “I 
will check with you later.” In the 
next mail, Miss Doubting Whiting re¬ 
ceiving a volume of Lawrence poems. 
She has since been very guarded in 
her statements about Bill’s mental 
condition. When he announced that 
he was reading a book entitled “When 
Worlds Collide,” she nodded sagely 
and said that she’d like to borrow it 
as soon as he had finished. She is 
going to be astounded when she dis¬ 
covers that the work is a Jules Verne 
sort of thing, at the opposite literary 
pole from the Lawrence verse. 

Bill and Margaret are tireless beach 
enthusiasts; practically every night 
during the spring, summer and fall, 
they drive to Ocean Park or Venice 
(fifteen miles from Hollywood) and 
investigate the Midway. They ride 
the roller coaster, the water slide, 
the whirling airplanes, and the tub- 
snapper. They eat popcorn, candied 
apples, pronto pups (hot dogs cooked 
in batter then smeared with mus¬ 
tard), and half-frozen ice cream. 

Neither is a very good shot, so they 
have avoided the shooting gallery. 
Both are wowser wingmen with a 
baseball versus a pyramid of milk 
bottles; at this concession they have 
won kewpie dolls with crooked faces, 
red plaster Scotties, and hideous, 
long-necked green plaster cats. 

By the time you read this, Bill will 
be living in his new house in San 
Fernando valley, but for several years 
he has lived in a flat not too far dis¬ 
tant from the Whiting’s house. Oc¬ 
casionally all three Whitings would 
join Bill for an evening of listening 
to recordings. 

Bill owns four dogs and a cat. The 
dogs are: two Irish setters named 
Sheila and Shellalagh; ohe springer 
spaniel named Oscar, although she is 
a girl dog; and one dachshund named 
Bonnet. Yes, it’s an odd name for a 
dog. The title was applied because 
the dachshund is male; thus it is 
possible for Bill, in facetious moments, 
to refer to this character as “My son 
Bonnet.” Yuk, yuk, yuk. 

The four dogs are wild about Mar¬ 
garet, but the cat is jealous. Yet, in 
true feminine style, the cat tried to 
kill Bill. He was lying on the floor, 
listening to recordings one night 
after Margaret had gone home, when 
he became aware of the cat’s baleful 
glare. She was sitting in the window 
just above Bill’s head, and she was 
favoring him with the same expres¬ 
sion an unfortunate citizen sees in 
the eyes of a stickup. 

“Oh, settle down,” said Bill, and 
went on listening to the music. From 
the tail of his eye he thought he saw 
a malicious paw dart out and scoot 
the heavy solid crystal ashtray an 
inch nearer the edge of the sill, but 
he dismissed the idea as absurd. He 
looked at the cat. The cat studied the 
ceiling. 

A few second later—Crash!—down 
came the ashtray a scant inch from 
Bill’s head. The cat leapt from her 
sill and trotted into the next room 
emitting over her shoulder a sound 
that could be interpreted only as 
profanity. 

If the cat disapproves of her 
master marrying Margaret, hers is 


the only dissenting voice to be heard. 

Bill first proposed to Margaret after 
they had come home from a party one 
night. It was late, and they had en¬ 
joyed themselves thoroughly; they 
. had laughed and danced and entered 
into one of those delicious moments 
that happen only when two people 
are in love. 

Abruptly Bill said, “Let’s quit all 
this yak-yak and get serious. Let’s 
get back into my car and drive to 
Las Vegas. In short—let’s get mar¬ 
ried.” 

Both Bill and Margaret are Catho¬ 
lic, so Margaret said softly, “Bill, 
you know and I know that we really 
don’t want to marry in that way. Be¬ 
cause of our convictions, we have to 
do things in a traditional way. Then, 
too, we have a lot to discuss. You 
and I must be sure that we can make 
our marriage last, not for just a week 
or a month or a year, but forever.” 

There are some problems: Bill’s ca¬ 
reer is established in Hollywood. If, 
as everyone expects, Margaret should 
make a tremendous hit in New York, 
she might want to remain there. Mar¬ 
garet and Bill have seen too many at¬ 
tempts at long-distance marriage to 
believe that such an arrangement has 
much chance of permanence. 

However, Margaret is exactly as 
quixotic as Bill; having made a suc¬ 
cess, it would be like her to renounce 
it and return to preside over Bill’s 
new house as a very happy Mrs. 
Eythe. 

So, here’s a prediction in the best 
tradition of Hollywood: as you read 
this, Margaret and Bill may already 
be married. If they aren’t, don’t sell 
the romance short because it may 
still, in six months or a year, pro¬ 
duce a merger. After all, Meythe is 
a language that should go on and on 
and on, happily ever after. 

The End 


AS WE GO TO PRESS ... 

According to the Hollywood columnists, oil 
is not beer and skittles with the Bill Eythe- 
Margaret Whiting cross-country romance 
Margaret's the gal who came to N. Y. after 
singing her way to fame with "It Might As 
Well Be Spring. The chill developed after 
a telephone conversation the other evening. 
Probably |us* lover’s tiff-stuff for this four- 
year courtship. 



Tempus Fugit Dept. Roddy McDowall has 
an adulf role in "Holiday In Mexico." 
Above, Jane Powell and Peggy Garner. 
















Are you in the know? 


For that wee-waisted look, she'd better — 

□ Give up breathing 

□ Minimize the midriff 

□ Try corset laces 


The "doll-waisted” style and your chubby 
waistline don’t seem made for each other? 
Better minimize that midriff! Stand erect, feet 
together, arms stretched overhead. Bend torso 
right and left as far as possible (feel the pull!) 
. . . working up to 25 times daily. On "certain” 
days you can look trim, even in your snuggest 
outfit. With Kotex, no revealing outlines nag 
you — for Kotex has flat tapered ends that don't 
show. And to help you stay dainty, there’s a 
deodorant in Kotex. Gals who rate appreciate 
this grooming aid! 




Does a square shaped hand indicate • 
Q An inquiring mind 
G An impulsive nature 
□ A dynamic personality 


LITTLE AUDREY 

ICONTINUED FROM PAGE 281 


know a soul in California, and when 
she reported for work, the studio was 
so anxious to make use of her talents 
with the least possible delay, that 
from the beginning her life was a 
frantic business of tests and fittings 
and scripts to study. Audrey had been 
one of the busiest girls in radio before 
she signed for pictures, and she 
thought she knew all about hard work; 
but nothing she had experienced pre¬ 
viously had prepared her for this 
schedule. 

“So this,” she used to tell herself, 
collapsing on the lumpy hotel bed in 
the evening, “this is Hollywood!” 

Audrey thinks now that at that time, 
she was probably the loneliest girl in 
California in her hours after work. If 
the work itself, hadn’t been so excit¬ 
ing and filled with promise, she prob¬ 
ably would have dissolved in tears and 
fled badk to New York in quite under¬ 
standable dismay. What she didn’t 
know at the time, was that almost 
from the first day she reported for 
work,'she became what is known in 
film jargon as a “Who’s that?” girl— 
which means simply that everyone 
was noticing her and asking about 
her—she’s that pretty and emanates 
that kind of radiance. But no one told 
her. But the arduous routine began 
to seem less so when she was cast in 
“Main Street After Dark.” When she 
actually started to work in a picture, 
she began to meet people and to make 
friends. 

Then—oh, wonderful break!—Aud¬ 
rey encountered a friend from New 
York, Sondra Rogers, who had had the 
good fortune to find a charming apart¬ 
ment in Westwood, big enough foe 
two girls, and who instantly invited 
Audrey to share it with her. Now 
Audrey had a home and could retrieve 
her belongings from storage, unpack 
her trunks, and cease to be “the lone¬ 
liest girl. . . Her roles in “For 
Better Or Worse,” with June Ally son, 
Hume Cronyn and Bob Walker; and 
“The Postman Rings Twice,” with 
John Garfield and Lana Turner, fol¬ 
lowed immediately, so she has been 
working harder, if possible, than she 
did at first. But now it’s fun; and she 
has g home and everything is lovely. 

Audrey has gorgeous, red-blonde 
hair, electric blue eyes and a peaches- 
and-cream complexion to make you 
wail with envy. So-o-o she has been 
made up as an exciting brunette in 
her two most important pictures. This 
doesn’t seem to puzzle her as much as 
it does me. She is a girl who takes 
things in her stride and besides—she 
does make a luscious brunette, at that! 

She loves to tell you that she was 
born in Joliet, Illinois, because, she 
says, “Could anything be more thor¬ 
oughly and satisfyingly middle west?” 
The eldest of the five children of John 
Michael and-Ida Trotter, Audrey was 
exposed to the delights of acting in 
Joliet High School plays, and decided 
forthwith that a stage career was dis¬ 
tinctly for her. Her parents were hor¬ 
rified, having set their hearts upon 
her going to the University. 

“The idea seemed to be,” says Aud¬ 
rey, “that a University degree was a 
sort of safeguard for a girl. If she 
happened to be one of those unfor¬ 
tunates who was unable to snare a 
husband within a reasonable time, she 



Your hand can reveal your traits and tem¬ 
perament! Have you a square shaped hand? 
If so, palmists say you’re a practical soul; 
self assured. You have an inquiring mind — 
which is good, for it helps you make wise 
decisions. And when you inquire about sani¬ 
tary protection, and learn that Kotex has 
lasting softness (doesn’t just "feel” soft at 
first touch) . . . that Kotex is made to stay 
soft while wearing . . . it’s ten to one you’ll 
decide on Kotex. Because you value real 
comfort. No wonder you’re self-assured! 


If the lady doesn't laugh, would you 
consider her — 

□ A pickle-pan 

□ Dracula’s mother 

□ Justified 


This little lap-lander didn’t mean to 
tumble. But to the lady it’s the last 
straw. She’s tired of being pushed 
around by boisterous characters. The 
lady’s justified. Accidents and a "who 
cares ?”attitude too often go together. 
That’s worth pondering., .on"those” 
days, as well, for if you use care in 
choosing a sanitary napkin, you’ll 
choose Kotex — and avoid mishaps. 
Yes, Kotex’ exclusive safety center 
gives you extra protection from 
problem-day accidents! 




Contains a deodorant 
at no extra cost! 


*T. M. Bok. U. 8. P«t. Off. 


More women c/joose /COTEX' 


Y/ian a// oY/jer sarn/Yary napkins 































BY MAIL FROM, HOLLYWOOD! your. 





WOVlE-OtA'"— efywher .l 

jacks' has . n *!?dded shoulders. 
woy. ® r ° od iJr Skirt hos Talon APP 

Smooth poehe's- Sk^ (root k|||C 

2K-SlSS?fl , SS J HI!1 

aK 3 j«jSrKi ■'"• . 

or5 ! (See OOP (0 , S H< 0 » 0 

a* «. — *» “ 

.OZMSSSi""-*'" 


HOLLYWOOD MAID, Dept. 233 

*546 HOLLYWOOD BLVO., HOLLYWOOD 28. CALIF- 
PI«ose I»d “HoBywowl Bhrd.” Two.Pi«« Suit OI *10 ,s 

(Mork lu & 2nd ckoic. of color) p |„, P o,iog. 

Horizon Cray Q California Brown □ Heaven Blue n 
Sue; 10 12 14 16 18 (Circle size wanted) 

Send "Sweetheart Blouse” of iirip.d ro/on jertey oi 
00.95. phM portage (Not illuilroted—Some money bock 

gooronteej Red Stripe □ Blue stripe □ 
Sue; 32 34 36 38 (Circle size wanted) 


Nome (Pleoce pO,n,’)_ 
V Sfre*t_ 

City- 


- Zone. 


78 


could always earn a ‘respectable’ liv¬ 
ing, teaching school.” 

Family opposition to her plans for 
a career were so formidable that Aud¬ 
rey set her pretty teeth and took a 
job selling floor wax from door to 
door to pay for dramatic lessons. The 
lessons led her to some engagements 
in summer stock and finally—some¬ 
what timorously—to Chicago where 
she amazed herself by. obtaining the 
lead opposite Ian Keith in “The Cop¬ 
perhead.” Next came the road show 
of “My Sister, Eileen,” during which 
she added to her store of geography 
by visiting every important city in the 
United States. 

Then radio. If you are a consistent 
radio listener, you have heard Audrey 
giving with all kinds of voices and dia¬ 
lects. She has played every possible 
type of character in nearly every day¬ 
time serial on the air, as well as on 
some of the most important of the eve¬ 
nings programs. She can do nearly 
anything with that throaty voice of 
hers, and is practically a one-woman 
theatrical troupe. Such versatility 
was bound to be noticed sooner or 
later, and when the Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer talent scout investigated and 
found that the owner of all this talent 
also possessed a lovely face and a 
most alluring set of curves under¬ 
neath it—well, Hollywood positively 
yodeled at Audrey! 

Allowed to look at the screen test 
she made in New York, Audrey made 
just one remark. She said, slowly 
and emphatically, “Oh—NO!” and 
dashed instantly to the agent to implore 
him to conclude negotiations he had 
begun for a part for her on Broadway. 
But studio officials didn’t share her 
pessimism and presently she found 
herself gasping a bit as she signed that 
nice contract. As a matter of record 
Audrey was so excited that on her last 
broadcast before leaving for Holly¬ 
wood, she pulled a wonderful bloop. 

While reading a commercial, she was 
supposed to say, “Use Blank’s cream, 
Tissue it off and leave a light film of 
the cream on your face overnight.” 
What she actually advised her bewild¬ 
ered listeners to do was, “Use Blank’s 
cream. Tissue it off and leave a light 
film of skin on your face overnight.” 
Her sponsors understood, however 
had a good laugh and forgave her. 

The very first thing Audrey did— 
when she and Sandra moved into the 
two-bedroom apartment before they 
even had chairs to sit on—was to un¬ 
pack her collection of elephants. This 
collection was started one day in New 
York when she was walking down 
Madison Avenue with one Colonel 
Meyers—the very one who piloted 
President Roosevelt and President 
Truman on some of their most im¬ 
portant missions. They paused to gaze 
into a shop window filled with carved 
trinkets and Audrey exclaimed over 
a coquettish jade elephant. “I’ve al¬ 
ways adored circuses,” she explained 
“and circuses mean elephants.” You 
can’t possibly guess what happened 
after that—but the following day the 
jade elephant arrived at her apart¬ 
ment with the compliments of the 
Colonel. That started it, and since 
then she has added big ones and little 
ones—cheap ones and very rare, ex¬ 
pensive ones—to her collection. She 
makes only one stipulation: the beast 
must have his trunk raised—never 
drooping. 

“It’s a superstition, I suppose,” she 
admits. “I do feel strongly about it 
but it was accidental, really. It simply 


PAZO WILL RELIEVE 
THOSE PAINFUL SIMPLE PILES 


W St -r'J 1 

if 




yMOTHER, PAZO CERTAINLY 
BROUGHT PROMPT RELIEF 



Don’t just suffer the agonizing pain, 
torture, itching of simple piles. Re¬ 
member, for over thirty years amazing 
PAZO ointment has given prompt, 
comforting relief to millions. It gives 
you soothing, welcome palliative relief. 

HOW PAZO OINTMENT WORKS 

1. Soothes inflamed areas—relieves pain 
and itching. 2. Lubricates hardened, 
dried parts, helps prevent cracking and 
soreness. 3. Tends to reduce swelling 
and check minor bleeding. 4. Provides 
quick and easy method of application. 

SPECIAL PILE PIPE FOR 
EASY APPLICATION 

Pazo ointment tube has a specially de¬ 
signed, perforated Pile Pipe, making 
application simple and thorough. Ask 
your doctor about wonderful Pazo oint¬ 
ment and the soothing, blessed relief 
it gives for simple piles. 

PAZO SUPPOSITORIES TOO! 

Some persons, and many doctors, pre¬ 
fer to use suppositories. So Pazo is also 
made in handy suppositories. Same 
soothing relief! Get Pazo in the form 
you prefer, at your druggists today. 

A Product of 

THE GROVE LABORATORIES INC. • S». Louis, Mo. 


BLONDES! 




iH 


New Home Shampoo 
Made Specially for Blondes 
Washes Hair Shades Lighter SAFELY 

Mf! blo ? des - ** shampoo 
• 5- h .? ,r from darkening—bright¬ 

ens faded hair. Called Blondex, its rich cleans- 
mg lather instantly removes the dingy film 
that makes hair dark, old-looking. Takes only 
11 minutes at home. Gives hair lustrous hieh- 

dr^anri^ri °' children - °« Blondex at 10c. 
drug and department stores. 




















happened that my first elephant was 
a ‘trunk-UP’ fellow. If he’d been a 
‘trunk-down’ one, I’d probably have 
been just as fussy about it that way.” 

It seemed quite logical to the two 
girls that, once the elephants were un¬ 
packed, the apartment should be fur¬ 
nished and decorated to suit them. So, 
there is a Chinese motif: pale green 
wells and flamingo-red chairs, char¬ 
treuse upholstery and black lacquered 
low tables strewn about. The ele¬ 
phants are everywhere, of course. 

The entire effect is stunning and the 
few people in Hollywood who have 
seen it have twittered at the origi¬ 
nality and the lovely sense of Oriental 
color. 

If you were one of the half dozen or 
so people who had been invited to a 
Sunday night supper in these exotic 
surroundings, guess what you would 
have had to eat! You’re wrong. Not 
a thing that requires chop sticks. You’d 
have had Swedish food—that’s what 
you would have had. Smorgasbord, 
brown pea soup, Swedish pancakes 
and a wonderful fish dish (which I 
can’t spell) with a mustard sauce such 
as you never tasted before—and little 
Swedish cookies, all made according 
to recipes which Audrey’s mother 
brought from Sweden years ago and 
taught her daughter to cook! 

Her own favorite foods are green 
olives, corn on the cob and Vichy- 
soisse! 

This up-and-coming star has been 
so busy that she hasn’t furnished her 
bedroom beyond the bare necessities. 
She hasn’t even decided whether to 
fill it with ruffles and fluff, or to make 
it severely tailored and stream-lined. 
“Whatever I do to it, you can be sure, 
it will be extreme,” she explained, 
“and the predominating color will be 
green.” 

Audrey loves all shades of green 
nearly as much as she detests any 
shade of orange. The latter color ac¬ 
tually makes her angry and uncom¬ 
fortable. She loves to wear green— 
any shade, from the subdued forest 
hues to brilliant emerald. It makes 
her feel “right.” 

Her habits of dress have changed 
completely since she came' to the 
Coast. “I always wore dark, tailored 
things in New York, as nearly every¬ 
one else does. I never went anywhere 
without a hat and gloves. I even made 
a hobby of collecting hats. But in 
California everyone is so gay and in¬ 
formal; clothes are brightly colored 
and seem to be made for sunshine and 
enjoyment. I love it—and I’ve scarcely 
had a hat on my head since I arrived, 
except for little jeweled beanies with 
evening clothes, on the few occasions 
I’ve had on evening clothes!” 

She is filled with admiration at what 
she calls “Hollywood grooming.” “It’s 
difficult to explain,” she said. “It’s 
some subtle thing they do to women 
in studio wardrobe departments and 
make-up rooms—something they do in 
shops out here and in beauty parlors. 
It isn’t just clothes or make-up or 
fancy hair-dos. It’s more than that, 
it’s something that makes a woman 
know how to make clothes mean more 
than just garments; how to make even 
her hair or the shape of her mouth 
mean something. ‘Hollywood groom¬ 
ing’ gives you poise and a sense of the 
value of details. It’s a psychological 
as well as a physical thing.” 

Audrey, you see, studies her job. She 
thinks you prepare for an acting ca¬ 
reer as carefully and with as much 
concentration as you would for a ca¬ 


reer in medicine or law. She views 
with apprehension the prospects of 
young actors who are plunged into 
overnight success with almost no 
preparation. 

She loves to dance and hike and 
ride, and she swims a little. She is 
learning golf but is a touch discour¬ 
aged about it. She isn’t extravagant 
about anything, she thinks, excepting 
books and gloves—even though she 
rarely wears gloves any more. When 
depressed, she splurges on new (to 
her) fragrances in colognes. Not ex¬ 
otic, expensive perfumes, but fresh, 
flower scented colognes. 

Unpunctual people are a source of 
irritation to her, and as a result, fre¬ 
quently Audrey finds herself fuming 
with impatience because she seems to 
be the only person in California who 
ever arrives anywhere when she says 
she will. This leads to slightly murder¬ 
ous feelings in her breast directed at 
the people who start to go home from 
somewhere and pause at the door to 
indulge in the most important conver¬ 
sation of the evening—until everyone’s 
else feet are aching. 

She is violently opposed to gossip; 
so violently, indeed, that she fre¬ 
quently astonishes people who start 
conversations with “Have you heard?" 
Without waiting for another word, she 
announces, “I don’t believe it!” and 
turns on her heel and marches away. 
She finds this very efficacious. 

About marriage, Audrey is very 
vague. “I think it’s a splendid thing,” 
she says, rather bewilderedly. “I’m 
sure I want it in my life—some day. 
But somehow I can’t visualize it—can’t 
imagine it—for mysdlf. It’s real 
enough for other people, but it never 
seems quite real in relation to me." 

She would rather go to the moun¬ 
tains than to the seaside because 
mountains stimulate her. Still, if she 
is very tired, the sound of the ocean 
makes her sleepy and she likes that. 
If she had her way, she would like al¬ 
ways to spend autumn in New York— 
and all the springtimes practically 
anywhere else. She was never super¬ 
stitious about anything until she be¬ 
came connected with the theater and 
had a thorough training in supersti¬ 
tion. It began with the day an old- 
time actor heard her whistling in her 
dressing room and rushed in to make 
her turn around three times and then 
spit. After that she learned a lot 
about superstitions. 

The only really expensive thing 
Audrey expects to buy when she 
achieves the success which seems so 
well assured now, is an emerald. One 
lovely, perfect, emerald. That’s for 
luck, too, and because it has the flash¬ 
ing, glowing essence of green—the 
color that makes her feel so “right 
inside.” 

The End 


FIGHT 

INFANTILE 

PARALYSIS 


JANUARY 14-31 




WATERPROOF-SHOCKPROOF 


Anti-mcgnetic, radium dial and hands, 
stainless :teel beck, unbreakable crystal, 
precision tested. 

No GF 195 JOCQC 

15 jewels, >.0101! second h^nd. CJ.Jd 

No. GR 2 1 2 $l?Rn 

17 jewels, sweep second fond *t£.UU 

No. GR 189 SFLF-WINTING jjq cn 

17 jewel', sweep second hand. *T%J«wU 

Mail Orders Promptly Filled. Postpaid. Fed. Tax Incl. 
W ife for Free Illustrated Booklet GR" 

BELL WATCH COMPANY 

Time and Life Bldg., Rockefeller Center, New York20, N. Y. 


SANAPAK GIVES 
NEW COMFORT 

for those difficult 
days of the month! 

Sanapaks, the new safety -plus sani¬ 
tary napkins, give you triple protec¬ 
tion! They are made with three special 
layers .. . including the famous "Pink 
Back”! 

Shaped to fit without bulk, without 
chafing, Sanapaks are so comfortable 
you’ll forget you’re wearing them! 
They’re faced with soft cotton too — 
for even greater com¬ 
fort ! Sanapaks cost 
no more than ordinary 
napkins. 


79 



















"HOW COULD I THINK OF TOMORROW WHEN BILL'S 
ARMS WERE SO TIGHT AROUND ME." 


Every night REAL STORIES FROM 
REAL LIFE brings you true dramatic incidents 
in the lives of real people . . . people 

like yourself who have the same prob¬ 
lems, the same cares and heartaches, the 

same moments of great happiness. These 
real stories about real people are tlirillingly 
complete—packed with the urgency of 
every day living. Listen to REAL STORIES 
FROM REAL LIFE tonight . . . and every 
weekday night ... on your local Mutual 
station. 


HEAR • • • 

"Heal Stories Front Real Life 99 

EVERY DRAMATIZATION A COMPLETE, FULL-LENGTH STORY 
SPONSORED BY WHITEHALL PHARMACAL CO. 

MONDAY THRU FRIDAY NIGHTS . . . 9:15—9:30 E.S.T., 

YOUR MUTUAL STATION 


80 


DIARY OF A DOTING DAD 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 49) 


without an instant’s hesitancy, “I 
liked the little boy very much.” 

That is the milestone I felt I should 
mention. At the age of two, you have 
emerged into true femininity; you 
have learned to discriminate among 
your guests, and to find the male 
member to your liking. I had thought 
to be spared the problems of the 
father of a nubile daughter for many 
years . . . ah, how the impetuosity of 
today’s extreme youth catches us un¬ 
awares. (When you are fifteen, Judy, 
you and I are going to have a great 
laugh out of the above entry in the 
diary of a perplexed pop.) 

March 12, 1945 

Baby, I’m about to become a re¬ 
formed character, and no foolin’. All 
men, my dear, are occasionally rough 
and forthright of speech; you’ve never 
heard me at my fire-sulphur-and- 
brimstone best, of course, but you 
have overheard an occasionally ex¬ 
plosive observation. I didn’t realize 
how easy it would be for you to em¬ 
brace my favorite expletive. When I 
don’t like a character,. I usually dis¬ 
miss him by saying, “That jerk!” 

Yesterday you toddled into the 
kitchen in time to see the cook spill 
a generous puddle of hot water on 
the floor. You strolled over, squatted, 
and slapped your hand in the ex¬ 
temporaneous lake, finding it plenty 
hot. Straightening, your eyes blazing, 
you said to the cook, “You’re a jerk!” 

It happened that I passed the door 
in time to catch that line of dialogue. 

I snatcHed you into the other room, 
after apologizing to the cook for you, 
and admonished to wit: “Darling, 
sweet little girls don’t say things 
like that. That was rude.” 

You said, “I want to be like you, 
and you say ‘jerk.’ ” 

That slowed me down. “I really 
shouldn’t, though,” I explained. “I’ll 
have to cut it out.” From the tail of 
my eye, I caught an odd expression 
as it brushed across your face, fleet 
as a butterfly’s wing: I think you 
were laughing at me, Honey. 

Several days later, you were work¬ 
ing with me in the carpenter shop 
where I was fitting new wheels on 
your red wagon. One of the cotter 
pins snapped and, in a typical mo¬ 
ment of man’s exasperation with an 
inanimate object, I relieved my mind 
with a few hot statements under my 
breath. J 

You’re a sharp cookie, Judy, be¬ 
cause you understood the mood, even 
y° u didn’t hear all the words. 
Why Daddy, you mustn’t say things 
like that. It’s naughty,” you cor¬ 
rected. 

Several of my friends have as- 
suied me that rearing a child repre¬ 
sents a course in diction, manners, 
and ethics. Sweetie-pie, they weren't 
kidding. 

April 12, 1945 

Judith Ann, I’m proud of you. To¬ 
day, you learned two useful facts: 
Not to be afraid of a thing that has 
been explained to you with proper 
warning, and to pass on your knowl¬ 
edge to others. 

I’ve been making some improve¬ 
ments in your playhouse, installing 
casement windows, and inside 
screens. To simplify matters, I had 
brought my electric bandsaw into 
the playhouse. When you awakened 









from your nap, you came running 
down to “help” me, but you paused 
just outside the door. I turned around 
to grin at you, and found that pretty 
face gone sour as an old apple; you 
were about to howl. I switched off 
the motor and said to you, conversa¬ 
tionally, “It makes an awful noise, 
doesn’t it? But there’s nothing about 
it to hurt you as long as you keep 
your fingers away from the blade. 
This is the part that cuts off fingers. 
Just put your hands behind you, and 
watch, and you’re safe. The noise of 
this machine doesn’t mean anything.” 

Your face straightened and you 
stood quietly watching while I went 
on with my work. About this time 
McGinty, our female boxer pup, 
joined our group. After one look, she 
tucked her tail between her legs and 
backed off, ready to whimper. 

I flicked off the switch, and you, 
Miss Judith, said to your playmate, 
“You don’t need to be afraid. If you 
keep away from the blade, you won’t 
get hurted fingers.” 

I’d like to impress that principle 
upon you so that you would bring 
knowledge of it to bear upon every 
unfamiliar situation you encounter 
for the rest of your life: Find out 
what instrument you are dealing 
with, or what kind of a person; un¬ 
derstand the noise, find out what 
makes the thing or the person tick. 
Then avoid the harmful edge. There 
is, unfortunately, a harmful edge in 
almost everything because that is the 
nature of life, good and evil always 
set side by side. 

May 2, 1945 

Among the blessings of life, surely 
there are few equal to that of having 
an admiring daughter. You build up 
my ego, Judy. 

You have now reached that stage 
of development in which you hate to 
go to bed at night. In a fight, I’d like 
to have you on my side, because I’ve 
never seen such resourcefulness in 
avoiding capitulation; you can think 
of more things to delay that tuck-in 
moment! 

Last year, you would take your 
woolly lamb under one arm, and hop 
in without argument. This year, 
you’ve changed animals: You are 
sleeping with two wooden penguins, 
planned by their manufacturer to 
waddle down an angled board. I 
should think some more pliable toy 




Take Orders from Friends, Neighbors for Lovely 


nylon 
hosiery 


IN AMAZING NEW FIT SERVICE 


Yes —money of your own! Take orders 
for sensational new Yours-Truly Nylon 
Hosiery in amazing Individual Cus¬ 
tomer Fit Service ... a true fit pat¬ 


tern for every type of leg: slim, stout, 
average, short, long, extra long. Rush 
coupon for FREE Outfit including 
actual sample stocking! 


A Leg Pattern for 

Women are delighted when 
they see how they can have 
perfect flt In Yours-Truly 
Nylon Hosiery by ordering 
their Individual Leg Pattern. 
No twisted seams, baggy 
ankles, binding at topi They 
buy time after time when they 
discover how Yours-Truly 
Individual Customer Fit 
Service means perfect fitting, 
and therefore more beautiful 
hosiery. That’s why it's easy 
to earn money of your own 
taking orders. Housewives, 


EVERY Woman! 

mothers, Bchool teachers, etc. 
are blessing the day they 
mailed coupon for FREE 
OUTFIT. Be first in your 
townl Learn what it means 
to have money in the bank 
and cash in your purse for a 
few hours delightful, digni¬ 
fied, easy work. Spare time 
or full time. No experience 
necessary. Rush coupon NO W 
for gorgeous outfit and sam¬ 
ple stocking, sent to you ab¬ 
solutely FREE1 Enclose let¬ 
ter about yourself. 


AMERICAN 
HOSIERY MILLS 
Dept. R-209 
Indianapolis 7, Ind. 

Please RUSH my 
complete hosiery 

outfit with sample arocKtng. I understand 
this outfit is FREE to me. 1 enclose letter | 
about myself. 


Name. 


Address...Age . 


AMERICAN HOSIERY MILLS, Dept.R-209,Indianapolis 7, Ind. J.--- 


State. 


I 

i 



VtR DIRECT FROM FIFTH AVENUE, 


AUiiy ofi 1946 
THE SKIRT OF THE YEAR 

It has everything .. . Style . . . 
Fit... Fabric...Tailoring... for 
long fashionable wearability 

Dubbed "Missy of 1946", 
Craftrite's latest creation is the 
ultimate in style, fabric, 
tailoring and fit . . . and sure 
to set the vogue in skirt styles. 

100% ALL WOOL,* sized 9 to 
15, 22, 24, 26 and 28 .. . 
in a full range of colors: 
black, navy, gray, mint green, 
powder blue, gold, cocoa, 
red and American beauty 
.. . and only $4.98 each 
(plus mailing costs). 


► CKAFTR1TE SPORTSWEAR^,, b CHECK black novy gray mint green powder blue j 


545 FIFTH AVE., New York 17 
HUSH send me."Missy of 1946'* 

| Quantity 

THIS COUPON FOR ■ 

■ D money order or coshiers check enclosed 

QUICK DELIVERY ■ o mail, COD 


COLOR gold cocoa red omerican beauty 
Second color choice. 


Nome 

Address 


■ ■ ■ | TO SAV! tQt FU ond speed delivery send coshiers 

MOMFY AACIT It A check or money order adding 15c for moiling. City. 

* m Size. 9 11 13 15 22 24 26 28 

NOT SATISFIED ■ (circle sixes wonted) State 


Zone... . 


81 


































are the new streamlined pen 
and pencil sets that are literally flying 
over paper to make writing history. 


CHECK THESE FEATURES 

>/ 14 kt. Gold Iridium Tipped Point. 
y/ Automatic Leak-Proof Lock Section. 
y/ 14 kt. Gold Plated Sterling Silver Caps, 
Clips and Lever. 

y/ Unbreakable barrels in color. Your choice 
of Ebony Black, Burgundy, Navy and 
Battleship Grey. 

y/ Pencil propels, expels and repels—writing to 

the very end of the lead.without fussing. 

y/ Inner sections of the pencils are sturdily rein¬ 
forced with aluminum. 

write direct 


PEERLESS (Pj&vicLZi 

14 WEST 17TH STREET, NEW YORK 11. N. Y. DEPT. H 
^ Manufacturers for over a Quarter of o Century. A 







MATERNITY from 

DRESSES tmSka 



The newest in smart Maternity 
Dresses for home and street wear. 

Darling frocks for comfort and concealing lines. All at 
surp risi ngly low prices. A dress for every occasion. 

CDCCfrom HOLLYWOOD 

I H Wm L New catalog sent upon request in plain 
wrapper, free. Write today. 

JANNE OF HOLLYWOOD, Dept. 31, 5071 Hollywood 
Blvd., Hollywood, California. 



DON’T LET THOSE “DIFFICULT 
DAYS” COME BETWEEN YOU 

Maybe it was his fault — that quarrel. 
Maybe. But next time take care! Don’t 
let those Monthly Blues make you 
nervous and irritable! Instead — for 
nervous tension, periodic cramps and 
headache — help get usually grand re¬ 
lief with these improved Chi-Ches-Ters 
Pills! 50<* at your druggist. Today, get 
Chi-Ches-Ters Pills, and take only as 
directed. 

The Improved CHI-CHES-TERS PILLS 

For relief from “periodic functional 
distress” 

FREE —New illustrated booklet of inti¬ 
mate facts every woman should know. 
Mailed in plain wrapper. Write today! 
Chichester Chemical Company, Dept. Q, 
Philadelphia 46, Pennsylvania. 


would be a better bedfellow, but I’ll 
admit that I don’t always follow the 
reasoning of a lady just past two. 

But, back to the way in which you 
bolster my ego you are always willing 
to go to bed the instant the nurse 
suggests such a course, if I will agree 
to go upstairs and sing you to sleep. 
Honey, in days to come you are go¬ 
ing to discover that your dad has a 
good voice for cooling soup, or blow¬ 
ing on campfires to make them flame. 
Beyond those functions, John Charles 
Thomas need not quake at the name 
Donlevy. 

Yet, each time I finish a ditty, lusty 
and a bit dff-key, you beam at me 
and sigh, “Daddy sings so pretty.” 
Everyone has a secret ambition: 
Mine has always been to sing. And 
now, without proper equipment or 
training, I’ve become the world’s 
greatest baritone to an audience of 
one flaxen-haired, blue-eyed beauty. 

Incidentally, this is very tough on 
your mother, who has a singularly 
acute ear; she knows good music. 
Sometimes she finds it relaxing to 
talk a walk in the garden during our 
nightly concert, but I’ve got to hand 
it to her: She never criticizes my 
paternal lullabies. Your mother is a 
reasonable woman, my dear . . . with 
a remarkable sense of humor. 

May 8, 1945 

Darling, the war in Europe is over. 
Today was formally proclaimed V-E 
day. All day yesterday, while I was 
working at Paramount in “Our Hearts 
Were Growing Up,” we kept getting 
rumors and conflicting reports. The 
Associated Press announced the ces¬ 
sation of hostilities, then this an¬ 
nouncement was labeled premature. 

I suppose that, when you are busy 
studying High School History, you 
will be taught that, in 1945, we were 
living in the Age of Propaganda, 
during which it was thought to be 
more important to convey a piece of 
news at a psychological time, than 
simply to tell the truth to heart- 
bruised millions. The truth is a great 
force, my darling, and I hope that 
your generation will revere it, un¬ 
biased, uncolored, and unchanged 
for all people. 

June 17, 1945 

Last year I promised myself that 
this year you would learn to swim- 
however, there will be a slight delay 
in the fulfillment of that ambition. 
You’re afraid of water, my pretty pet. 

I have never believed in this business 



Brian Donlevy started acting career at U. S. 
Naval Academy. Above, with Mrs. D. 



—--- -; - --*-<***'- to « oiivi i lui HJ 

glamour, poise and self-assurance. If your Bust 
Line makes you self-conscious, try the new 
(special up and out) Peach Cupbra. Use it for 
a week. If you are not delighted, send every¬ 
thing back and your money will be refunded. 
Write now. SEND NO MONEY. Send onJv 
your name and address and size of your old 
brassiere. (State whether small, medium or 
heavy.) When you get your Peach Cupbra with 
direction booklet, pay postman $1.98 (plus few 
cents postage). (Plain wrapper.) If you wish 
to save postage, send Two Dollars now and we 
pay postage. Read your direction booklet and 
wear your Peach Cupbra for a week. If you are 
not absolutely delighted with your new lovelier 
figure, send it back. It is positively guaranteed 
to please you. Join the hundreds of women who 
enjoy a lovelier figure with Peach Cupbra. 
Please print name and address clearly. 

72 ri R t fh t 4 day « Pa J ty , Peach Co., Dept. 23-B 
72 5th Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 


SAVE as never before! 

Genuine..-!ine-flut 

DIAMONDS 


Not chips, bat genuine, 
fine-cut sparkling dia¬ 
monds poisedin superbly 
styled 14 kt. solid gold 
settings! At amazingly 
low prices made possible 
only by our wholesale 
diamond connections. 
Diamond rings for women and men, $24 to $700 
Diamond wedding rings, $16.75 to $72.50. 

Write today for FREE illustrated booklet 
BOND DIAMOND CO. Dept. HW 5 
562 Fifth Avenue, New York 19, N. Y. 


mOLlSAlt CIAMOND DCAURS SltlCl 1881 




properly licensed pharmacists. Never sold by mail or 
order houses. Consult your physician — purchase 
your pharmacy.**»S. M. Laboratories, Seattle i^VV 







































of tossing a non-swimmer into a pool 
and letting him sink or swim. Nor do 
I believe in urging you to do some¬ 
thing for which your psychic develop¬ 
ment has not yet equipped you. 

We drove to Malibu today and I 
got pretty excited on the way down, 
imagining what fun you and I were 
going to have, wave-hopping. But you 
stopped short on the sand a few inches 
from the last fluffy curl of a spent 
breaker, and shook your head. “No, 
Daddy,” you said. “Too wet. Too 
cold.” 

I thought that if I went in, you’d 
follow, but the strategy didn’t work. 
You let me dive and swim and charge 
in and out of the surf until I was 
tired, but you didn’t venture beyond 
the dry sand. 

Well, sweet, we won’t hurry this 
thing. We’ll wait until you’re curious 
about swimming in the ocean. I hope 
this happens before you discover how 
cute you’re going to be in a bathing 
suit—at sixteen! 

July 21, 1945 

What an imagination! If you keep 
on at the rate you’re going, Miss Don- 
levy, you’ll be the feminine Jules 
Verne of your generation. I don’t 
mean to suggest that you dream ’em 
up, Baby, but your reportorial sense 
is as X-ray as Superman’s eyes; you 
are able to report things happening 
in one place, that are likely happen¬ 
ing in another. 

Well, here it is, darling: While 
we were at Malibu, you made friends 
with a little boy who lived next door. 
I won’t say that you were the domi¬ 
nant member of the partnership, but 
I did notice that you seemed to de¬ 
cide what games were to be played, 
and who was to have the leading role. 
I understand that this is a feminine 
proclivity, but I won’t go into it as 
your mother might read it, and if she 
does, I don’t mean you, dear. No, 
dear, really. 

At any rate, when I came home 
from the studio today, having been 
away from Malibu for a week, I said 
to you, “And what did you do all 
afternoon, Judy?” 

Whereupon you told me all about 
your little boy friend. He came over 
with his nurse, you said, and the 
two of you went swimming in the 
pool. Then you had a tea party in the 
doll house, then he took you for a 
ride in the wagon. You went all the 
way down to the store and had ice 
cream. Then the little boy was sleepy, 
so he went home to take a nap. 

There is the narrative, set down ex¬ 
actly as you recounted it to me. And 
not a word of truth in it, I hasten 
to add. Not a word. The little boy is 
still in Malibu; you won’t venture 
near the swimming pool* and there 
isn’t an ice cream store within a 
crow’s-flight of here. 

Could be that my writing this 
diary is influencing you to test your 
narrative skill. Well, keep it up, 
darling; I hear there is gold in them 
thar skills. 

August 14, 1945 

I was up at the mine, closing it for 
the winter, when I heard that the 
Japs had capitulated. Afterward, the 
radio went wild with reports of riot¬ 
ing in San Francisco, of millions of 
people putting on a wild celebration. 
Every man, of course, expresses re¬ 
lief and gladness in a different way; 
a man breaking a show window may 
be quite as joyous and humbly glad 
in his heart as the man who hastens 
to church, but my vote is for the con¬ 
servative action. 



MAGNETIC ! 




Heart-tugging loveliness be¬ 
gins with your hair ... kept 
gloriously radiant... fra¬ 
grantly clean! Ogilvfe Sisters 
specialized hair-beauty aids 
will help you achieve flawless 
grooming and soft, lustrous, 
manageable hair. 



CREME-SET 

for quick-grooming 
hair lustre 
$1.25 plus tax 

FREE! Hair-Care Booklet 
write . . . 


&qiQvi£ 

♦ — HAIR P f 


At better d&p*t,, drug stores 
DEP T. H-2. OGILVIE SISTERS. 604 Fifth Ave., New York 19. N. Y. 


CHAPPED HANDS HEAL FASTER 

THIS MEDICATED WAY! 



Nurses discovered this quick relief 
for sore, chapped hands. Try it! 

• Nurses were among the first to 
discover how quickly Noxzema helps 
heal even badly chapped hands. 
That’s because Noxzema is not 
merely a soothing cream, but a 
greaseless, medicated formula. It 
not only brings quick, comforting 
relief from the burning soreness, but 
helps heal the little "cuts” and "cracks.” Try 
Noxzema today! See how quickly your hands look 
better —feel better, too. 100, 35tf, 50<t (plus tax) at 
all drug counters. 




NOXZEMA 


Medicated Skin Cream 

- 83 



















22 POUNDS 


New Friends and Interests 
Make New World for Her 

Helen Shariter never wanted to 
believe anything. She thought 
she was meant to be stout and 
unattractive. A friend told her 
how the Bonomo Culture Insti¬ 
tute Home Course helped her 
and persuaded Helen to send 
for it. These pictures show the 
amazing improvement in 5 short 
weeks. 

SUCCESS THROUGH BEAUTY 

Many girls say they don’t care AFTER 
how they look. Actually they do. 

Ask yourself! “What do / want 
more than anything in this 
world?” A normal girl will say, 

“I want to be attractive, popu¬ 
lar . . . successful!” 

You can, if you’ll try! Thousands have made a 
new life for themselves through the Modern 
Beauty Methods of the Bonomo Home Course. 
Mr. Bonomo, director, has had over 20 years’ ex¬ 
perience in Hollywood and New York helping stars 
of stage and screen to success through beauty. 


Before 

and 

after 


IN 5 WEEKS 


ft 


ididn't believe* it- 

UNTIL/ 


Says 


HELEN 


SHARITER 


New York 


Gty 


BEFORE 

LOSES 


NOT JUST A 
REDUCING COURSE 

With over 200 how-to-do-it 
photos you’ll learn simply and 
quickly . . . How to Make up 
Properly; the correct Hair-Do 
for you; How to Dress Better 
and save money; How to Move 
Gracefully; and many more 
valuable beauty hints. 

SEND NO MONEY 

Mr. Bonomo makes you this 
offer. "Send for this Course 
today—try it for ten days. If 
you don’t see a marked improve¬ 
ment in yourself ... If you 
don’t agree it’s worth more 
than courses costing 10 times as 
much—then return it and your 
money will be promptly refund¬ 
ed. Remember, I only ask you 
to try.’’ 

MAIL COUPON TODAY 



Complete 
Home Course 


JOE BONOMO 

world famous 
beauty authority 
and publisher of 
"Beautify Your 
Figure”, 
your guide to 
Grace, Beauty 
and Charm . . . 
at all newsstands. 


Joe Bonomo. Personal 

BONOMO CULTURE INSTITUTE, Dept. 322 
1841 Broadway, New York 23. N. Y. 

Send me in plain wrapper complete Bonomo Institute 
Home Course in Success through Beauty of Face and 
Form. I'll deposit with postman $2.95 plus postage. If not 
delighted, I may return Course in 10 days and my money 
will be refunded. 


. Please Print piaiiiiy 

Address .- 

City . 7np*> Sta fB . 

I—| Check here if you enclose $2.95 for delivery postpaid. 
_I (Canada and Foreign $3.50. Cash in advance) 


I know, Judy, that my own elation 
was considerably modified by the 
conviction of America’s prodigious 
responsibility in turning the power 
of the atomic bomb into peacetime 
usefulness. You darling, and all in 
your generation, have inherited a 
burden unequalled in the history of 
the world. When I think of you, 
fragile, wide-eyed, tender, as being 
one of those who must forge the fu¬ 
ture, I must admit that my heart 
quails. It’s my job to teach you to 
conceive ©f that future in the proper 
light; it’s my job to equip you with 
courage and understanding, and to 
help you to develop guts. Honey, will 
you be patient with your pop, while 
he does his very best to make you a 
fine citizen, a gentlewoman, and one 
hell of a right guy? 

September 11, 1945 
God bless you, sunflower top! Every 
time I begin to get a little too serious 
about you and me and your mommy 
and everything else in the world, you 
pull some mad stunt that restores me 
to the happy fact that you’re 2Vz- 
utterly feminine, and a delightful 
character. 

Your mother’s furrier came over 
this afternoon, bringing some beauti¬ 
ful garments from which I wanted to 
buy a gift for your mother. She had 
mentioned, last winter, that she 
would like to have a stole (whatever 
that is), so I asked this furrier friend 
of mine to call on me with sugges¬ 
tions. 

He slipped this stole around your 
shoulders and said, “Walk over to 
your daddy and ask him to buy this 
for you, there’s a sweet girl.” 

You strolled over, the ends of the 
stole dragging on the carpet, and I 
said, grinning, “Do you want me to 
buy that for you, darling?” 

You shook your head. “No, Daddy,” 
you said, “1 want a mink coat.” 

What I want to know, daughter 
dear, is this: Are you precocious, or 
an efficient eavesdropper? 

September 28, 1945 
When you and I were shopping in 
Beverly Hills today, I decided to buy 
you one of those teddy bear coats— 
’wallaby! I learned is the trade name. 

You were delighted. You gurgled 
and posed and looked generally beau¬ 
tiful. So we bought the coat and as 
we started to leave the store, I said, 
“All right, Honey, now you’ve got 
your mink.” 

You looked up at me in your best 
Debutante of the Flower Guild man¬ 
ner and said sweetly, “No, Daddy, 
this is wallaby.” 

What a woman! 

November 30, 1945 , 

Your mother and I have been hav¬ 
ing one of our heart-to-heart talks 
this evening. We’ve been down in the 
game room, about twenty feet from 
the spot we were occupying when 
she first told me that you were com¬ 
ing into our lives. This time we’ve 
been ya-ta-ta-ing about the fun of 
being parents. We’ve agreed that a 
child is the biggest responsibility in 
the world, but we’ve also agreed that 
there is nothing in life that gives such 
joy, such satisfaction, such a feeling 
of being at one with other human 
beings, and with the universe, as 
rearing a child. 

Always cherished in my heart, se¬ 
cret and vitally important, will re¬ 
main the fact that you have taught 
me that being a father is the most 
wonderful thing that can happen to 


a man. 



D ON’T try to force sleep. This often 
makes your nerves even more tense. 
Instead, try 

DR. MILES NERVINE 

(Effervescent Tablets or Liquid) 

Dr. Miles Nervine is a scientific combination 
of mild but effective sedatives which relaxes 
nervous tension to permit refreshing sleep. 
Get it now to have it handy when you want 
it. Buy it at your drug store on our money- 
back guarantee. Caution; read directions 
and use only as directed. Handy- to-carry Efferves¬ 
cent Tablets. 35c and 75c; Liquid, 25c and $1.00. 
Miles Laboratories, Inc., Elkhart, Indiana. 


NERVINE 


Be a Hotel Hostess 


Enjoy Your Work! Fascinating posi¬ 
tions in hotels as Hostess. Executive 
Housekeeper, Manager, etc. Grade 
school education plus Lewis Training 
qualifies you. One student writes: 
"Business Manager and Hostess in 
Fraternity House. Have attractive suite 
in addition to salary, thanks to Lewis 
Training." Write for Free Book. (30th year.) 

LEWIS HOTEL TRAINING SCHOOL 
9ta. HB-9301 Washington 7, D. C. 




in Designing 

mw* adc learning 


ARE LEARNING 
AT HOME—SPARE TIME 

Now. It’s possible for those 
with aptitude and talent to 
gain a thorough foundation 
training in Costume Design¬ 
ing in spare time, at home, 
whether it is for personal 
use or as a starting point 
for a commercial career. 


Fascinating Field 

It’s thrilling to be able to 
design for yourself and 
family, and it helps to save 
you money. And, after you 
have learned the fundamen¬ 
tal principles and gained ex¬ 
perience by practice, you 
may even consider opening 
a shop of your own some day. 


Experienced Teachers Train You 

The N. S. D. D. staff of teachers guide you step by step. 
Our ‘•leam-by-doing’’ method is most practical. While 
helpful, previous experience in dressmaking, sewing or 
fashion sketching is not necessary. Student s designing 
outfit included. Employment guidance. 

Mail Coupon 
for FREE Booklet 

Send coupon below for FREE 
booklet, "A Career in Costume 
Designing." Sent postage pre¬ 
paid, without obligation. 

NATIONAL SCHOOL OF 
DRESS DESIGN 

DEPT. 1862 

1315 S. MICHIGAN AVE. 

CHICAGO 5, ILL. 


National School of Dress Design 
1315 S. Michigan Ave., Dept. 1862, Chicago 5, III. 

Please send me FREE and postpaid your booklet. "A 
Career In Costume Designing.” and full particulars. 

Name. 

Address. 

Ctty. Zone.... State. 



84 


The End 


































HOUSE OF MORGAN 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 311 


the cowboy had pulled a roll of bills 
out of his pocket and shoved it into 
my hand. ‘I hope this will see you 
through, son,’ he said. He was strid¬ 
ing through the door before I re¬ 
covered my senses enough to go after 
him. And while I stood protesting 
that I couldn’t accept his money 
unless he took my I.O.U., he jumped 
on his horse (tied to a post in front of 
the lunch room), and rode off. Rode 
off waving his hand, without even 
telling me his name. 

“No one in the lunch room knew 
who he was. 

“There was seventy-five dollars in- 
that roll of bills; more than enough 
to buy a new tire and get us to Holly¬ 
wood. I’ve never forgotten what that 
cowboy did for me. But I’ll never be 
content until I’ve located him. I want 
to let him know what he did for me; 
I want to repay him. 

“The name of the desert town 
where we met is Almagardo, New 
Mexico—a place now known the 
world over, since it was chosen as the 
site of one of the atomic bomb plants. 
If this man reads this, I hope he’ll get 
in touch with me; I hope he’ll write 
to me, care of Warner Bros. Studio.” 

So Dennis Morgan went to Holly¬ 
wood. He went as a singer. But he 
was to work in four successive pic¬ 
tures, doing straight roles. A year 
without having sung a note on the 
screen, though he had been signed to 
do singing roles, and that’s what he 
wanted to do—a year, and then he 
rebelled. 

“I protested,” he says, “not realiz¬ 
ing how lucky I was to have had all 
that training. Finally, I caught on. 
I was persuaded that if I expected 
to get anywhere as an actor, I would 
have to get to work on my speaking 
voice. Vocalists, you see, often de¬ 
velop slightly higher speaking voices. 
That was true in my case. Long hours 
of reading aloud—that was the only 
way to overcome it. I decided to see 
what I could do.” 

So night after night, for four 
months, Mrs. Morgan listened to her 
husband read the evening paper from 
beginning to end—even to the adver¬ 
tisements. “Never since has either of 
us been so well-informed on the news 
of the day!” Dennis laughs. 

But persistence has its reward. To¬ 
day, Dennis has the reputation of hav¬ 
ing one of the best speaking voices 
on the screen. 

It was a little over a year ago that 
the Morgan family settled down on 
their four acres of rich farm land 
lying two thousand feet above the 
little town of La Canada, out Flint- 
ridge way. Just a few weeks later, 
their doctor advised Dennis to give 
up their home in the San Fernando 
Valley and move to a high altitude. 
Such a change was imperative, the 
doctor said, if their six-year-old 
Kristin was to overcome her sinus 
trouble. 

And where they live now? Really, 
the place looks more like a prosper¬ 
ous western ranch than a movie star’s 
home. A thriving vegetable garden, 
cared for by Dennis and Stanley (now 
11), replaces one of the large flower 
gardens. The lake, now known as the 
pond, is alive with ducks—both wild 
and domestic. The stables shelter a 
team of fine work horses, a cow and 



The Dennis Morgans, at Ciro's—which is 
unusual, for they so rarely go "clubbing." 


a goat. The aviary has been con¬ 
verted into a chicken house, with 
space set apart for a flock of peacocks 
and peahens. 

The guest house nearest the main 
dwelling has been turned into a play¬ 
house for the children, with a rumpus 
room for the grown-ups. There’s an¬ 
other house, too—facing the formal 
gardens—which makes a charming 
home for Lillian’s mother an sister. 
A third house, built on a gentle slope 
towards the rear of the property, is 
Dennis’ pride and joy. The basement, 
tunneling into the hill—used as a 
wine cellar by the former owner— 
makes a perfect cold room for Dennis 
to hang the wild game he brings back 
from his hunting trips. Dressed 
chickens and turkeys, raised on the 
place, are also hung here. The rooms 
above are used for a general store¬ 
house. 

The most attractive of all the guest 
houses—a small lodge, fifty feet from 
the swimming pool, with a wide fire¬ 
place and great skylight—is the only 
house used for the purpose for which 
it was built. It is here that Dennis 
puts up service men; friends he has 
made during his many camp tours. 

The pine trees which overran the 
property, in spots, are being thinned 
out. Dennis would not be worthy of 
being called the son of his Wisconsin 
lumberman father, if he hadn’t cut the 
trees down himself and sawed them 
up. “We have enough logs to keep 
our fireplaces going for. a year,” he 
says. And it’s true. 

The Morgans haven’t visited a 
nightclub—not once—since settling 
down in their new home; Dennis is 
seldom seen at the Lakeside Country 
Club, either—he used to spend a lot 
of time on the Lakeside golf course, 
when he lived in the valley. But now 
. . . they prefer to have friends come 
in to dinner; dinners Dennis himself 
cooks, in the barbecue. 

He’s a past master at broiling meats, 
you know. Although he often used 
the grill in the enormous open fire¬ 
place, his friends prefer the method 
he originated in the days when he had 
no deluxe barbecue. He takes a 50- 
gallon wine keg, with the top sawed 
off and hinged on so securely that it 



for FREE Samples 

Read this thrilling news! 
You don’t pay one penny 
ever, for your choice of gor- 
| geous new dress in your own 
favorite style, size and color. 
Select your dress from more 
than 100 newest Harford 
Frocks styles—and it’s 
yours just for sending orders 
for only 3 dresses for your 
friends, neighbors, or mem¬ 
bers of your family. That’s 
all! Not one cent to pay now 
any other time—every¬ 
thing supplied without cost! 

Experience Not Needed 
—Use Spare Time 

Imagine showing your friends 
and neighbors a vast complete 
selection of gorgeous, exquisitely- 
designed Harford Frocks—more 
than 100 styles, all sizes, and 
scores of beautiful fabrics in the season's latest colors 



and patterns—as well as hosiery, lingerie, sportswear, 
suits, coats, children’s wear, etc. Your friends and 
neighbors will be eager to give 
you their orders when they see 
the beauty of the styles, the 
huge selection, and learn the 
LOW MONEY-SAVING 
PRICES. And for sending or¬ 
ders, for only 3 dresses at the 
low regular prices, YOU CAN 
SELECT YOUR OWN DRESS^ 

TO BE SENT1TO YOU withouC 
■paying one cent for itl And this 
thrilling plan does not stop with 
only one dress! You can go right 
on getting dress after dress, until 
you have a complete wardrobe! 

Gorgeeus Style Presentations Sent FREE! 

Mail Coupon Below 

Yes—we send you gorgeous presen 
tation showing scores of latest 
fashions with actual sample fabrics 
In dresses, lingerie, children's wear.| 
sportswear, suits, coats, etc. Due to 
present conditions we may not be 
able to send your Style Presenta¬ 
tion at once—but rush coupon be¬ 
low now to place your name on our 
list and be among the first to receive 
the new Style Line when available. 

No money needed. Don't miss this 
opportunity to get complete ward¬ 
robe for yourself—with chance to 
earn up to $22.00 in a week cash, 
besides. Mall coupon now. 

HARFORD FROCKS, INC. 

Dept. A9004,Cincinnati 25, Ohio 

1 HARFORD FROCKS, INC. 

Dept. A980t,Cincinnati 25, Ohio 

I want to get a dress for myself 
for ordering 3 dresses for friends, or members of 
my family. Please rush me the new Harford I* rocks 
Style Presentation FREE as soon as possible. 

Name. 


Address... 

City. 

My Age is. 


. State 
















FORMULA 301 is distin¬ 
guished for emphasizing 
exquisite skin-gloiv high¬ 
lights and for its blemish- 
concealing effectiveness. 


FORMULA 301 

COMPLEXION BEAUTI FIER 

The lotion make-up base that 
creates flawless-looking complexions 

39c • $1.00 • $1.50 

At all Ten Cent Stores--Trial Sizes 10c and 20c 


KAY PREPARATIONS CO.. 522 5th Avenue. New York 18 

If unavailable in your locality, order from us. 
10c □ 20c □ 39c □ $1.00 □ $1.50 □ 

(Add 20% tax) ij 

Name . 

Address... 

City & State.?. 

THIS EASY WAY.aML 
TEACHES P/ANCM 

Mudic/ 1 


NO LONG HOURS 
PRACTICING SCALES 
OR EXERCISES... 

PLAY SONGS 
FIRST DAY 




You May Play Any Song 
in 10 Days without being 
Able to Read a Note .. . 

If you want to quickly learn how 
to play the piano . . . if you want 
to play song hits, waltzes. 
^ marches, hymns, two steps, red 
hot numbers and western songs, like 
“ Don’t Fence Mein”...here’s amazing 
news. Now at last Mr. Dave Minor 
has perfected a wonderfully easy 
play-by-car piano course that must 
teach you piano playing in only ten 
quick days or no cost. No scales, 
no long exercises. You Btart playing 
songs from the first lesson, and so 
soon it’s amazing you’re playing 
the piano surprisingly well. Mr. 
Minor’s course is complete. It con¬ 
tains all the pictures, all the in¬ 
struction, everything you need. 

' The complete course sent for your 
inspection, trial and approval. 

SEND NO MONEY 

Make This Conclusive 10 Day Test 

Just send your name and address today. 

On arrival deposit $1.49 plus postage 
through postman. There is nothing 
more to pay. Inspect course carefully, 
see how simple yet thorough it is. Follow 

it for 10 days. Then if you aren’t actu- 

ally playing the piano and playing it well, if you aren\ en¬ 
tirely satisfied and delighted with your discovery, return the 
course and get your money back. Piano playing is more 
^puTarthanfve/DON’T WAIT BUT WRITE TODAY 1 If 
you act now you will receive without extra cost the wonderful, 
big 72-page Dave Minor piano song book of 50 songs. You 
quickly learn to play the songs the Dave Mumt method or 

money back. Get in on this 2 FOR 1 offer NOW. 

DAVE MINOR, Room I B, 230 E.0hio St., Chicago 11, III. 



makes an airtight container. There s 
a heavy iron pan fitted into the bot¬ 
tom of the keg; he fills the pan with 
a bed of glowing coals—made of dried 
and burning apricot pits (for years, 
every Fall, Dennis has bought a lot of 
apricot pits from the drying kilns, 
just for this purpose). Just before 
placing the steaks on the grill over 
the coals, he splashes the inside of the 
keg with sherry wine. The lid is 
clamped down. And the subtle flavor 
of these thick steaks of beef, or veni¬ 
son, when they come out of the keg— 
really, it’s indescribable! _ 

The Morgans make it a point to be 
free, on cook’s night out. This is the 
night the children set the table for 
dinner and help prepare the food; the 
night their daddy and mommy eat 
with them. After dinner, they all 
make the rounds of the stables and 
the pond to make sure that the stock, 
the chickens, peacocks and ducks are 
safe and sound. Later, while Lillian 
tucks the children in bed, Dennis dons 
an apron and does the dishes. 

Every week day, Stanley and Kris- 
tan are driven down to the public 
school in La Canada. Registered 
under their real name—Morner—they 
are not pointed out as children of a 
motion picture star. 

Sunday morning, the entire family 
piles into the car and they drive down 
to the Presbyterian Church in Holly¬ 
wood, where the children go to Sun¬ 
day school. Dennis’ father and mother 
pick the children up afterward, and 
take them to their home in Beverly 
Hills. Dennis and his wife stay for 
church; Dennis sings in the choir. 

They all have dinner, then, with 
grandma and grandpa—and drive 
home in time for little Jimmie’s nap. 

Jimmy, by the way, is the image 
of his dad. He imitates him, too. He 
walks like Dennis, he gestures like 
him. Friends who come to the house 
love to see little Jimmie step out on 
one of the balconies and give the Riff 
call, just as his dad did in “The Desert 
Song.” 

No one over leaves the Morgan 
house empty-handed. A slab of de¬ 
licious Wisconsin cheese, or a jar of 
maple syrup—there’s always some¬ 
thing slipped into a departing guest’s 
hand. 

“Never before in my life have I 
been so contented and happy,” Dennis 
says. Well, do you wonder? Sure 
enough—he’s come a long way since 
that day when the cowboy came to 
his rescue, out on the New Mexico 
desert. 

The End 


Answer to puzzle on page 12 




SWOON BRACELET 

Plated in 24 Karat COLD with 
; V 6 PICTURE FRAMES contains 
12 beautiful, latest photos of 
SINATRA, CROSBY. COMO, HAYMES, 
RUSSELL & JOHNSON 

Here'it a charm bracelet that's out of this world. Wear 
your pin-up boys on your wrist. YOU’LL LOVE IT — you 
won't want to take it off. Genuine 24 karat gold plated 
bracelet , with 6 miniature frames. If you wish, you can 
replace swoon-singer photos with pictures of your 
sweetheart , husband, brother, mother t baby—anyone 
you love to look at all the time. 

Only $1.98 complele-Includes tax. 


FREE gorgeous picture frame 
earrings icith Van Johnson 
photos llj\ if you send 

$1.98 with order. 


1 REGENT JEWELRY CORP.. Dept. M-2 

|| 545 - 5th Ave.. New York 17, N.Y. 

I Please rush me.Swoon Charm Bracelets at $1.98, 

which already includes 20% Federal tax. 

| □ I will pay the postman $1.98 for each bracelet plus 
I COO and postage. 

• □ Check here if you ore sending $1.98, thus getting 
I bracelet and Free Van Johnson Earrings. 

| Name. —•••• ..... 

I Address.-. 


MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 



Get QUICK relief with Dent’a Tooth Gum or Dent’s 
Tooth Drops! "Cavity Toothache" frequently strikes 
at night. Be prepared. Buy either package from your 
druggist today. Keep it handy for children 
and adults. Follow easy directions. 


DENT'S 


TOOTH CUM 
TOOTH DROPS 


m m 




Tooth Comb 

You’ll say it’s"worth'its weight in gold. We ship C.O.D. 
at $1.25 each, on Satisfaction or Money-Back Guarantee. 
Colors: pink, blue, green, clear. Order today. 


YOU TOO CAN HAVE 
LOVELY HAIR 


THIS EASY WAY! 


WELL-KNOWN 
NEW YORK MODEL 


Carry 

Brush and Tail Comb Combination 
everywhere. Use Nylon bristles 
to freshen any hair-do instantly; 
rattail to whisk end curls into 

place. 

veercrry l)v 


bv PbillipN 


Angled Brittle Brush 
Patented 


SEND NO MONEY 


PHILLIPS BRUSH COMPANY, DEPT. HG-2 
118 E. St. Clair Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 

My dealer is out of stock. Please send.Beauty 

Brushes C.O.D. at $1.25 each plus postage, on Money 
Back Guarantee; or enclose payment and we pay postage. 
Same guarantee. 

name 3 pink D blue D green □ clear 

address.. . 

CITY. STATE. 
































































































































MUSIC TAKES A BOW 

lCONTINUED FROM PAGE 40) 


radio and screen thrush, Dinah Shore. 

The star of the picture will probably 
turn out to be “The Whale Who 
Wanted to Sing at the Met,” a Disney 
whimsy about a whale with three 
voices and a great ambition. Nelson 
Eddy sings for all three voices, as well 
as for the prima donna, and had the 
time of his life doing it. The result 
is a rich collection of operatic num¬ 
bers, and this one is for you, whether 
you love or loathe opera. - 

In lighter vein, musically speaking, 
this new Disney revue includes “Peter 
and the Wolf,” narrated by Sterling 
Holloway; “All the Cats Join In,” one 
for and about the swooner set, which 
features Benny Goodman’s tootling; 
Jerry Colonna in a musical version of 
“Casey at the Bat”; “After You’ve 
Gone” — an abstract representation 
(remember the Bach Toccata and 
Fugue in “Fantasia”?) of the song as 
interpreted by Cozy Cole and the rest 
of the Goodman Quartette; a hilarious 
number about a hill-billy feud called 
“The Martins and the Coys” sung by 
the King’s Men: and “Johnny Fedora 
and Alice Bluebonnet,” sung by the 
Andrews Sisters, which is the love 
story of two hats—and just get those 
eyebrows back down again! For this 
little number is poignant enough in 
spots to wring tears out of Boris 
Karloff. 

By the time “I’ve Always Loved 
You” and “Make Mine Music” reach 
the screen, many other class musicals 
will be in work or ready for release. 
Many are based on composers’ lives 
and will feature their music. To 
mention a few, Hal Wallis is prepar¬ 
ing a story based on the life of 
Tchaikowsky; George Waggner will do 
one at Universal on Beethoven and 
Franz Schubert, of which he says, “The 
life of Beethoven could not be done 
properly without Franz Schubert play¬ 
ing an important role, inasmuch as 
the former played a very important 
part in the advancement of the latter’s 
career; therefore, one film covers two 
great composers’ lives.” 

Walter Reisch (who wrote “The 
Great Waltz” and is himself an accom¬ 
plished musician) is writing the story 
for “Scheherazade” which is about 
Rimsky-Korsakov, though it is not a 
biography. The story is based upon 
an incident during his career as a 
midshipman in the Russian Navy, be¬ 
fore he ever took up the study of 
music. During a world cruise that was 
part of every midshipman’s training, 
the ship was anchored for a week at 
a heat-wave ridden town on the 
Mediterranean. 

“In point of fact,” says Mr. Reisch, 
“Rimsky-Korsakov mentions in his 
autobiography the fact that on this 
world cruise the inspiration for his 
now world-famous ballet-suite ‘Sche¬ 
herazade’ came to him. The picture 
itself will be based on these historical 
facts, and will attempt to capture 
within its running time of 100 min¬ 
utes all the beauty of Rimsky-Korsa- 
kov’s music. It is not a musical 
comedy, but a dramatic story in which 
the musical interludes play an integral 
part.” 

Later on, Mr. Reisch joins Boris 
Morros, who will produce independ¬ 
ently a picture on Beethoven called 
“My Immortal Beloved,” which takes 
(Continued on page 104) 





AMAZING BARGAINS 

IN NEW UNUSUAL 

STATIONERY 


OffFERENT,COMPLETE LIBERAL PACKAGES^: 




Now you can get SEVEN different kinds of wonderful, new 
attractively printed stationery and specialties—each for 
only 25o per liberal-size package! But that’s not all! With 
each order for any FOUR 25c packages you will receive, 
FREE of extra charge—a FIFTH 25c package of your own 
selection—giving you FIVE 25c packages for only $1.00! 
Or, with eight 25c packages you receive TWO FREE 25o 
packages! Order by number TODAY from Western Sta¬ 
tionery Company, Topeka, Kansas! Supply limited. Satis¬ 
faction guaranteed or money cheerfully refunded! 

. JpERSONU STATIONERY 2 5c 

Unbelievable, but HmF address pointed on 

color stationery 1 

^|TEEN*AGE STATIONER^^^ 

Teen-A^Statlonery “« Jr v CIeVer »‘te-A-Way 25C 


Q FIRST NAME STATIONERY 2 5 c 

Your own first name attractively printed In 
large handsome type face on 24 attractive assorted colored 
sheets. 12 matching envelopes. Many persona prefer this 
stationery to that printed with full name and address. Why 
choose? Select both! Only 25c per package! 



>35 CORRESPONDENCE CARDS 

Your name and address attrao- y K<» 
tlvely printed on 35 handsome corre- 
spondence cards, only 25c! Ideal for answering 
correspondence when in hurry, or with little to 
say. Perfect for answering ads. writing short 
notes, or writing stage, screen, radio stars. 

MY-OF-WEEK stationery 1 

stationery*;?SjSt?? att ™«lve Ok! 

1100 CALLING CARDsl 

Your own complete name 2wC 
beautifully printed on go^ Qt^Ry on 

cards. Everyone wanw theu- e O penaive Not 

S“?wS 5 i' aatttotfSr. toe camns cards * 

only 25c 1 


IMDHDTAIJTI Remember, with your 
I m r U K I A N I ! order for ANY FOUR 
25c packages you receive— FREE of extra 
charge—a FIFTH 25c package of your own 
selection. Or with eight 25c packages you 
receive TWO FREE 25c packages. Order 
TODAYI Supply limited. 


WESTERN STATIONERY CO, 








/ 


QUEST 

All-purpose DEODORANT 


On sanitary napkins. Quest powder deodorizes completely 


87 













SANDRA PREDICTS 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 441 





$0 0*i PLUS 

^ POSTAGE 

A vivacious and versatile twosome 
for your "Mix-’Em or Match-’Em” 
repertoire.. for business, sports, cam¬ 
pus, and all-occasion wear. Smartly 
tailored shirt and skirt, of suedelike 
flannel-finished Suami , the new mir¬ 
acle material. In Exotic Chartreuse, 
Exciting Melon, Rhapsody Blue, 
Butter-Nut Brown, Sizes 10 to 18. 

SEND NO MONEY—WE WILL MAIL C. 0. D. 

If not entirely satisfied, return 
at our cost for prompt refund 


Tin* 



conquered country by August, 

1945.” 

Sandra’s previously published pre¬ 
dictions for Hollywood, made during 
earlier sojourns here, were obtained 
by personal interviews with stars, but 
in this article she uses her new 
method of simple concentration on 
names given her. She has met none 
of these stars personally. 

Concentrating first on “HOLLY¬ 
WOOD,” Sandra foresees a new era 
for the motion picture industry be¬ 
ginning in 1946, but not completed for 
five years. The change will be gradual. 

There will be some fluctuation in 
production during the first quarter of 
1946, but from May onward produc¬ 
tion will show a steady financial in¬ 
crease. Demand at home and abroad 
will bring this to a high point before 
the close of the year. 

Two major studios, through new in¬ 
ventions which they will acquire, will 
branch out and combine to take over 
an interest in radio networks. 

The amalgamation of two other 
well known studios will surprise 
Hollywood. 

So much has been said and written 
about television that many of us have 
expected the end of hostilities to bring 
about use of this invention overnight. 
Sandra believes, however, that its gen¬ 
eral public reception will be slower 
than anticipated in the coming year. 
During the next five years, she thinks 
television will be perfected and ap¬ 
plied to all radio equipment. A yearly 
luxury tax, or some equitable form 
of payment, will make possible the 
showing of motion picture films in the 
home by television. 

Many a headache is in store for 
screen and radio actors as they try to 
adapt themselves to the new medium. 
Acting without scripts and with little 
time for memorizing lines may bring 
about as great a change in star and 
player lists as occurred in the transfer 
from silent to talking pictures. Sandra 
sees the revival of serial pictures dur¬ 
ing the gradual conversion to tele¬ 
vision. 

Disasters during 1946 foreseen by 
Sandra for Hollywood include: 

A fire at a studio or theater, or pos¬ 
sibly in a projection room, will spoil 
part of one and all of another good 
picture. 

Toward the middle of the year, a 
motion picture producer will be lost 
on a flight across the Atlantic Ocean. 

An automobile accident will cause 
painful injury to the leg of a certain 
well known actor, but he will recover 
completely before the end oi the year. 

A blonde star will break her arm. 
the accident causing a two months’ 
delay on the production of her cur- 
rent-at-the-time picture. 

A famous producer will retire from 
active duty due to ill-health. 

On the good side: 

Stolen jewelry belonging to a well 
known star will be recovered this 
year. 

Three writers will sign well paid 
contracts in connection with unusually 
fine scripts. One of these will be a 
woman. 

Concerning “discoveries of the 
year:” 

A young man of foreign nationality, 
new to the screen, will become a 
popular star after his second picture 



learned by average man or wo¬ 
man who is artistically inclined, 
in spare time at home. Easy-to- 
understand oil coloring method 
makes it possible to bring out 
natural, life • like colors . . 

Many earn while learning. ^ 


Thrills... Fun ... Earn ... 

comm photos 

ATHOME 


Easv to Learn ... ° ur practical 

^ w «• • • • instruction shows 

you how to do beautiful work. No previous train¬ 
ing is needed, nor is it necessary to do any 
drawing or sketching. Find out how those with nat¬ 
ural talent can be. trained to color their own photo¬ 
graphs and those of their friends and, when ex¬ 
perienced. seek work for studios, stores and others. 


National Method Means Beautiful Work 

Learn the *-National Method” of coloring photographs 
and miniatures in oil. It brings out beautiful effects. 
Originated in a well-known Studio that for many 
years catered to the Gold Coast residents of Chicago. 
This type of instruction trains you in the late, 
modern method of coloring in vogue today. 

FREE Booklet 

If you seek increased independence, 
greater happiness, and a worth-while 
hobby, and you feel you have artistic 
talent write for this FREE booklet. 
Find out more about this fascinating 
work and the opportunities in a com¬ 
paratively uncrowded field. Send today 
for free' booklet. “A Fascinating 
Hobbv” and full particulars. Sent post¬ 
age prepaid, without obligation. 
National Photo Coloring School 
Dept. 1862 

1315 s. Michigan Ave., Chicago 5, ill. 



NATIONAL PHOTO COLORING SCHOOL 

1315 S. Michigan Ave., Dept. 1862. Chicago 5. III. 

Please send me. without obligation, your FREE 
Booklet “A fascinating Hobby” and full particulars. 


Name. 

Address.. 
City. 


Zone. State.. 



FOR SICKNESS OR ACCIDENT 

Hospital Expenses paid, up to . . . 1540.00 

(beginning with the first day) 

FOR ACCIDENT 

Doctor Expense paid, up to ... $135.00 

Loss of Wages reimbursed up to . . $300.00 


Loss of Life by Accident.$1000.00 

WAR COVERAGE and EXTRA BENEFITS 

Childbirth Expense paid, up to . . $60.00 


Sickness or accident can easily wipe out, in a 
few weeks, savings it may have taken yeats to 
accumulate. Don't let this happen to you. With 
a Family Mutual Hospitalization Policy, you 11 
be able to pay yout hospital bills. In case of 
accident, you will be reimbursed for your doctor 
expenses and for loss of time from work. Your 
Family Mutual card admits you to any hospital 
in the United States and yout own family 
doctor may attend you. Benefits applying to 
children are 50% of those paid adults. 

MAIL COUPON TODAY—No Agent Will Bother You 


FAMILY MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., WILMINGTON 99, DEL 


Family Mutual Life Insurance Co. hw-ii 

601 Shipley St., Wilmington 99, Del. 

Please send me, without obligation, complete informa¬ 
tion on pour Economical Hospitalization Plan. 

NAME_ 

ADDRESS_ 

CITY_STATE ' 


88 



























HAIR 
Off 

WITH JOYOUS SPEED 

No More Worry 
About Ugly Hair 

Why worry about that ugly superfluous hair on face 
and lips? No one need ever know if you use Caress. This 
modern, scientific method has helped thousands of 
otherwise lovely women from Hollywood to Miami to 
new happiness and beauty. It is so unique and original 
that it has been granted a U. S. Patent. Just a twist of the 
wrist every few days and you need never see a super¬ 
fluous hair on your face again. No smelly liquid or 
possibly injurious wax or paste. No after stubble—will 
not irritate the skin or stimulate hair growth. 

Wonderful for arms and legs 

Hair off legs, arms, face in just a jiffy or double your 
money back. Send no money. Simply mail coupon below. 
Comes in plain wrapper. On arrival, pay postman $1.49 
plus postage for deluxe package. Pay no tax. If cash 
accompanies order, we pay postage. Rush coupon today. 


Scoff-Nelson Co v Box 109-E 

116 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago 3, III. 

Please send me a CARESS Home Treatment for 
superfluous hair. I'll pay postman $1.49 plus 
postage. If I am not satisfied after 7 days, I'll 
return it for refund of double my purchase price. 
(If you send cash we pay postage.) 

Name . 

Address . 


Oty . State . i 

L-4 




TA7HEN you have Headache. Simple 
V" Neuralgia, Functional Monthly Pains, 
or Muscular Aches and Pains, you want 
relief—the quicker you get it the better 
you are suited. Dr. Miles Anti-Pain Pills 
can give fast relief. They are pleasant 
to take and do not upset the stomach, 
A single tablet is usually all that is needed. At your 
drug store. Regular Package 25c, Economy Package 
$1.00. Caution; read directions and use only as di¬ 
rected. Miles Laboratories. Inc., Elkhart Indiana. 

VS» ANTI-PAIN PILLS 



BRUSH AWAY 

AND LOOK IO YEARS YOUNGER 


• Now. at home, you can quickly tint telltale gray to 
natural-appearing shades—from lightest blonde to dark¬ 
est black. Brownatone and a small brush does it—or your 
money back. Approved by thousands—Brownatone is 
guaranteed harmless when used as directed. No skin test 
needed. The principal coloring agent is a purely vege¬ 
table derivative with iron and copper salts added for fast 
action. Cannot affect waving of hair. Lasting-«—does not 
wash out. Just brush or comb it in. One application 
imparts desired color. Simply retouch, as new gray ap¬ 
pears. Easy to prove on a test lock of your hair. 60c 
and $1.65 at druggists. Get BROWNATONE now, or 


FREE TE5T BOTTLE 


The Kenton Pharmacal Co. 

265iBrownatone Bldg.. Covington. Kentucky _ 
•Without obligation, please send me, free and post- 
I paid Test Bottle ot BROWNATONE and interesting 
illustrated booklet. Check shade wanted: 

1 Q Blonde to Medium Brown Q Dark Brown to Black 

Name_ 

Address..-.. 

City...State..... 

_ . print Your Name and Address 


in this country. His first role will be 
a small one, but his unusual voice and 
natural dramatic gifts will gain im¬ 
mediate attention and popular de¬ 
mand will bring about his success. 

Not one, but four unknown ac¬ 
tresses will find 1946 the year of star¬ 
dom. One of the newcomers will be 
a dancer, one a singer, one an espe¬ 
cially delightful comedienne, and the 
fourth will be acclaimed as a dra¬ 
matic actress. 

Now, taking individual names from 
a list of Hollywood personalities, San¬ 
dra finds that— 

BETTE DAVIS will add to her 
laurels in 1946 with the magnificent 
portrayal of an extremely difficult 
character role. Her versatility will be 
further displayed in two other pic¬ 
tures that will give her vastly differ¬ 
ent opportunities. These may be pic¬ 
tures made or released during the 
year. 

Someone with the initial “S”, and a 
man who bears the initial “E”, will 
have some personal or business in¬ 
terest for her this year. 

Bette will go East in the late spring. 

During the year, she will make 
broadcasts and personal appearances 
in connection with aid to disabled 
veterans. 

In February and March, Bette 
should take good care of her health; 
if she does this, the rest of the year 
should hold no anxiety for her. 

Sandra finds VAN JOHNSON the 
most difficult person to foretell be¬ 
cause he is so extremely unselfish. He 
considers everyone else’s demands or 
wishes before his own. His natural 
charm, which endears him to those 
he meets, will last beyond the memory 
of his pictures. He is kind to young 
and old alike, and this is a gift with¬ 
out price. 

Van will not marry without care¬ 
ful consideration. He knows what he 
is looking for as a life companion. It 
is possible he will find his ideal in 
1946. 

He will have a heavy program of 
pictures this year. A film- released 
early in 1946 will be in great demand 
abroad as well as at home. Two pic¬ 
tures released in the latter part of the 
year will give him even greater suc¬ 
cess than he had with those made in 
1945. 

In connection with a picture that 
contains water scenes, Sandra warns 
Van to be careful not to submerge 
his head. In such an event, she be¬ 
lieves his nose and ears could be irri¬ 
tated and affected for a time. 

Carefully made investments in 1946 
will repay Van well in 1948. 

After 1946 and through the follow¬ 
ing four years, Van will receive higher 
remuneration, and he will work in 
fewer pictures. Two new hobbies will 
develop for him this year: one con¬ 
cerns the outdoors, the other seems 
to be a collection of small objects 
about which he will eventually write 
a story with historical background. 

INGRID BERGMAN will receive 
unprecedented recognition for one pic¬ 
ture this "year. The role seems to be 
that of a foreigner. There may be 
difficulty in connection with the adap¬ 
tation of a story scheduled for produc¬ 
tion early in the year, and although 
the delay is not long, it can interfere 
with a hoped-for vacation. 

Unexpected happenings in her 
career and private life could cause a 
temperamental storm, but Ingrid’s 
superb control over her emotions pro¬ 
tects her against all such incidents. 

Dr. Peter Lindstrom, Ingrid’s hus- 



CHRISTY PHOTO SUPPLY CO., Depl. 624 
2835 N. Central Ave., Chicago 34, III. 

□ Enclosed find $1.00. Send me complete 
outfit at once. 

□ Ship at once C.O.D. ($1.21) complete outfit. 

Name _ 


Address_ 


Sirttfiie 

EASY 
TO USE 

Magic liquid takes only 
2 minutes for you to re¬ 
produce any snapshot 
you have on to your sta¬ 
tionery, handkerchiefs, 
ties, scarfs, purses, etc. 
Use same picture over 
and over again if you 
wish. Won’t wash off. 
Doesn’t hurt either the 
photo or the fabric it’s 
used on. Wear your own, 
sweetheart’s, husband’s 
or son’s picture on your 
belongings. Personalize 
gifts that you give by 
adding the pictures of 
loved ones. Complete 
outfit—everything you 
need for transferring 100 
photos—ONLY $1 post¬ 
paid on cash orders. 
C.O.D. orders—total 
cost—$1.21. 


89 


































with ruffled yoke for flattering fullness. White 
rayon with buttons down the back... red “loop" 
trim. Sizes 32 to 38. 

Berry co-ev or Hollywood 

Dept. 391, 6253 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 


SEND NO MONEY —WE MAIL C.O.D. 


, BETTY CO-ED OF HOLLYWOOD, Dept. 391 
J 62.53 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 

| Please send me "Love Letters" Blouse at $3.98 
| plus postage. 

I (WHITE ONLY) 

I Sizes 32, 34, 36, 38 (Circle size wanted) 



















Thrill Your Friends With Your 
PERSONAL 


STAMPS 

in your letters, 
greeting cards, etc. 


Made from Your 
Favorite PHOTO or SNAPSHOT 

A thrilling, new idea in personalization that has 
taken the country by storm. Your favorite photo 
reproduced on stamps—ready to paste on your 
letters, greeting cards, etc. Just imagine the thrill 
your friends and loved ones will get seeing YOU 
in every one of your letters. 



Use PHOTO 
STAMPS on— 
Stationery 
Greeting Cards 
Gift Cards 
Announcements 
Sheet Music 
Applications 
Match Books 
. • 

As Bookplates 

• 

In Photo Albums 
Autograph Books 

• 

Exchange them 
With Pen Pals 


Many Other Clever Uses 

PHOTO STAMPS have many other use* 
for personalization and identification. 
Large sized I Vi”) and printed on 

high gloss gummed stock—simply moisten 
the back and apply. Individually cut with 
smooth edge. Adheres smoothly and evenly 
to any surface, giving the appearance of 
having actually been printed on. 

SEND NO MONEY 

Yes, for only $1.69, you can have 250'per- 
sonal PHOTO STAMPS (minimum quan- 
tity). Send no money—just send photo (no 
negatives. When stamps arrive, pay post¬ 
man $1.69 plus C.O.D. postage. If cash 
accompanies order, we ship postpaid. 
Original photo returned irytact. 

Money-Back Guarantee 




The PHOTOPLATE Co., Dept. EDO 

161 W. Harrison St. Chicago 5, III, 


band, will have two unusual business 
contacts which will delight them both. 

This year Pia, Ingrid’s little daugh¬ 
ter, will show signs of budding talent, 
but it will not be fully recognized 
until the child is sixteen. 

All footwear for home and studio 
should be carefully chosen this year, 
as otherwise there may be some slight 
irritation to one foot. 

Old friends the star has not seen for 
years will visit California during 1946. 
A relative from abroad will arrive un¬ 
expectedly and have many things to 
tell Ingrid, some interesting items 
making her extremely happy. 

JEAN ARTHUR’S best picture will 
be released during the latter half of 
the year. A new hair arrangement 
will change her appearance in one 
film. 

Travel and new-found influential 
friends will add to both her pleasure 

pnd QllPf'PQ9 

1946 will bring SHIRLEY TEMPLE 
new and exciting changes. One may 
concern the buying or building of a 
new house. 

Happiness continues to be the 
prominent theme of her symphony of 
home life and career. She will co-star 
in a picture, but the most outstanding 
event of the year is connected with 
a family life story. 

GREGORY PECK must be warned 
against overwork in 1946. Demand for 
his services reaches a peak that can 
reduce his physical resistance, unless 
he takes enforced rest for short 
periods. 

A film whose cast includes two older 
male stars should be an outstanding 
vehicle for Gregory this year. 

His young son will have some diffi¬ 
culty with a tooth and the family will 
become aware of his exceptional lung 
expansion at the time. The Pecks 
should be careful with the youngster 
while around water, as he will have a 
natural attraction for it. 

Excellent financial returns will 
mark the year’s pictures and will 
influence Gregory’s career in 1947. 

LAUREN BACALL should not 
worry over rearranged studio plans 
for her. The result is good. Surpris¬ 
ingly excellent public reception of a 
picture released in the first half of the 
year foreshadows a successful end to 
1946. 

A word of caution, Lauren—take 
care during the rainy season how you 
park your car on an incline. The car 
could take a joy ride alone and cause 
some damage. 

MARGARET O’BRIEN’S success 
continues but does not spoil her. 
Music, school work and outdoor sports 
absorb her while off the studio sets. 

The dentist looms as her greatest 
hazard. He is very gentle and no one 
but Margaret knows the palpitations 
he causes her. 

She will have two new admirers 
this year: an athletic young man_with 
blue eyes and blonde hair, a year or 
two her senior; and a very polite and 
handsome dark-haired boy about her 
own age, who likes to draw pictures. 
The rivals need not quarrel over her, 
as Margaret will like them equally 
well and will be unselfish enough to 
share them with her girl friends. 

Hems will be let down in her ward¬ 
robe; she will grow an inch in 1946. 

The picture she will enjoy most 
should go into production the first of 
the year, but another film will be the 
public’s choice. 

A personal problem will cause 
DIANA LYNN some annoyance for a 



Man's Watch Only JIMS —Ladies’ Watch Only JIMS 

Beautifully styled watches of superb quality. New and 
handsome. Made by Swiss craftsmen, leaders in fine 
watch making. Attractive, adjustable Genuine Leather band. 
Easy-to-read dial. Precision built. Stainless Steel Back. 
You’ll be delighted! Attractive Gift Box. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Back 

SEND NO MONEY. Write today. Tell us whether you want 
the men’s sturdy, dependat ’ e wrist watch, or the ladies’ dainty, 
exquisite wrist watch, .'imply pay postman C.O.D. plus 
postage and 10% Federal Tax. Limited Quantity. Get yours 
Quick. Written Guarantee With Every Order. 


International Diamond Co., 2251 Calumcl Ate., Depl.P12, Chicago 16. Ill 


rtlt yjALl/V 

■ 

’,tiuna 

a 

in PhO*j 

£ 

EE 

Prepar 

3 

e nc 

jEJ 

>w for a 


well-paid position today and a 
career that is sound and substantial as 
well as different, fascinating and profitable. 
Photography offers ever-increasing oppor¬ 
tunities for both men and women. FREE 
book tells how N.Y.I. experts can quickly 
train you at home or thru resident, day or 
evening instruction in our up-to-the-minute 
N. Y. studios. Start now, ALL branches of 
black and white, motion picture and COLOR 
photography. Write TODAY! 

NEW YORK INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY 
Dept. 94, 10 West 33 Street. New York 1. N, Y. 


EVERYBODY NEEDS 

^^rt^friers 

For mounting photos, cards, clippings, 
stamps, etc., in albums, where they can 
be enjoyed for years to come. Variety 
of styles gives artistic effects. New 
POC KETS are especially neat and versa¬ 
tile. Ask your dealer for genuine Engel 
Art Corners—or send 30c for 3 * 

packages & interesting samples. 



ingel Art Corners Mfg. Co. 

Dept. 45-P, 4709 N. Clark St., Chicago 40 



If you want Beautiful Look¬ 
ing Hair lose no time in 
keeping your Hair in Good 
Condition. Madam Jones 

HAIR GLORY helps tosoften 
and smooth Dry, Short and Brittle 
Hair during application. Adds 
new lively appearance and gloss 
to faded, dead looking hair. Before 
you know it you should be able to 
dress you hair in attractive 
fashion which should win the 
admiration of friends and loved 
ones. Remember, your hair is 
your crowning glory. So make 
yourself happy enjoying beau¬ 
tiful looking hair. 

Don’t let bad-looking hair hold 
you back any longer. Just send 
name and address for Madam Jones FREE Hair 
Treatment advice and learn how easy it is to have 
beautiful looking hair with Madam Jones HAIR 
GLORY during application. Hurry! Write today! 
MADAM JONES COMPANY, Dept. G-704 
2240 Cottage Grove Avenue, Chicago 16, III. 


FOR 

MEN 

and 

WOMEN 


FREE! 
































few weeks, but this will be brought 
to a satisfactory conclusion. 

Location problems may delay the 
first shooting of a picture. A clause 
added to a contract will be a pleasant 
surprise, bringing an addition to a 
previous financial agreement. Shelv¬ 
ing of one scheduled film will give 
opportunity for a far better one. 

This is a good year for Diana; a 
year filled with surprises. Among 
these, sudden news from the east will 
send her on an unexpected flight to 
New York. 

This year ROBERT STACK will 
play four completely different char¬ 
acter parts. One, played opposite a 
difficult feminine star, will gain him 
considerable praise. 

Take care, Robert, when making 
high jumps either for a picture or in 
a private demonstration of sports, for 
a strained ligament may result. Ex¬ 
ercise, be moderate in eating and 
drinking during the summer of 1946 
for the good of your health. 

You have the opportunity to spend 
a good deal of money this year, and 
discretion is advised. 

A radio program is possible in the 
latter months of the year. 

JOHN GARFIELD should have no 
complaint about casting this year. It 
looks better than good. If he can leave 
Hollywood, he may accept an offer to 
make a picture abroad. He may also 
do a radio program. 

For a time, BOB WALKER may 
suffer in silence on an inactive list 
while producers engage in arguments 
about him, but he will be pleased with 
the final result. 

Because a feminine lead must finish 
a picture, DANE CLARK’S first 1946 
film may be delayed. This change of 
schedule may give him an unexpected 
vacation. His career continues promis¬ 
ing, with September the peak month. 

DANA ANDREWS will have some 
difficult picture assignments and his 
popularity will double in 1946. 

There are some child-psvchology 
problems for him to solve concerning 
behavior, school reports, vacations, 
etc., but the effort is good for him and 
he finds his methods successful. 

A baby girl in the Andrews’ home 
in 1947 seems foreshadowed. 

Those returned heroes, JIMMY 
STEWART AND TYRONE POWER, 
will continue their screen careers 
with marked success. 

The number “9” should play a part 
in Tyrone’s life in 1946; the figure 
could stand for a date, nine weeks or 
nine people, but it has some splendid 
significance for him. A trip abroad 
will be discussed, and if work pre¬ 
vents its fulfillment in 1946, spring 
of 1947 would be the best time to 
take the trip. 

Jimmy Stewart may not care for 
some stories suggested for him, but 
whether or not he likes his films, his 
feminine fans find a new inflection in 
his voice and make a terrific fuss 
about it. It is Jimmy who suggests 
an idea that produces a song hit. 

He will be pursued by romantic 
girls and will have such a surfeit of 
social invitations that he will find his 
personal life disrupted. Whenever he 
appears in public with a girl, rumors 
of his engagement to her will em¬ 
barrass him. Jimmy will meet two 
new girls this year who may interest 
him, but the bright glare of publicity 
on his slightest action will make their 
better acquaintance difficult. 

If Jimmy marries, it will not be 
until the latter part of the year. 

The End 



can i/!(Ut CHOOSE 

Lovely 

GLAMOR GOWNS? 


OR MUST YOU CHOOSE 
DRESSES TO CONCEAL 




SORIASIS 


Women who cannot wear revealing gowns because of psoriasis lesions might find 
SIROIL a satisfactory answer to their difficulties. Then try SIROIL. It may solve this 
problem for you. SIROIL tends to remove the crusts and scales of psoriasis which 
are external in character and located on the outer layer of the skin. If or when your 
psoriasis lesions recur, light applications of SIROIL will help keep them under con¬ 
trol. Applied externally, SIROIL does not stain clothing or bed linens, nor does it 
interfere in any way with your daily rou¬ 
tine. Try it. Certainly it’s worth a trial, par¬ 
ticularly since it’s offered to you on a two- 
weeks’-satisfaction-or-money-refunded basis. 


■ Siroil laboratories, Inc., Dept. H-14, Detroit 26, Mich. 

| Siroil of Canada, Ltd., Box 488, Windsor, Ont. 


SIROIL 


I 


Please send me your free booklet on Psoriasis. 


FOR SALE AT ALL I name .— 
DRUG STORES | address_ 


Write today for interesting booklet on Psoriasis, using coupon — 


city_ 


ZONE 


STATE 



THE IDEAL GIFT 

FOR MOTHER, BRIDE, 
, OR BRIDE-TO-BE_^ 


ANTI-TARNISH 
k LEATHERETTE; 
\ CHEST / 


A Post-War Triumph! Silverware To Make 
^Your Heart Tingle and Your Table Sparkle! 


SILVER PLATE 


24-PIECE 
Service-For-Six 


Choice £ 
of 3 

Patterns 


95 

Post ?u4 
Tix Free 


A Silver Service to Treasure! 

ppy days are here again! And Silver Wedding Silver Plate is proud to lead 
way back to gracious peace time living for American brides of every genera- 
a. Designed to aerve from Bridal Breakfast to Silver Anniversary, Silver 
>dding Silver Plate has been fashioned in three exquiaite patterns by silver- 
i,h» who are artists as well as craftsmen— artists who have wrought for you, at ^ 
uthably low cost, silverware of traditional elegance and unmistakable aria- j 
racy. Yes, no matter which pattern you choose you’ll be proud of you* 
ver Wedding Silver Plate . . . proud of the admiration it wins you . . . proudet 
I to give a set of Silver Wedding to a loved one. So it is with pardonable 
de that we present Silver Wedding Silver Plate to you as a truly formal 
'erware set at a price below your fondest expectations, richly nested in a dis- 
guished anti-tamish leatherette chest well worthy of your post-war dollar*— 
i your lasting affections. 

No Strings Attached to Our 
"EXAMINE HI OUR DISK" GUARANTEE OF SATISFACTION 

t want you to save this advertisement until you receive the Silver Wedding 
ver Plate Set in the pattern of your choice. Then, if it isn’t every bit a: 

•ely and desirable as we say it is—if you are not positively delighted with its 
suty—if you are not thrilled with its value—return it within 5 days and we 


SERVICE FOR SIX INCLUDES 
* SIX TEMPOOM * SIX SOUP SPOOK * SIX HIVES * SIX FORXS 

All pints art btmrlHitllr bcianstd and bnltts havt nainltts ilttl kladts 




SILVER-PLATED SALT and PEPPER SHAKERS f 



NATIONAL NOVELTIES—Dept. SW23 
608 So. Dearborn St.—Chicago 5, III. 

Pl„,e rush lhe Silver Wedding Silverware Set checked off below complete with 
Antj-Tarmsh Chesi and Pair of Silver Plated Salt and Pepper Shaker*. My money 
will be refunded if returned within 5 daya. 


off choice of pattern Q Bliat □ My Love □ Amour 2nd Choice- 

CHECK ONE 

SERVICE FOR 4 $14.91 JJ.fC. SERVIC* FOR R 9 

COD. I -ill R*y portman #14.95 □ Send C.O.O. I w.D pay pootatan #19-50 

porta* char,#. 0°”*** 

. eiwlnwng #14.95. S«id my Srt □ »^ 


Address- 



f 


J 


91 




































You’ll love this beautiful Tableware Set of exquisite grace 
and design. Life-long quality, and sparkling beauty. A luxurious 
treasure you’ll enioy for years to come. You11 be proud to 
have this lovely Set grace your tables—proud to have your 
friends see this beautifully matched, perfectly balanced. 
Tableware Set. Consists of 6 beautifully designed knives. 
6 forks, 12 teaspoons. 6 soup spoons. 


GIVEN 


Beautiful 30-Piece Tableware Chest and 
F. a Rogers Silver Polishing Cloth 
with Every Order 


SEND NO MONET—10 Day Trial ia Ton Own Homn 

Yes! we mean it. Examine the set for 10 full days. Upon 
arrival, pay postman only $9.95 plus postage. Order now 
before we are aU sold out. You’ll be delighted! 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR MONEY BACK/ 
Great American Sales Co., 2226 Silverton Way, Dept. 530,Chicago 16 III* 


MANY NEVER 
SUSPECT CAUSE 
OF BACKACHES 

This Old Treatment Often 
Brings Happy Relief 

Many sufferers relieve nagging backache quickly, 
once they discover that the real cause of their trouble 
may be tired kidneys. 

The kidneys are Nature’s chief way of taking the 
excess acids and waste out of the blood. They help 
most people pass about 3 pints a day. 

When disorder of kidney function permits poison¬ 
ous matter to remain in your blood, it may cause nag¬ 
ging backache, rheumatic pains, leg pains, loss of pep 
and energy, getting up nights, swelling, puffiness 
under the eyes, headaches and dizziness. Frequent or 
scanty passages with smarting and burning some¬ 
times shows there is something wrong with your 
kidneys or bladder. 

Don’t wait! Ask your druggist for Doan’s Puls, 
a stimulant diuretic, used successfully by millions 
for over 40 years. Doan’s give happy relief and will 
help the 16 miles of kidney tubes flush out poison¬ 
ous waste from your blood. Get Doan’s Pills. 


JOAN LESLIE 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 461 


and Joan was taken off salary (along 
with other Warner contract players) 
she refused to quit practicing. 

“Look,” she pointed out, “if the 
strike ends suddenly and the studio 
starts production on this picture, I’m 
the one who’ll suffer. If my dancing 
isn’t up to Miller calibre, nobody’s 
going to blame the labor situation or 
Jack Warner—they’re going to criti¬ 
cize me.” 

Consequently she rented a dance 
rehearsal hall in Hollywood and 
worked out four hours a day, includ¬ 
ing Sundays, with the inexhaustible 
Eson. Three days after her rigorous 
training began, Joan’s toenails revolt¬ 
ed and began in-growing. Painful 
though this revolt was, she continued 
her plies, her pirouettes, and her fou- 
ettes, without complaint. She spent 
her spare time oiling her nails, wad¬ 
ding lamb’s wool under the corners, 
and jamming her feet back into her 
toe shoes. 

An incident typical of her wonder¬ 
ful determination to get things done— 
and done right—happened the day 
we watched her work out. Buddy was 
banging on the piano and Joan, on 
point, was leaping gazelle-like about 
the room. 

“One and two and — Cabriole, cabri¬ 
ole, tour j’ete, tour j’ete, cabriole — 
now do it back on the other side and 
watch your turn-out,” Buddy shrieked 
above the tinny piano. 

Joan, unlike her interviewer, under¬ 
stood the cabalistic yelps and ended 
the combination with a gold line ara¬ 
besque. Then she promptly collapsed 
into a chair. 

She undid miles of pink satin rib¬ 
bons, yanked off her slippers, removed 
a wad of lamb’s wool, and surveyed 
her toes drearily. 

“They still hurt,” she observed, 
“they still hurt.” 

But she put on a pair of well-used, 
soft-soled dancing slippers and went 
back to another two hours of work¬ 
out. 



BIRTHSTONE BRACELET $1.95. BIRTHSTONE EARRINGS 98c 

The radiance and beauty of this new style, lovely, bracelet 
will delight you. Completely set all around with large 
sparkling, faceted stones in delicately crafted links. Beautiful 
Gold color finish. You’ll love this smart bracelet. Artistically 
designed with YOUR OWN gorgeous simulated Birthstones. 
Give birth month. A precious possession you 11 value for 
years. Adorable matching Earrings lend glamour to your ears. 

SEND NO MONEY—Wear on 10 Day Trial 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Back. Pay postman 
C.O.D. on arrival, plus postage and tax. SPECIAL PRICE: 
Both Bracelet ana Earrings only $2.79. iou 11 be delighted. 

International Diamond Co.,2251 Calumet Ate., Dept. P13, Chicago 16,111. 


LESLIE AT PLAY: “My idea of a 
perfectly heavenly evening,” Joan 
says, “is to see as many movies as pos¬ 
sible. The other night Mother and I 
went to see “Kiss And Tell.” We got 
out early, hopped a street car and 
went to see “Love Letters.” Then we 
trolleyed back and met Dad right on 
time. It was wonderful!” 

She admits to getting a little miffed 
at the screen ladies who (as she says) 
act rings around her, but she thinks 
the smartest and truest slogan she 
ever heard was “motion pictures are 
your greatest entertainment.” They’re 
hers. 

And then there’s dancing. Hours of 
the ballroom variety send her into 
ecstasies. And there’s tennis. And res¬ 
taurants that simply reek of atmos¬ 
phere. She loves them all. 

But people are her hobby. Some¬ 
times she’ll grab a street car or bus, 
going nowhere in particular, just so 
she can scrutinize the passengers. She 
says, “It’s fascinating to watch people. 
Their reactions, their mannerisms, 
their nervous habits—all of them are 
wonderful studies for characteriza¬ 
tion. Jimmy Cagney impressed that on 
me while we were doing “Yankee 
Doodle Dandy.” He pointed out some 
unconscious business the wardrobe 


/^/Nadinola's 4 way action he/pyou 
C £XT£FNAUy CAUSED PIMPLES 

toos&v BLACKHEADS 
SvDULL,DARK SKIN 

Don’t give in to unlovely skin! Try famous 
BE] Nadinola Cream, used and praised by thou- 
^ sands of lovely women. Nadinola is a 4-way 

1 » ' treatment cream that helps to lighten and 

brighten dark, dull skin—clear up externally 
> caused pimples—fade freckles—loosen and 
remove blackheads. Its special medicated 
• ingredients help to clear and freshen your 
\ skin—to make it feel softer, look smoother. 
? Buy Nadinola Cream today and use as di- 
_ rected. A single treatment-size jar is posi- 
; tively guaranteed to improve your complexion 
or your money back! Only 55c at drug and 
toilet counters; trial size 10c. Also— 

. rTTTT^Tr«TT7»nTTnTTTnTrT!nnn » 

. NADINOLA, Dept. 70. Paris Tennessee • 

Send me free and postpaid your new deluxe edi- m 

• tion Beauty Booklet, richly printed in full color. • 

• with actual photographs and sworn proof of the • 

• wonderful results from just one jar of Nadinola. • 

• Name. * 

• Address. ^ 

, City.State. . 



avoid embarrassment of unwanted hair. Painless, 
easy, effective, inexpensive . . . without shaving, 
pulling or harsh chemicals. Gives a smooth, dainty 
appearance. It was developed by a young woman 
cursed for years by ugly unwanted hair. It worked 
charmingly. Her poise, love and happiness returned. 
She has helped thousands who voice everlasting 
gratitude. Now, no one need know you have a 
superfluous hair problem. 

FREE.««Send No Money 

Accept FREE WONDER METHOD booklet 44 How to Meet 
the Superfluous Hair Problem.” Gives complete fact9 
and proof of results. Sent with TRIAL OFFER in plain en¬ 
velope. No obligation. Write ANNETTE LANZETTE, Box 

4040, Merchandise Mart, Dept. 310. Chicago 54, III. 



e a Afawe 

MAKE $25-$35 A WEEK 

Practical nurses are needed in every 
community . .. doctors rely on them ... 
patients appreciate their cheerful, ex¬ 
pert care. You can learn practical 
nursing at home in spare time. Course 
endorsed by physicians. 47th yr. Earn 
while learning. High School not re¬ 
quired. Men, women, 18 to 60. Trial plan. Write now! 
CHICAGO SCHOOL OF NURSING 
Dept. 452. 100 East Ohio Street, Chicago II, III. 
Please send free booklet and 16 sample lesson pages. 

A’a m e - 

City _ State _ Aye _ 






JV/IH SPAR* 


SELL EVERYDAY GREETING CARDS 

New 19i6 Assortments Now Ready! It’s easy to 
Make Extra Money. Just show assortments of 
Everyday Greeting Folders for Birthdays, Anni¬ 
versaries, Get-Well, Sympathy. Amazing Values 
bring quick sales. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. 


You Make up to 50c per Box 

Call on friends, others. Every 
$1 sale brings you up to 50c prof¬ 
it. Start earning big money year 
’round. Send 66c for Sample Every¬ 
day Box. Money back if not satisfied. 


CHILTON greetings co. 

UfllLIUn 147 ESSEX STREET 
Dept. 100-R, BOSTON 11, MASS. 

































woman was doing on the set, and then 
he used the same routine as a clever 
comedy bit in the picture. I’ve been 
following his advice ever since. 

“Try it sometime. It’s really sur¬ 
prising to discover the lazy way we 
all have of looking without seeing. 
Since I’ve learned the trick of using 
my eyes, I put that ‘seeing’ to work.” 

She goes on: “I like to study, too. 
I like that feeling of stretching my 
brain. My French and Spanish have 
improved tremendously, and I’ve done 
quite a few foreign language broad¬ 
casts. I felt pretty proud of myself, 
too, until some fans wrote and told me 
I spoke Spanish with a French accent. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS: Busy as a 
bird dog in quail season, (her govern¬ 
ment and commercial broadcasts, her 
publicity work, her studies and her 
incessant work), Joan’s still never too 
tied-up to entertain service men in 
military camps, in hospitals, and in 
her own home. 

That Burbank house is a week-end 
mecca for visiting GI’s, and she en¬ 
tertains simply and graciously with 
recordings, badminton bouts, ping- 
pong, home-made cookies and pleasant 
chatter. 

Her popularity with the men in uni¬ 
form is, they claim, because she’s 
so much “like the girl next door.” 
They keep her telephone lines hum¬ 
ming, deluge her with mail, bombard 
her with gifts. The gifts are wonder¬ 
ful and fantastic: A hula skirt made 
of 24,000 braided strands of parachute 
silk; a wood-inlaid box with her name 
on the lid in pearl; a hand-painted 
vanity case beaded in Oriental design; 
a perfect model of a Messerschmitt 
from Germany; wedge-soled sandals 
from the Philippines with hand-carved 
design on the hardwood wedges, and 
with tops of purple and gold cloth. 

FAMILY RELATIONS: “My family 
is important to me,” she says. “And 
that’s why I don’t understand girls 
who move away from home when they 
begin clicking in pictures. They take 
an apartment and forget their family 
ties. To my way of thinking, Holly¬ 
wood can’t give them anything sub¬ 
stantial enough to make up for their 
loss of family. Why, I wouldn’t know 
what to do without all the Brodels. 
They give me so much: encourage¬ 
ment, morale-boosting, constructive 
advice; they tear me down when I 
feel cocky, they watch my health, 
they—well, they’re a big part of me 
and my life. I wouldn’t trade even 
one of them for the fanciest career 
in the world.” 

Working on a share-and-share- 
alike basis, the Brodels get along 
beautifully. When Joan’s brother-in- 
law, band leader Dick Russom, was 
still a ferry pilot stationed in Wash¬ 
ington, Joan sent him boxes of soap. 
Dick carted the stuff to Europe on his 
regular ferrying flights and distributed 
it to the soapless children of France, 
Belgium and England. 

Discharged now, Dick and Mary 
(Joan’s sister) are working in Palm 
Springs. Mary sings with his band to 
an exclusive audience that demands 
a large and varied wardrobe. When 
she had run the gamut of her own 
evening wardrobe one day, Mary 
rushed up to Burbank to borrow 
something from Joan’s closet. Joan 
was caught short. 

“Good night,” she shrieked, “Bet¬ 
ty’s using some of my stuff in her 
night club work, and the rest of it 
is being cleaned through the studio, 
and that’s closed because of the 
strike!” 



ENLARGEMENT 


OF YOUR 
FAVORITE PHOTO 


M JUST TO GET ACQUAINTED! WE WILL MAKE 
YOU A BEAUTIFUL 5x7 ENLARGEMENT OF ANY 
SNAPSHOT, PHOTO, OR NEGATIVE ABSOLUTELY FREE! 

Just send us your most cherished snapshot or photo (either actual 
picture or negative) and you will receive FREE a beautiful pro¬ 
fessional Hollywood Studio enlargement! Send baby's picture, 
that boy in service, mother’s, dad’s, yourself. You’ll be thrilled 
when you see it enlarged! Act NOW! 

IMPORTANT - Be sure to include color of hair, eyes and clothing 
and get our BARGAIN OFFER for having your enlargement 
beautifully hand colored in oil-and mounted in YOUR choice 
of handsome frames. Limit 2 to a customer. Please enclose 10c 
to cover cost of handling and mailing each enlargement. Artistic 
hand coloring adds character, beauty and personality to the en¬ 
largement! Your original will be returned with your FREE 5x7 
enlargement! Act now! 

HOLLYWOOD FILM STUDIOS 

7021 SANTA MONICA BOULEVARD • HOLLYWOOD(38) • CALIFORNIA 

HOLLYWOOD FILM STUDIOS, oept.ssa, j 


7021 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood 38, Calif. 

.snapshot or negative. 


(specify number, limit 2] 

I Please make_free enlargements. 

(specify number, limit 2] 

Handling & Mailing charge of 10c ea. is enclosed. 


Offer limited to U, S. 


Address_ 
City_ 


Fill out description below. 
Mark back of picture 1 & 2 
COLOR - Picture No. 1 

Hair_ 

Eyes_ 

Clothing_ 


COLOR - Picture No. 2 

Hair_ 

Eyes- 

Clothing- 



3 Make ANY Article 

.UMaII/, O'll#. JU, Vt I I / , vllMlIy 


~ 'Om-ililliO 'll* /•% f»\ '#»% ' | t * M V I I A I I I % MIX 

*■ 1 Magic New Discovery/ 


Make BIG Money... Have FUN! 

Don’t pay big prices for luminous articles. Make your own! 
Sell at big profit, or keep for your own pleasure. We furnish 
complete outfit including confidential instructions. Simple. Easy 
to use. A stroke of the brush—any article glows in the dark like 
magic! Lasts indefinitely. Absolutely harmless. With amazing 
LITE-GLO kits you can make hundreds of luminous articles. 


Glamorous orchids, exotic gar¬ 
denias, beautiful service flags, 
lovely earrings, flowers, ties, 
j switches, religious statues, Cru¬ 
cifixes, house numbers, furni¬ 
ture, pictures, clocks, stairs, 
holiday ornaments, signs, pull- 
cords, fuse boxes, door knobs, 

| etc., etc. Order NOW! Introduc¬ 
tory-size kit, $1.00, Senior kit, $2.00. 
NOTE! In $2.00 Outfit you receive 
[ THREE times as much material as 
in $1.00 Outfit. In addition, in $2.00 
Outfit you receive two colors of 
luminous paint—blue and purple. 
In the $1.00 kit, blue alone. Get the 
most for your money. Order the 
$2.00 kit; MONEY-BACK guar¬ 
antee protects you. 

LITE-GLO CO. 

Dept. 14-LB 
TOPEKA, KANSAS 


OLD 125,000 GLOWING STATUES 

One firm sold over 125,000 glowing statues 
of Christ for $1.00 each! Another sold 
25,000 glowing Crucifixes for $1.00 each! 
Others have sold hundreds of thousands of 
glowing jewelry, flowers, etc., for big prices 
and BIG PROFITS! Why not YOU! We 
show you how! Make big money! Have fun! 

SEND NO MONEY! 

Complete introductory-size kit, $1.00. 
Senior Kit. three times as much as $1.00 
kit, also two colors instead of one. only 
$2.00! Send coupon below or penny post¬ 
card. and pay postman $1.00 or $2.00 plus 
postage and handling. Or send cash we pay 
postage. Supply limited! Order NOW! 


ROOM! 


CLIP AND MAIL COUPON NOW! 


J LITE-GLO CO.. Dept. 14-LB, TOPEKA, KANS. J 

Please send me Lite-Glo Kits as marked below: fYou " 
I get three times as much for your money in the $2.00 • 
■ kit, plus two colors instead of one). 

i 

{ $1.00 Kit □ $2.00 Kit □ I 

Name.. d 

Address. | 

City. State. | 


93 






























Here's Something 
sfYoull Prize Ail Your Life/^ 



Tmpmti(ui FIGURETTE 


ACTUAL 
SIZE 
8" to 10* 
HI6H 


a life-like FIGURETTE of your 
loved one in service or loved ones 
at home or your pets. Just send any 
size negative, photo or snapshot 
and we’ll reproduce a handsome 
cutout FIGURETTE mounted 
on Moderne tempered Maison- 
ite. Truly a thing of beauty! 

Makes attractive ornament for 
table, radio, desk or dresser. 

This gorgeous FIGURETTE brings “the object of your af¬ 
fection” so near to you in one of the most realistic ways 
discovered by man. You’ll prize and treasure it all your 
life! AND WHAT A WONDERFUL AND APPRECIATED GIFT 
IT MAKES! No wonder many places charge two to three 
times our amazingly low introductory price. Order now. 


me 

i 


SEND NO MONEY 


FAST SERVICE. Just mail any size negative, photo or 
snapshot. Deposit $£.69 for one or $4.95 for two. plus 
postage with postman. Or send price and we’ll pay postage. 
YOUR PHOTO RETURNED WITH FIGURETTE. Keep for 10 
days and if not delighted with FIGURETTE. return for full 
refund. Special oil coloring $1.00 extra per person. 


Specify colors. 


ALLIED PHOTO CO. 

108 W. Lake St. Dept. 104 Chicago I, Ml. 


PROTECT YOUR CHARM 


NEW, EASY WAY TO REMOVE 
PERSPIRATION ODORS 
FROM YOUR CLOTHES 



BE DAINTY-ADORABLE ALWAYS! 


Keep your dresses, jackets and sweaters fresh and 
dainty at all times. Avoid embarrassment. Be popular, 
lovable, desirable. Banish offensive perspiration 
odors from your wardrobe. Dry cleaning cannot do it. 
BEAU MODE, the liquid fabric deodorant does. Just 
think—one $1 00 bottle treats 50 garments. BEAU 
MODE is your weapon to guard personal charm. So 
simple to use. So economical. Only 2c per garment. 
Gives constant protection in important social and 
business engagements. Be your own glamorous self. 
Say goodbye to perspiration saturated garments. No 
more offensive odors from your clothes with BEAU 
MODE. SEND NO MONEY. RUSH ORDER TODAY. 
You just pay postman $1.00 on delivery plus postage 
and C.O.D. charges. You save postage and C.O.D. 
charges if full payment of $1.00 accompanies order. 
Try BEAU MODE today. If you are not pleased beyond 
words, return bottle and purchase price will be cheer¬ 
fully refunded. Send to YORK STORES, 30-86 51st 
Street. Dept. C-l, Woodside, New York. 



1000 

II ru | Candid 
nCVf Type 

CAMERAS 

Each With A 
Roll of Film 


Take clear 
snapshots and 
pictures. We 
will send to 
boys or girls 


GIVEN AWAY 

at least the first lOOO women, men, 
answering this ad—a real, new candid type CAMERA and 
regular size roll of film:—all GIVEN for selling only one 
book of 8 coupons,—(each one good for 25c on our get- 
acquainted offer of a new. beautiful. 5x7 inch enlargement 
made from a snapshot or negative)—to your friends and 
neighbors at 25c each and returning the money collected 
as per FREE gift catalog. Send no money, just your name 
and address. We trust you. Write today. MOVYLAND 
PICTURE STUDIOS, Dept. S C. News Arcade Bldg., Des 
Moines, Iowa. 



TUS GARDEN 

COMES IN BEAUTIFUL 4-COLOR 
WATERPROOF PERMANENT BOX 

Imagine, complete with striking window 
garden box. 10 healthy Cactus plants—all 
different varieties, all bloom—can now be 
sold direct to you at this amazing low price 
because of shipping difficulties to stores! Order 
now .. . save on this opportunity! 


tTDCF Lovely hand-painted Mexican pot for window 
■ gin with columnar grower Lace Cactus blooms 

In purple, pink, red and yellow flowers. Gift to prompt 
orders! Hurry—send today. SEND NO MONEY—OR¬ 
DER NOW—PAY LATER. Or mail $1.69 with order, we 
pay postage. Satisfaction guaranteed or money back. Send 
name and address to PAN AMERICAN CACTUS CO..Dept. 
S-1408, 148 Monroe Ave., N.W., Grand Rapids 2, Mich. 


Dad Brodel poured oil on the trou¬ 
bled waters via a phone call, found 
out the name of the studio’s cleaners 
and trotted off to round up a ward¬ 
robe for his child. It took him a couple 
of hours, but Mary made it back to 
Palm Springs in time for her show 
that night. She looked very chic in 
Joan’s gowns, too. 

WHAT’S ON HER MIND? Rest. 
“If Sunday is supposed to be a day of 
rest,” Joan asks, “why don’t people do 
it? They yelp all week about the 
relaxation they’re going to get over 
the weekend, then they go out and 
play golf or tennis till they’re ready 
to drop in their tracks; or else they 
get a fine case of nervous indigestion 
by taking the family for a drive in 
heavy traffic. 

“People are always preparing to 
live, but they never seem to enjoy life 
while they’re about it. Sometimes I 
find myself doing the same thing. 
Studying and working day and night, 
until I realize I’m forever cramming 
like mad for something that never 
happens. Maybe I’m not expressing 
this thought well—it’s kind of a new 
one. But it bothers me. I keep won¬ 
dering why we drive ourselves at 
such a furious pace; what are we 
heading for? It’s been on my mind a 
lot lately.” 

What else is on her mind? Food! 
Kept on a perpetual diet because 
she’s inclined to be overly curvaceous, 
Joan’s thoughts are always on choco¬ 
late eclairs or some-such. An invet¬ 
erate doggerel artist, she penned the 
other day, “Nothing could be crueler 
than a cruller.” And this point poses 
a problem, since Joan loves them and 
can’t have them, and Dad Brodel 
wants them on the table every day. 

Joan’s forte is not cooking. “As a 
cook,” she says, “I’m a darned good 
actress.” 

She has a habit of disappearing into 
the kitchen to whip up a batch of 
cookies for the family and then eating 
half of them before they’re even cool. 

There’s an amusing device her pie- 
loving pop uses to keep her from 
temptation. When the mobile bakery 
in the Brodel neighborhood sounds its 
familiar klaxon, Dad Brodel (who’s 
been waiting around the house for 
hours for this moment) makes a great 
show of impressing Joan with the fact 
that he’s going out to get her a loaf of 
special diet bread. It takes him some¬ 
times half an hour to complete this 
curbstone purchase. 

Curious after weeks of this routine, 
Joan followed him one day. She dis¬ 
covered her father intercepting the 
baker about two houses down the 
street. He made quite a ritual of se¬ 
lecting a fresh lemon meringue pie, 
a dozen crullers, a box of cookies, and 
a special kind of cake. Then he 
chugged back to his own yard and hid 
his pastries in the family car. Ten 
minutes later he ambled into the 
house innocently bearing Joan’s lone¬ 
ly loaf. She says she has never told 
him she’s onto his trick because then 
it wouldn’t be fun any more. 

IN THE CRYSTAL BALL: “I want 
to do a musical from time to time,” 
Joan says, “but I’m really aiming for 
good, straight drama. I wish the 
studio would give me more pictures 
like ‘The Hard Way’ and ‘Too Young 
To Know.’ Maybe,” she says a little 
wistfully, “maybe if ‘Marilyn Miller’ 
is all I hope it will be—maybe they 
will give me a part that calls for 
really good emotional acting.” 

The End 


(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 141 

Dear Miss Wyman: 

I am coming to you with a problem and 
hope you can help me. 

I have been going with a swell boy for 
three years. He has been in the Navy for 
two years and we have been writing each 
other regularly. The last time he was 
home in January—he had just returned 
from the Pacific—he told me that some 
times he would get the feeling that he 
wanted to leave me, but claims that he 
will always love me and that while there 
is no one else in his life, he doesn’t think 
it is fair for me to wait for him. 

Since he went back to the Pacific, I 
have received a letter from him saying 
those feelings had come on him again, and 
that he feels we should break up. Then 
yesterday, I received another letter want¬ 
ing to know if I would wait for him till 
the war is over and until he could get on 
his feet again. 

Please tell me, do you think this boy 
really loves me? He has given me beau¬ 
tiful gifts; the last time when he was home, 
he gave me a diamond wristwatch. But 
why does he get those feelings that he 
wants to break up with me when he 
claims he hasn’t any reason to feel that 
way? 

May 


Dear May: 

After knowing this boy for three 
years, you should be better able to 
judge whether he is in love with you 
than a stranger could. Has it ever oc¬ 
curred to you that those “feelings”, as 
you call them, may be the result of at¬ 
tacks of war nerves? When your friend 
is low in spirits and feels a complete 
futility about everything, it’s probably 
the result of the stress and strain he is 
going through. 

So long as he seems to get over these 
puzzling spells, and so long as he claims 
he still loves you, I suggest that you be 
patient with him and continue your 
friendship, since it means so much to 
you. He seems in a very confused state 
of mind, and needs the balance wheel 
of understanding and confidence in him 
to steady him. 

Jane Wyman 


Dear Miss Wyman: 

I have just been married a month, and 
both of us are eighteen. My husband has 
been transferred to another city, and now 
my parents are beginning to nag me about 
him, and say he will change and he won’t 
be true to me and that I have made a 
mistake in getting married so young. I 
love my husband very much and he loves 
me, but my parents are making life so 
miserable for me telling me all these 
things. 

Do you think I have reason to worry 
about him? 

Dorothy 

Dear Dorothy: 

Don’t borrow trouble, as the saying 
goes. From your letter, I can’t see what 
you would have to worry about, since 
your husband loves you and you love 
him. You must remember that now you 
are an adult, a married woman, with a 
family unit all your own. Whatever 
anyone else may say to try and in¬ 
fluence you against your marriage, you 
must have the strength and faith to 
stand against all this, and defend your 
own marriage. This does not mean 
trouble with those who talk against your 
husband, but rather ignoring their re¬ 
marks, as pleasantly as possible, but 
all the time not letting them influence 
you one bit. 


94 


JANE WYMAN 












SrifQl 


M 



mucm 


LOSE WEIGHT IN POUNDS AND INCHES EXACTLY 
WHERE NEEDED by tbia Proven Scientific end Simple wey. 
Whet fboutendt heve done, you. too, mey accomplish in your 
spare moments—daily, easily, and in the privacy of your home. 
Our method of Weight Reduction and Body Toning is based 
on the principle of Hand Massage and Renewed Circulation, 
as used by Glamorous Stars of Stage, Screen and Radio, and 
by Leading Reducing Salons throughout the World. Used 
ertemelly ON ANY PART OF THE BODY. GLAMOUR 
MOLD breaks down Fatty Tissues and awakens Blood Circula¬ 
tion that carries away Waste Fat. Loose, Flabby Flesh and 
Qjj Muscles are toned to youthful firmness. Just a few short weeks, 
| — that is all it takes, to reveal YOUR BODY BEAUTIFUL I 

MANY REPORT LOSING 2 TO 10 INCHES — 10 TO 40 
POUNDS OF UGLY FAT I The GLAMOUR MOLD Self-Masseger requires 
No Strenuous Exercise, Drugs or Starvation Diets. It is Harmless, promises 
Quick Reaction, and Certain Results. 

REDUCE OR YOUR MONEY REFUNDED 

ORDER TODAY,.the simple-to-use GLAMOUR MOLD Self-Massage Kit 
— complete with booklet "REDUCE THE HOLLYWOOD WAY," and a 
generous supply of our Special Formula Massage Cream. Order NOW I 
DO NOT DELAY I Your money quickly refunded if not satisfied with 
results within 10 days. Send NO MONEY. On delivery simply pay $1.95 
plus postage. If you prefer, mail check or money order for $1.95 and save 
postage I Address: 

FILMARTE GLAMOUR 

MM Sanwt loalraid • D«frt. HG-1 • Hollyweed 7S, Colifwaio 



STAMMER? 


Stunning Eyelashes 

spell Attraction, Romance 

Don't let your eyes appear dull, drab, unattractive . . . 
rob you of popularity. Improve their beauty with LA- 
SHEEN. the new discovery that adds glorious, exciting 
allurement in just a few seconds. LASHEEN is not a 
mascara, but a scientific waterproof formula specially 
prepared to promote graceful, luxuriant eyelashes. Just 
apply LASHEEN on your own eyelashes . . . you can 
practically see them grow silkier, softer, more appealing 
. . . see them sparkle with tantalizing new charm. Your 
choice of black, brown, or neutral. State shade desired. 
Full year's supply, including Federal Tax and postage only 
$2.00 (If C.O.D., $2.35.) No C.O.D. to Canada. Order 
LASHEEN today—now—on our money-hack guarantee. 
LASHEEN, 220 Broadway, Dept, B-2, New York 7, N. Y. 

/ 

I This new 128-page book, “Stammering, 

I Its Cause and Correction,” describes the 
M Bogue Unit Method for scientific 

■ correction of stammering and stut- 
I tering — successful for 45 years. 

■ Free—no obligation. 

Beniamin N. Bogue, Dept.3375, Circle 
Tower. Indianapolis 4. Ing. 


DRAWforMONEY 


Be An ARTIST! 

Trained Artists Are Capable 
of Earning 

$30-$50-$75 A WEEK 

Learn to Draw at Home in Your 
Spare Time for a Fascinating Hobby 
and Profitable Art Career. 

It's interesting and pleasant to 
study Art the W.S.A. way. COM* 
MERCIAL ART. DESIGNING. 
CARTOONING ah in ONE com¬ 
plete home study course. No 
previous Art experience neces¬ 
sary-hundreds have profited by 
our practical method since 1914. 
TWO ART OUTFITS furnished. 
Full information in FREE 
BOOK. “Art for Pleasure and 
Profit” — tells all about our 
course, service — and commer¬ 
cial opportunities for you in 
Art. Mail coupon today. 




WASHINGTON SCHOOL OF ART, 
6tudio 332C. lllS-15th St., N.W., 
Washington (5), O. C. 

I Send your free catalog. 

and Profit,” and full particulars. 

| Name- 


I 

I Address--—-- | 

^ —---- state 1 


‘‘Art for Pleasure 
—Age- 


BE GLAD YOU'RE TALL 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 52) 


old optical cliche’s represented to 
make a Valkyrie look like a demi¬ 
john. 

I think that being tall is not only 
a physical condition, but a state of 
mind. Some of the most telling po¬ 
etical lines in literature were written 
in praise of the statuesque maid. 
Wrote Alfred, Lord Tennyson in “A 
Dream of Fair Woman”: “A daughter 
of the gods, divinely tall, And most 
divinely fair.” And in “Maud”, he 
wrote: 

“I kiss’d her slender hand 
She took the kiss sedately; 
Maud is not seventeen, 

But she is tall and stately.” 

Lord Byron in “Don Juan” praised 
a woman by saying, “Her stature (is) 
tall—I hate a dumpy woman.” And, 
of Juno, Virgil wrote, “By her height 
and her quick step was the goddess 
revealed.” 

If any girl can read those lines 
without lifting her head, straighten¬ 
ing her shoulders and stepping forth 
to the full extent of her height, she 
simply has no imagination. 

It would be absurd, of course, to 
engage in a discussion of the charm 
and potentiality of the tall girl, with¬ 
out admitting quickly and forcefully 
that she HAS problems. In the first 
place, a girl who has grown so rapidly 
that she has come to tower over her 
contemporaries—both male and fe¬ 
male—as a popular sapling lifts itself 
above scrub pine, is sometimes in¬ 
clined to imitate an accordion. She 
tries to take a pleat in her knees, she 
shirrs her diaphragm, she bows her 
shoulders, and she goes to the turtle 
for neck exercises. When she walks 
along the street with her friends, she 
is inclined to lean forward on the 
breeze, double her elbows, and lope. 

There is an easy way to correct an 
awkward posture and an unlovely 
gait, and it requires no strutting be¬ 
fore mirrors, and no exercise—only a 
determined imagination. The instant 
a girl arises from bed in the morn¬ 
ing, or from a chair where she has 
been reading, or from a classroom 
desk, she should assume her full 
weight in this easy way: she should 
think of herself as a limp, long- 
limbed puppet which is suspended 
from a string that is fastened to the 
top of her head. 

Do it now. Stand up. Don’t force 
yourself into what you think may be 
good posture; simply think of your¬ 
self as being suspended from the sky 
so that your feet will scarcely touch 
the floor. Your chin tips up, your 
chest assumes a forward tilt, your 
tummy flattens, and you couldn’t lope 
if you wanted to; you are able to take 
steps no longer than 18 inches and 
those are no effort because you are 
being carried along by your sky 
hook. 

The habit of hanging from the sky 
won’t be acquired in one day, but if it 
is practiced consciously you will soon 
be unable to slump or to walk un¬ 
gracefully. 

The next great problem is that of 
The Man In Your Life. There is a nat¬ 
ural law (no chance for repeal) that, 
in some respects, opposites attract 
one another; hence a tall girl will 
find that she will be found utterly 
winsome, again and again in her life, 


Y OUR OWN HAIIKAN MATCH 
THE GLAMOUR OF THE STARS 



Carol Douglas, 
lovely young 
starlet, models one of Ru¬ 
dolph's famous coiffures 
which you can easily dupli¬ 
cate. 

SET YOUR OWN HAIR 

IN A PROFESSIONAL MANNER 

FOLLOW SIMPLE INSTRUCTIONS BY THE 
FAMOUS HOLLYWOOD HAIRSTYLIST 

Who has just released his own book 
giving his personal technique on how you 
may easily set your own hair at home. 

Written in simple, easy-to-follow style, Rudolph 
shows you how to make sculptured pin curls, how 
to set them, how to brush them out and arrange 
them afterwards. Fully illustrated with large pho¬ 
tographs and diagrams showing the step by step 
method of each style. 

No particular skill is required. Anyone who can 
read con learn how to dress her own hair. No 
expensive equipment, no curlers, no gadgets to 
buy—all you need is your comb, brush, hairpins 
and Rudolph's own book of easy instructions. 

HAVE THAT PROFESSIONAL LOOK 

Now, you, yourself can give your hoir the glam¬ 
orous, professional style of your favorite star— 
from dozzling "high-waves" to youthful "page¬ 
boys." In addition many who already have this 
book ore earning extra money in their spare time 
setting hoir for others, as well as for themselves. 
Take odvantage now of Rudolph's book of in¬ 
structions. Fill out the coupon below and enclose 
one dollar (or request it C.O.D.). When you re¬ 
ceive your copy, should you not be obsolutely 
satisfied, return it with your name and address 
ond your money will be refunded immediately. 

LOOK AT WHAT YOU GET! 

•Jr 8 of the most popular hairstyles and 
how to duplicate them! 

•Jr Easy instructions on "How to Make 
Pin Curls"! 

•Jr Basic professional hairstyling infor¬ 
mation worth the price of the book 
clone! 

PIN THE COUPON , . , 

TO A DOLLAR BILL (no !,am P S 
AND MAIL TODAY _ - m m » • 


1 


a - 1 
t 


I 

• 

I 

I 

I 

t 


t 

I 

■ 

a 


• 'JZ.uMpA' 

Box JS^'caUiort"* oy of **°’ r 

H0 " yW ° 0d ma!l' me £*** ^ • 

p\e°se m -. (n Cur's ( 

Sty'* 4 °° s d ed 's 5' 00 . poy charge | 

O tnc '! f O D. ' p 

as end _ 

pleose P""'- 


95 






























SICKNESS BENEFITS! 

Polity pays for loss of time due 
to sickness, a regular monthly 
income for as long as 3 
months, up to. 




ACCUMULATED CASH! 

Policy pays for accidental loss 
of life, limb or sight up to 
$4,000, accumulated to. 


Pay8 $5 per day end other hospital ex- 
penses. For maternity up to^S50. Sick¬ 
ness and accident, as specified, to over,, 

Added millions can now afford all-round insurance protec¬ 
tion! This policy, issued by an old-line, LEGAL RESERVE 
company, costs but Sl-a-month; yet it provides liberal 
amounts of QUICK CASH when sickness or accident strikes 
... to replace Io6t income, pay hospital bills, etc. Covers any 
and all accidents, all the common sicknesses.^ 

NO waiting period for benefits! 

NO MEDICAL EXAMINATION 

required! No red tape! Policy issued BY MAIL 
al BIG SAVINGS. Ages 15 to 69. Actual Policy 
sent for 10 days' FREE Examination. ACT 
NOW! Write for it today. No cost. No obliga¬ 
tion. No salesman will call. 


FRFF 10-Day Inspection Coupon 


THE SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 
482-M Service Life Building Omaha 2, Nebr. 

Without cost or obligation, send your GOLD SEAL 
S1-A-M0NTH Policy for 10 DAYS’ FREE INSPECTION. 

Name 



Address. 
City_ 


. Age. 


-State- 


Beneficiary. 


900 RAINBOW MIX 

WBSB» 

0*La 



SENSATIONAL BARGAIN 
for Short Time Only • • • 

This amazing low price brings you 200, 
healthy 1st year size bulblets at a price al¬ 
most unheard of before 1 Varieties normally 
priced to sell for $6 to $10 in older 
bulbs! Beautiful Rainbow Mix to 
give your garden a riot of color! Sent 
in time for spring planting with full 
money back guarantee! Order Now! 

SEND NO MONEY—Just name 
and address; pay postman only $1.49 
plus C.O.D. postage on arrival (cash 
orders sent prepaid). Mail order 
TODAY to get this special offer! 

Send to MICHIGAN BULB CO„Dept.A14Q8. Grand Rapids 2, Michigan 


r 

• For ad* 

vance ordering, you 
wilt receive 3 Bloom¬ 
ing-size Tuberose Bulba 
absolutely FREE. 
Bloom 1st year into 
extremely fragrant, 
waxy-white, beautiful 
dower8. 



$1.98 


96 


FOR LADIES AND MEN Price 

Your Name Engraved—FREE only 

Handsome and sturdy. A sporty bracelet you 11 enjoy wearing 
and be proud to own. Skillfully made—a gleaming, ultra-smart 
creation. Wide curved name plate, strong link chain. Must 
be seen to be appreciated. Silver Plated. 

SEND NO MONEY —10 DAY TRIAL 

Wear 10 days on our Money Back Guarantee. Send name 
you want engraved. Pay postman only $1.98 plus postage 
and tax on arrival. You’ll be delighted! 

International Diamond Co., 2251 Calumet Ave., Dept.P 14, Chicago 16, Ill. 


by a man who is somewhat shorter 
than herself, or on a level, or only an 
inch or so taller. Frequently, the tall 
girl will discover great mental and 
emotional compatibility between her¬ 
self and her not-so-tall boy friend, so 
she will begin to try to be smaller. 
That is foolish. Her height, or the 
personality developed as a result of 
that height, attracted the man origi¬ 
nally, so it isn’t sensible to attempt to 
lessen or alter the very characteristic 
which appealed in the first place. 
There are many men, and they prove 
to be the most interesting and com¬ 
fortable companions, who seek in a 
girl what they feel they lack. As man 
in America is still the aggressor, be 
sure that a boy has been attracted by 
you as you were when he first saw you 
or he wouldn’t have asked asked you 
for a date. Furthermore, just as a gen¬ 
eral rule I don’t believe in a girl 
making herself over for a man; if 
there is to be any making over—she 
should do it for herself, to please her 
sense of inner harmony. And don’t 
worry, some man will come along to 
appreciate such a girl. 

In general, I would say that there 
are two types of tall girls: the Willow 
Wand sort, and the Heroic. The Wil¬ 
low is the slim type, of course, and 
Heroic is her bigger-boned, heavier 
sister. Among the tall girls whom I’ve 
dressed are Loretta Young, who is 
about 5'7"; Ilka Chase, 5'7"; Gail 
Patrick, 5'8"; Hilary Brook, 5'7"; In¬ 
grid Bergman, 5'8", Rise Stevens, 
5'7%"; and Kirsten Flagstad, 
or 10". 

The Willow Wand girl, of which 
Loretta Young and Katharine Hep¬ 
burn are good examples, on occasion 
can wear frilly, feminine things. In 
one of Miss Hepburn’s stage plays, 
she wore a chiffon frock consisting 
of a cloudy, circular skirt, a high 
neck, and huge sleeves drawn into 
chaste cuffs; she looked enchanting. 

The Heroic girl, of which Kirstan 
Flagstad is an excellent example, 
should build her wardrobe on more 
austere types of clothing, concentrat¬ 
ing on sports clothing. If you are the 
Heroic type, don’t give up at this point 
and groan, “But I’m SICK of tweeds.” 
Of course you are. Just read on. 

It is an astonishing fact today that 
the menu served by the average 
housewife is better balanced than the 
wardrobe she has selected for her¬ 
self. Girls in high school and college, 
who are well versed in the import¬ 
ance of vitamins and minerals and 
calory balance, will be completely at 
a loss in the clothes department once 
they have abandoned the safety of 
sloppy joes, pleated skirts, and saddle 
oxfords. 

So, as a Healthful Haberdashery 
guide, I’ll list the ingredients of what 
I consider a well-balanced wardrobe 
for housewife, business girl, co-ed, or 
high school girl. 

2 suits 

1 black dress, VERY SIMPLE 

1 date dress of her most becoming 
color 

2 coats (one shortie, one full length). 

Because I am writing principally 

for the tall girl in this article, I’m go¬ 
ing to designate the variations on this 
main theme, that are possible for. my 
Valkyrie. 

It is the tall girl who is able to wear 
high fashion; it is the tall girl who 
has the cardinal opportunity to look 
extremely well-dressed; it is the tall 
girl who has the opportunity to use 
color to break the lines of her cos¬ 
tume in preference to silhouette. 


IF YOU SEW/' 


Just released! Sensational in- ■ 
vention that will enable you to ' 
darn stockings perfectly mark ' 
linens, lace curtains and clothing < 
far faster, easier and better than i 
before! You can also use Inven- < 
tion for embroidering, quilting, < 
stitching, marking linens, over- < 
casting seams and many other* 
purposes. When attached to T™ 
sewing machine you’ll be able to sew crossways, 
backwards, forwards, or in ANY direction! Guar¬ 
anteed to fit ANY sewing machine regardless 
of age or make! You get complete invention — 
nothing more to buy now or ever — for only 39c, 
three for il.00! FREE! EXTRA with orderl 
Amazing needle threader with which you may 
thread even finest thread in dark! Order now. 
Supply limited. Money-back guarantee. 

Sewing Invention, Dept. 425-B,Topeka, Kansas 


Wrinkles 

Destroy Loveliness 

A FREE booklet sent in plain 
wrapper tells you how the fa¬ 
mous Kathryn Murray 5- 
Minute Facial Exercises are 
the easy, natural way to re¬ 
gain young beauty. Simple exer¬ 
cises stimulate circulation; help to 
eliminate crow’s feet, wrinkles, 
double chin and to make face and 
neck muscles firm. No straps! No 
massages! Many women say they 
look 10 years younger. Proved suc¬ 
cessful by over 36,000 women since 1912. 

SEND NO MONEY 

Write today for your FREE BOOKLET. Only 
3 limited number on hand, so hurry. No obli¬ 
gation—no salesman will call. 

KATHRYN MURRAY, Ine. 

Suite 215, 8 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 3 



BOOKKEEPERS! 

BECOME EXPERT ACCOUNTANTS! 

Every day bookkeepers just like you are learn¬ 
ing accountancy—stepping out of bookkeeping 
drudgery into executive accounting jobs at 
$2,000-$5,000 a year as Accountants, Auditors, 
Comptrollers, C. P. A.’s. LaSalle’s home train¬ 
ing in spare time fits you for such promotions 
—brings them now instead of years from now. 
Instruction to suit individual needs—from Ele¬ 
ments of Accounting to C. P. A. Coaching. 36 
years’ success assures results. Thorough but 
inexpensive. Liberal terms, if you wish. Don’t 
watch others get ahead. Go out and succeed 
yourself! Write for FREE book “Accountancy, 
The Profession That Pays.” Address: 

LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY 

A Correspondence Institution 
417 S. Dearborn Street, Dept. H-219 Chicago 5 V Illinois 


NOSE AND THROAT 
CONGESTION 

Why start the day with hawking, caused 
by colds, sinus and catarrh? Try this ‘‘old 
stand-by method ” that thousandsfor69years 

have used . . . HALL S 2-METH0D TREATMENT. 

Loosens and helps clear up phlegm-filled 
throat and nasal congestion or money back. Ask your 
druggist. Write for FREE VUamiub’HealthCharl todayI 
F. J. Cheney & Company Dept. 52 Toledo, Ohio 




PICK OF THE PIN-UPS 

Your favorite stars in latest portrait or 
pin-up poses. Make your collection the 
envy of your friends. 

BEAUTIFUL HI-GLOSS PHOTOS 
FREE: with each order, list of photos and 
how to join FAN FOTO CLUB. 

★Send 10c for photo of your favorite star 
or $1 for 12 different photos. State sec¬ 
ond choice. 


DANEL’S PHOTO SERVICE Los Angeles 36, Calif., Dept. A 


















































My tall girl has bought two suits; 
one is matching solid color. Because 
my particular model has brown eyes, 
we’ll say that she has selected a cin¬ 
namon brown gabardine, man-tai¬ 
lored suit. Her second suit is a mis¬ 
match: she has bought a collarless, 
plaid (beige-brown-orange or red) 
cardigan, and a beige skirt. Obviously, 
she now has four suits: the monotone 
gabardine, and the mismatch. Then 
she can use her plaid jacket with her 
cinnamon skirt, and her cinnamon 
jacket with her beige skirt. 

And, since she is tail, I want her to 
buy cummerbunds—several of them. 
A cummerbund is a wide silk sash, a 
modification of the bull-fighter’s silk¬ 
en waist wrapping. To wear with her 
cinnamon brown suit, my tall girl 
should buy a Kelly green cummer¬ 
bund, an orange, a red, an Alice blue, 
or a purple band. With her suit and 
band, her blouse must be matching 
cinnamon or white. Naturally, when 
she wears the plaid coat, she will wear 
a band that picks up one of the colors 
in the plaid. 

In addition to these wardrobe 
brighteners, the tall girl can wear 
vests; she can make herself a pair of 
epaulettes and wear them on the gab¬ 
ardine jacket (not on the plaid) on 
occasion. She can make a pair of 
four-inch initials out of some stiff¬ 
ening material, wrap them with yarn, 
and wear them on her gabardine 
jacket as a lapel ornament. 

And the tall girl can wear massive 
belts; for her the crushed leather Cos¬ 
sack belt; for her the nail-studded 
gaucho belt; for her a gold belt from 
which jingle lacquered, imitation 
coins. 

If the tall girl wants to augment 
her wardrobe with a smart, but sur¬ 
plus garment, she can indulge in a 
Cossack overblouse. The Heroic type, 
particularly, is impressive in over¬ 
sleeves, and broad-shouldered coat 
that tapers to neat hips from which 
the belted coat skirt suddenly flares. 

So much for suits. 

That little black dress is the most 
important single item in the ward¬ 
robe of the tall girl, because it is like 
an empty room: anything can happen 
to it. The tall girl can use tie-ons to 
her mirror’s delight; she can perfect 
a bright little bustle, sewed on a rib¬ 
bon, and tie it around her waist; she 
can wear taffeta cocktail aprons; she 
can make a pair of huge pockets of 
drapery brocade or some other dra¬ 
matic material (mink, if she knows 
a mint-lined relative who is about 
to toss out an old fur coat), sew them 
on each side of a slim belt, and add 
that touch to her basic black dress. 

I am a great believer, incidentally, 
in pockets for tall girls. I like to add 
patch pockets to every coat I design 
for a tall girl; sometimes I like two 
pockets on either side of the coat 
above the waist, and two somewhat 
larger pockets below. 

Of course I have some pet peeves 
about clothing in general; personally, 
I loathe the sight of a woman shop¬ 
ping in slacks. Slacks certainly have 
their place in the clothing scheme, but 
their use should be confined to the 
active sports for which they were de¬ 
signed. The tall girl should chose her 
slacks with extreme care; the pedal 
pusher and clam digger types, I think, 
are somewhat more becoming to both 
Willow Wand and Heroic than other 
variety of trousers. 

I don’t like peasant clothes on any¬ 
one, and I think they are an especial 
abomination on a tall girl. I don’t like 


DON’T DYE GRAY HAIR 


. . . until you try the new 
color-control method of 
Mary T. Goldman's! Then 
watch your hair take on the 
beautiful, natural - looking 
color you desire, quickly— 
or so gradually your friends 
won't guess. 

Simply do this: Buy a 

bottle Mary T. Goldman’s 
1 *• ...just comb it through your 
gray, bleached, or faded hair. See how this 
new scientific color-control gives you the 
youthful hair shade you want. Pronounced 
harmless by competent medical authorities 
(no skin test needed). Will not harm your 
wave or change the smooth, soft texture of 
your hair. It’s inexpensive and easy to apply, 
too. For over 50 years millions have found new 



hair beauty by using Mary T. Goldman's in 
the privacy of their homes. 

So help yourself to beautiful hair—today! 
Buy a bottle of Mary T. Goldman’s at your 
drug or department store on money-back 
guarantee. Or, if you'd rather try it first, 
mail coupon below for free test kit. 

^Mory T. Goldman Co., 946 Goldman Bldg. 

I St. Paul 2, Minn. Send free sample. Check color | 
| □ Black □ Dark Brown □ Light Brown ■ 
| □ Medium Brown □ Blonde □ Auburn J 

| Name. ^ 

| Address ..•••••••••••••••••••••••■••••• ■ 

| _City ...State.J 


MOVIE STAR PHOTOS IN COLOR 



Betty Grable 


scrap book or in your movie album. 

TOM DRAKE—JANE RUSSELL—GREGO R Y PECK—JUDY GAR¬ 
LAND—ROBERT WALKER—VERA HRUBA RALSTON—JEANNE 
CRAIN—DANA ANDREWS—INGRID BERGMAN—JOHN HODIAK 
—GENE TIERNEY—FRANK SINATRA—VAN JOHNSON—JUNE 
ALLYSON—ALAN LADD—LANA TURNER—ROY ROGERS—BETTY 
GRABLE—ALICE FAYE—SONJA HENIE—PAULETTE GODDARD— 
JOAN CRAWFORD —DANE CLARK —GLORIA DeHAVEN — 
SHIRLEY TEMPLE—WILLIAM EYTHE—BOB HUTTON—LON MC¬ 
ALLISTER — BING CROSBY —CLARK GABLE —BETTY HUTTON — 
LAUREN BACALL—GREER GARSON—MARGARET O'BRIEN. 

These photos are printed on heavy coated paper, 8 x 10, in FULL 
COLORS. Your choice of any eight listed above for 50c—16 for 
SI. 00—entire set of 34 only $2.00. DON’T WAIT. Mail your 
order NOW. 

IRVING KLAW : 212 EAST 14 ST. 

Dept. EE-5 New York City 3, N. Y. 



ENLARGEMENT 

Just to get acquainted, we will beautifully enlarge your favorite snap¬ 
shot, photo, Kodak picture, print or negative to 5x7 
" inches, if you enclose this ad with a 3c stamp for return 
mailing. Please include color of hair and eyes and get 
our new Bargain Offer giving you your choice of handsome 
frames with a second enlargement beautifully hand tinted 
in natural lifelike colors and sent on approval. Your orig¬ 
inal returned with your enlargement. Send today. 

DEAN STUDIOS, Dept. 1446. 211 W. 7th St.. Des Moines, Iowa 



STAMP 


Lovely House Dresses 

2 A $ 3 69 

Yes, lovely dresses that are so hard to 
find at this time. Colorful cottons . . . 
easy to wash, easy to Iron! Comfortable, 
youthful, easy-to-slip-into! Spacious 
pockets! You'll fall in love with these 
dresses. But the big surprise is the price. 
Yes, 2 dresses for only $3.69—far less 
than you ever thought possible. Sizes 
14 to 20 and 40 to 46. In ordering, state 
size desired. Enclose $1.00 deposit, bal¬ 
ance C.O.D. plus postage. We GUAR¬ 
ANTEE you must be delighted or we will 
refund the purchase price. 

L & S TRADING CO., Dept. H-2 
P.O. Box 75. Station Y, Brooklyn 4, N. Y. 




FEET HURT? 


•TRY DR. BARRON’S NEW FOOT CUSHION 

Do you suffer from metatarsal callouses, corns, 
weak arch foot pains? Try Or. Barron’s New 
Foot Cushions. LIKE WALKING ON A PIL- 
LOW! Soft, Spongy, Air-ventilated. Fits all 
shoes. Cushions your arches and feet from heel 
to toes. Dr. Barron says: *‘Wonderful for 
tired, aching feet!" Send only $1.98 lor A 
PAIR, or C.O.D. plus postage. State shoe size 
and if man or woman. 30-DAY TRIAL 
GUARANTEE. Money hack if no blessed relief. 
ORTHO CO.. Ill W. 83 ST. Dept.37B- N.Y.C.24 


Two ways 

your face can pw 
in ihe next few years 

There’s a simple and pretty accurate 
way to tell which way your face is going 
to go in the next few years: 

If you are buying, regularly, and hold- 
ing as many U. S. Savings Bonds as you 
can, you needn’t worry. 

Your face will be among the ones that 
wear a smile. 

Buy ill the Bonds you an... 
keep all Ihe Bonds you buy! 

MOVIELAND 

MAGAZINE 


1946 


1956 




97 




























I 



ONLY 


plus 

postage 


GUARANTEE: 


Money re¬ 
funded if you 
don’t feel these 
are equal to 
dresses sell- 
ing for sev¬ 
eral dollars 
more. 


NO MONEY 


—We Mail C.O.D. 


BROADWAY FASHIONS 
1 1 81 Broadway . N . Y. I. N. Y. 

I BROADWAY FASHIONS 
] 1181 Broadway, New York I, N. Y. 

| Please send roe ....Ann Windsor Original at $4.84 i 
j plus postage. 

.Copen _Aqua ....Melon 

i (Mark 1st & 2nd Choice) 


YOU CAN HAVE an.. 


ANN 

WINDSOR 

ORIGINAL 


Direct 

from New York 


Without Shopping for it! 


Adorable button- 
front dress in sup- 
3 pie all - rayon 
fabric. Soft, 
flattering bow, 
gay buttons, popu- 
1 a r deep-sling 
pockets. Fine 
details; tailor¬ 
ed like a bet¬ 
ter dress. 


White stripe on 
copen blue, aqua, 
melon. 


SIZES: 12 to 20 


Size: ....12 ....14 ....16 ....18 ....20 

NAME. | 

j ADDRESS. j 

I CITY. t . ZONE_ STATE... 



HOW TO EARN MONEY 
AS A WRITER 

Free Booklet Points the Way 

The demand for writers is 
creating great new oppor¬ 
tunities for people with an 
urge to write—full time or 
part time. It’s not as hard to 
succeed as you may imagine. 
Most famous authors come 
from ordinary walks of life 
and learned the slow, hard 
way through trial and error. 
But now there’s a direct road 
—Palmer Institute’s Home 
Study Training (Established 

Katharine Ntwlin Burt . IQ 17 T 
author of many beet tell- 

Endorsed By Writers 

and recently Fiction Edi- (^TOQUOteS 

tor of Ladiet Home Jour - 

JXi ™ 8 , Rupert Hughes, Ruth Com- 

startea ten years sooner . ’ , . ,, 

on a literary career. But fOI*t Mitchell, Gertrude Ath- 

Paimer ln ~ erton and other famous 
authors and scores of suc¬ 
cessful graduates testify to helpfulness of 
Palmer Training. “I had never sold a word 
of fiction before enrolling. My first three 
stories sold for $45, $250 and $100” says H. S. 
S., Hollywood. C. P. of Ohio graduates from 
“pulps” to “slicks.” 

Learn At Home 

At home, you too may learn Action writing, the 
best basis for all fields—short stories, novels, features, 
articles, radio scripts. Complete instruction material 
and professional coaching to develop your own style. 
FREE booklet explains how you may enjoy an ideal 
part time or full time career. Write today (no sales¬ 
man will call)—Palmer Institute of Authorship. Est. 
1917, 6362 Hollywood Blvd., Desk D-12, Hollywood 
25. California. 

f ---| 

a PALMER INSTITUTE OF AUTHORSHIP, 
Established 1917 
1 6362 Hollywood Boulevard 
I Hollywood 28. California, Desk D-12 

I Please send me free illustrated booklet. “The Art * 

■ of Writing Salable Stories”, explaining how the unique I 
_ features of your training help new writers get started ■ 

■ and experienced writers increase their income. I ■ 
| understand this request is confidential and no sales- I 


man will call. 


Name.. 
Address 


I city. Zone.... State 


the appearance of wedgies on anyone, 
but I think they are particularly un¬ 
becoming to the statuesque girl. 

This reference, naturally, brings up 
the entire question of shoes. I feel 
very strongly about the error of a tall 
girl trying to live in flat heels. Cer¬ 
tainly flat heels, have an important 
place in the shoe scheme; they are 
smart with sport things, and sensible 
as well. But a tall girl should wear 
high heels when she is dressed for a 
party. She should select her footwear, 
not with a deprecating eye on her 
height, but with a view to the smart 
total effect she wishes to create. If 
my young tree of a girl is 6'6", she 
still should wear high heels with a 
black faille suit, or a black crepe aft¬ 
ernoon dress. A girl should dress to 
suit an occasion, not to pamper a 
phobia. 

Occasionally I receive a letter from 
a girl who is planning to be married 
to a man exactly her height. “If I wear 
satin slippers with three-inch heels, 
I’ll tower above him,” my correspond¬ 
ent is likely to wail. I agree that, at 
one’s wedding, it is pleasant to be 
kissed from above the nose, instead of 
upward from the chin, so I relent my 
shoe-rule for this occasion. 

If a tall girl is to be married in 
white satin, she should wear white 
satin ballet slippers, which are very 
smart now, anyhow. 

In case a tall girl has planned to 
be married in a suit, and that would 
certainly require high heels on such 
an occasion, I suggest that she plan 
an afternoon wedding and wear a 
long, very simple dinner dress in¬ 
stead. If she feels that she may have 
little use for the dinner dress after¬ 
ward (not a formal, mind you), she 
should select a frock that can be 
shortened and used afterward as an 
informal afternoon dress. 

As for the manner in which a tall 
girl should do her hair: I do not be¬ 
long to that school of thought which 
holds that the towering lady should 
stick to a long bob, and only the 
petite girl can wear an “up-do.” 

I think that a hair style should be 
determined by facial contours; a tall 
girl with a broad, square face will find 
an updo becoming; she may find that 
a long bob makes her look like some¬ 
thing Rembrandt painted when he 
was mad at the City Council. The 
slim-faced, fragile girl of height may 
need a puff arrangement about the 
face that some people would swear 
increased her height. It makes no dif¬ 
ference. The hairdress most becoming 
to a girl when she is seated and her 
height is not a factor, is still the 
most becoming when she unfolds. 

Incidentally, if you are six feet tall, 
or over, you should form a Tip-Top- 
per’s Club in your state and get to¬ 
gether for monthly or semi-annual 
meetings. The Tip-Toppers’ in Los 
Angeles join forces with a male Tip- 
Topers group (men must be 6'4" or 
over to join), and have a wonderful 
time. 

If you feel that you need additional 
clothes tips, you will find them in a 
book I have just published, entitled 
“What Should I Wear.” I think it will 
prove helpful to millions of girls— 
that’s why I wrote it. 

In conclusion, I’d like to say that 
being happy as a tall girl requires 
precisely the same philosophy that 
finding any sort of happiness de¬ 
mands: be at home with yourself, 
know your advantages, and seek to 
enhance your natural assets. 

The End 


HOSPITALIZATION 
SECURITY 


TO $325 
SURGICAL 


SAVES YOU UP 
ON HOSPITAL & 

FEES 

When sickness strikes ... be pre¬ 
pared! Don't gamble with the lives 
of your precious ones. Have 
the best possible coverage for 
you and your family. Hospital¬ 
ization insurance is inexpen¬ 
sive. but the benefits save you 
hundreds of dollars. Hospital 
and surgical care is provided 
with this policy Without draw¬ 
ing on your savings. Don’t 
cash your war bonds . . . get 
this security and protection . . .. 
get the FREE facts, how to 
protect every member of your 
family. 

No Medical Examination 
Best Possible Coverage 

This plan permits you to select 
5'our own doctor and hospital 
anywhere in the United States. 

It costs so little but does so 
much. Act today . . . hospital 
care is often the difference be¬ 
tween life and death. Plan is 
available for men and women 
up to 70 years of age and all 
children. 



■ FREE booklet upon 

REQUEST 

Interstate Mutual Benefit Ass'n 

1 

1 Dept. 2002, Dover, Delaware. 

Please send me FREE full details concerning your > 

Hospitalization Policy. 

| 

| Name. 

. | 

| Address. 

1 

. | 

| City. Zone... 

. State. ^j 


r Amazing PICTURE 
FORECASTS WEATHER 

k ¥o 24 HOURS IN ADVANCE! 


Predict weather up to 24 hours 
in advance! Our clever, amaz¬ 
ingly accurate “Sleeping Baby" 

Picture guaranteed to work! 

>y hen baby’s panties are BLUE, 
gear weather is indicated; 

VIOLET—changeable; PINK 
—look out for rain! Delicate, 
life-like colors. Attractively 
framed. Makes wonderful gifts. 

Why pay $5. $10 or even $1 for 
a barometer when you can get 
this accurate, inexpensive fore¬ 
caster for only 59c or two for 
51.00. Send money now or 
order C.O.D. Don’t wait! 

WEATHER FORECASTER 
Dept* 424-B Topeka, Kansas 



ANY PHOTO ENLARGED 

Size 8 x 10 Inches 
on DOUBLE-WEIGHT PAPER 

Same price for full length or 
bust form, groups, landscapes, 
pet animals, etc., or enlarge¬ 
ments of any part of group 
picture. 

Original returned with yoor 
enlargement. 

SEND NO MONEY 

E tive or snapshot (any size) and receive your 
•gement, guaranteed * ‘ ' 

>ub!e-weight por 



3 for $1.25 



enlargement, guaranteed fade’ess, on beautiful 

double-weight portrait quality paper. Pay 

postman 67c plus postage—or send 69c with order 

and we pay postage. Take advantage of this amazing offer now. Send 
your photos today. 

PROFESSIONAL ART STUDIOS 

lOO East Ohio Street Dept. 516-B Chicago (11), III. 



PSORIASIS 

(SCALY SKIN TROUBLE) 

DERITIOIL 


Prove it yourself no matter 
how long you have suffered 
or what you have tried. 
Beautiful book on psoria¬ 
sis and D e r m o i I with 
amazing, true photo, 
graphic proof of results 
sent FREE. Write for it. 


Don’t mistake eczema 
for the stubborn, ugly 
embarrassing scaly skin 
disease Psoriasis. Apply 
non-staining Derm oil. 

Thousands do for scaly 

S )ots on body or scalp. 

rateful users, often after 
years of suffering, report 

the scales have gone, the m m w m 

red patches gradually disappeared and 
H le ,L e i lJ £ yed the i hri11 of a clear skin again. Dermoil 
osed by many doctors and is backed by a positive ae 
*?i.y e definite benefit in 2 weeks or money is 
£SiaS«ii7i2iii U K question. Send lOc (stamps or coin) 
KJStT?°% Ie to *nake our famous “One Spot Te 
lest it yourself. Results may surprise you. Write toda' 
n?«ini^ St n« 0t »V e H 9 aut *on: Use only as directed. Print 
Sol « by L '99 et t and Walgreen I 
Stores and other leading Druggists. LAKE LABORATOR 
547 Northwestern Station. Dept. 3430. Detroit 4 IV 


98 














































WHO'S NEW 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2 71 


I 





Print and Picture Sample 


U S School of Music. 1582 Brunswick 
B!dg., New York 10. N. Y. 

s r nd "?? ,£ree Booklet and Print-and-Picture 
Sample. I would like to play (Name Instrument) 

Instrument. In”t™men't?. 


Name. 


(Please Print) 


Address. 




» 


Famous Speedwriting system. No signs 
or symbols: uses ABC’s. Easy to learn; 
easy to write and transcribe. Fast preparation for a 
job. Surprisingly low cost. 100.000 taught bv mail. 
Used in leading offices and Civil Service. Write for 
free booklet. 


Beautiful Ri 
MOVIE STAR 
PHOTOS 


3 

FOR 

30c 


Special 

Offer! * v 
Send Only $1 
for 12 Thrilling 
Photos 


Gorgeous, glossy photos of 
your favorite Hollywood 
Stars in their newest poses! 
Customers love our photos, 
you will, too! Smallest 
Order 30c. Name 
2nd choices. 

FREE! G i f t 

Coupons and 
Catalog of over 
200 exciting 
photos with 
order. 

Van Johnson, 
M.G.M. Star. 


DELUXE PHOTO SERVICE Dept. N-25 

8ox 953 Church St. Annex. New York 8, N. Y. 


your fa¬ 
vorite picture, print, negative, 
or snapshot, they’re gorgeously 
hand-colored, mounted on wood- 
base and carved from wood with 
a three-dimensional colorful real- 
life effect! 7 l /2 inches tall. Per¬ 
manent. easily cleaned with 
damp cloth. Ideal for those 
in Service, or Mother. Father. Sister, Brother. Only 
$1.00 postpaid for picture of ONE person, pet or object. 
For each additional person add 10c each. For example: 
8tatuette of two persons costs $1.10; three persons. SI.20. 
etc. Send money TODAY with picture or negative and 
coloring instructions. Or order C.O.D. Pay mailman. 
Fast service! MONEY-BACK guarantee! Supply lim¬ 
ited. Order NOW! A perfect gift for those in Service 
or the folks at home. 

AMERICAN STUDIOS 

Dept. 281-S LA CROSSE, WISCONSIN 


LfcANN AT HOME Simple as A-B-C—lessons con¬ 
sist of real selections, instead of tiresome exercises. Each 
easy lesson adds a new “piece” to your list. You read real 
notes, too—no ’numbers” or trick music. Method is so 
\ la *x our 750.000 students are band 

5 t n r d O orc i?« Str » a EEA ^ ER S. Everything is in print and pic¬ 
tures. First you are told what to do. Then a picture 

shows you how. In a short 
time you may become a 
good musician! 

Mail coupon for Free 
Book and Print and Pic¬ 
ture Sample. Mention fa¬ 
vorite instrument. 

U. S. SCHOOL Of MUSIC 1S82 
Brunswick Bldg., New York 10. N.Y. 


Easy 


as A-BC 


given its lavish Hollywood premiere. 

Kleig lights swept the skies, traffic 
jammed the streets, and hundreds of 
movie fan spectators clapped and 
cheered as filmdom’s great stepped 
from their hearse-like limousines, ut¬ 
tered gracious inanities into the side¬ 
walk microphone, and hurried into the 
theater. Collecting their tickets at the 
door was a very tall and handsome 
young man, resplendent in a gold 
braided uniform, who said “Your 
ticket, please” in nervous excitement 
as he recognized Tyrone Power, Son- 
ja Henie, Cesar Homero and others of 
stellar stature. 

Suddenly an unglamorous figure, a 
thick-set, rather squatty stranger, 
tried to brush by the door. The young 
man, true to his trust, put out a re¬ 
straining hand. “One moment, sir, 
your ticket please,” he said politely. 
A torrent of words, complete gibber¬ 
ish in sound, was the stranger’s re¬ 
sponse as he again tried to hurry by. 
The young man stiffened. 

“Your ticket , please!” he repeated 
in deadly tones. Again he was met by 
a flood of alien sounds, augmented 
this time by furious gesturings. 
Whereupon he calmly grabbed the 
stranger by the scruff of his neck and 
the seat of his pants and deposited 
him, squealing in rage, on the curb 
of the street! In true mob fashion, 
the spectators cheered in delight at 
such a forthright bouncing a would- 
be gate crasher. 

The next day the Chinese had a 
new doorman; the gate crasher, it 
turned out, was none other than the 
explosive director of the premiered 
picture, Gregory Ratoff! And the firm 
but unwitting young man who gave 
him the spectacular bum’s rush? He 
grew up to be Glenn Langan, cur¬ 
rently winning well-merited honors 
as the romantic lead with Gene Tier¬ 
ney in the 20th-Fox star-studded spe¬ 
cial, “Dragonwyck”! 

As a matter of fact, the infamous 
episode had a happy ending after all; 
it was because of Ratoff that Glenn 
got a chance to do something on the 
screen besides look handsome, which 
he does very well indeed. During the 
first months of his Fox contract Glenn 
rated only a few unimportant roles 
and an occasional closeup in such 
pictures as “Four Jills In a Jeep,” 
“Something For the Boys,” and “Wing 
and a Prayer.” Nor were his pros¬ 
pects much brighter, which led him 
to accept the male lead in a little 
theater production designed to spot¬ 
light attention on a new Fox starlet. 
Ratoff saw the play and went back- 
stage to congratulate Glenn on his 
work. 

“Thank you,” Glenn answered, “but 
perhaps you wouldn’t be so kind if you 
remembered who I am.” 

“Well,” said Ratoff, “who are you?” 

Glenn took a deep breath. “The guy 
who threw you out of the ‘Ali Baba’ 
premiere,” he said. Ratoff scowled 
fiercely at the memory. 

“I should keel you!” he said slowly. 
“Instead I will tell them you are a 
damgood actor.” 

He must have kept his promise and 
told them, for “them” soon cast Glenn 
in strong roles in “Hangover Square,” 
“A Bell For Adano,” and then “Drag¬ 
onwyck.” As a result the road to 
stardom lies directly and certainly 



appear 

m 60 SECONDS 

anUnuMtvilladoteif&ul 


"SLEND-R 

FORM” 

2-WAY 

STRETCH 

GIRDLE 

SUPPORTER 


INVISIBLE 

‘CONCENTRATED 

ZONE” 

SUPPORTS 

AT THE 
STOMACH 

REAR 

WAIST-HIPS 


SEE THESE IMPROVEMENTS IN YOURSELF 
WITHIN 10 DAYS . . OR YOUR MONEY BACK! 


• Helps You Look Slender at Once? 

• Helps You Look and Feel More Youthful! 

• Helps Your Bustline! 

Takes in stomach and expands chest. 

• You Appear Taller! 

Correct posture gives you full height. 

• You Attain Poise! 

By overcoming that ‘‘slouch” 


Takes in Inches Where You Need It Most! 

Why bulge all over and lack appeal? Be attractive! Be 
desirable! You too can help yourself to a more slender 
youthful figure as thousands of women have with the re¬ 
markable * t SLEND-R-FORM” girdle supporters. So light, 
yet firm . . . YOU FORGET YOU HAVE IT ON! Walk, sit, 
bend with comfort! On and off in a jiffy. Elastic two-way 
stretch with invisible “CONCENTRATED-ZONE” Sup¬ 
ports takes in inches around hips, waist, rear and stom¬ 
ach! Cool and comfortable on your body. Reinforced 
waistline and FIRM ELASTIC GARTERS help to prevent 
curling on top and bottom! Clothes fit smoothly! Wear 
smaller size dresses! Fits as well as one made to order. 
Become one of our satisfied customers! Only $2.98 for all 
sizes. Worth much more. ORDER NOW WHILE THEY 
LAST! 


SEND NO MONEY! 


Don't send a cent! 
Wear for lO days 
at our expense 
and see for yourself the improvement and appeal of your 
new figure! Just mail coupon now! 


FREE 


SECRETS OF 
BEAUTY AND 


CHARM! 


Packed with priceless secrets by Dr. E 
Bowers, well known authority 
on beauty and personality. 

Shows you how to easily and 
safely gain or lose weight, 
clear complexion, brighten 
eyes, beautify hair, speak 
charmingly, develop person¬ 
ality and many more valu¬ 
able secrets. This full-size 
book sells for $1.98 alone. 

But now it is yours FREE 
with the order of the 
“SLEND-R-FORM” Girdle 
Supporter. LIMITED COPIES 
—ORDER NOW! 


CHAR** 

pHtSONWtt 


Or 


MW*** 


WEAR WITHOUT BUYING! 


NEW YORK MAIL ORDER HOUSE, Dept. G-7-B 
13 ASTOR PLACE. NEW YORK 3, N. Y. 

Rush to me in plain wrapper the “SLEND-R-FORM” 
Girdle Supporter plus the FREE Book “CHARM AND 
PERSONALITY”. I will pay postman on delivery $2.98 
plus postage. If not completely satisfied in 10 days 
I may return merchandise and get my money back. 

□ HIP SIZE. □ WAIST SIZE. 

NAME. 

ADDRESS. 

CITY & ZONE. STATE. 

□ Check here if you wish to save postage by enclosing 
$2.98 with the coupon. 


99 






















































100 


BLONDES! 


DARK ROOTS Disappear 
- INSTANTLY 1 


I NSTANTLY you may lighten your 
hair . . . make dark roots disappear! 

You can be a glittering, glamorous 
blonde in a few minutes! Lechler’s 
“569” INSTANT HAIR LIGHTENER 
gives you greater lightening in less 
time. Just apply a delightful cream and watch its in¬ 
stant lightening action. Easy, quick! Leaves hair more 
blonde, more lovely than you’ve ever seen it. Lightens 
scalp, too! With Lechler’s “569” INSTANT HAIR 
LIGHTENER, it is not necessary to add a single drop 
of liquid peroxide! And you use it in the privacy of your 
own home.) Avoid waiting with bleaching paste on your 
head. Used by millions of women for over 25 years. 
FREE 36-page Booklet for Blondes with your order. 
Sent C.O.D. in plain wrapper for SI.20 (tax included) 
plus postage. We pay postage if you send money with 
order. Mail this “ad” with your name and address to 
HOUSE OF LECHLER, Dept. H-412, 560 BROADWAY, 
NEW YORK 12, N. Y. 



BABY SHOES 

PRESERVED FOREVER 



by Amazing New Process 


^^ow^sJ^Pr^es^ri^n 

This offer GUARANTEED to be best 
of its kind in U. S. or your money 
cheerfully refunded! We preserve 
everlastingly in gleaming velvet-tone 
bronze metallic-finish your leather, silk 
or cloth baby shoes. We preserve each 
wrinkle, each scuff I In addition, 

FREE of extra charge, by a marvelous 
process, we fill your baby shoes with a special composition. 
This makes shoes “stay put” on radio, mantel, table, etc. 
Only $1.49 for one shoe, or $1.98 for TWO shoes. SEND 
NO MONEY now! Either mail shoes today or write for 
free mailing container. When your shoes arrive, pay your 
mailman. Or, for more details, send postcard. 



Everlasting Baby Shoes. Dept. 431 -B, Topeka, Kansas 



grance of 5 different expensive 
perfumes! FIVE generous sam¬ 
ple-size vials only 25c plus 5c tax, 
30c postpaid! Find the perfume 
which best enhances your person¬ 
ality. Or, SPECIAL I For SI 
(plus 20c tax) we send 4 sample 
sets (20 vials) and include FREE 
of extra charge, full-size bottle 
GOLDEN SHOWERS perfume! 
Money-back guarantee! 

H. U. RHODIUS 
1901 Perfume Bldg. 

San Antonio 6, Texas 




Introductory Offer: 

Buy ONE —15c 
Get ONE FREE 


All the latest STARS & 
POSES 


rorr List decorated EDEE 
rnLC with MOVIE I I'LL 
STARS mailed with each 
order. 


Send names of TWO FAVOR¬ 
ITES with Fifteen Cents or 
$1.00 for 20 different photos. 

HOLLYWOOD ITEMS CO. 
Drawer 1151 Dept. A-3 
Hollywood 28. Calif., U.S.A. 




It’s easy to make any article 
brilliantly in the dark with this 
modern, ready-to-use Luminous 
Lacquer. Simply apply the lacquer 
with a brush. Dries in a jiffy and is 
perfectly harmless. Ideal for hun¬ 
dreds of practical household uses. 
And you can make extra money in 
your spare time—by selling jewelry, 
artificial flowers, toys, pictures, re¬ 
ligious articles, etc., which you have 
painted with this luminous lacquer. 
Children and grownups go for them 
in a big way! Generous bottle will 
be sent to you postpaid on receipt 
of $1. Money back guarantee. 

LUMINOUS PRODUCTS COMPANY 
3 W. 42 St., New York 18, N. Y., Dept. 72 


LIGHT CORDS 

8z 

HOUSE I 

NUMBERS 

• 

ORNAMENTAL 



ahead for RatofFs erstwhile bete noir. 

Certain quarters of late would have 
you believe that Glenn’s career has 
a Cinderella quality about it, but that’s 
plain poppycock; no fairy godmother 
waved a wand and turned him into a 
success overnight. He has, rather, been 
bounced up, down and around so 
much in the 28 years of his life as to 
make quite logical a prenatal concern 
with roller coasters on the part of his 
mother. And except for unusual guts, 
coupled with a chronic sense of hum¬ 
or, he wouldn’t be on top now. 

Along about the time he got fired as 
a doorman, for instance, he got a part 
time job checking hats and washing 
dishes at Masonic Temple meetings 
and banquets in Hollywood. One night 
his wife Lucille, whom he always calls 
Lou, admonished him to bring home 
th ' wherewithal—bread and milk— 
for their dinner. Unexpectedly the 
Masons failed to pay him his $2.00 in 
cash that night (they always mailed 
checks the next day, it seems) which 
meant he had no money for bread 
and milk. Stymied but not stumped, 
he gathered the beat-up flowers from 
the deserted banquet table and car¬ 
ried them home. With an elaborate 
bow he presented them to Lou. 

“Here, my darling, is food for your 
soul,” he explained. “Unfortunately 
we’re fresh out of bread and milk!” 

It was a funny gag, but they were 
still hungry. They remember that too. 

Glenn did not start out in life to be 
an actor. That idea, he says, was the 
brainchild of his mother who used to 
read poems at the regular Parent- 
Teachers association meetings. The 
only career notion he harbored at an 
early age was to emulate his father, 
Thomas H. Langan (earlier Langans 
spelled it Lanagan) and be a fireman 
on the Denver Fire Department force, 
with a fine bass voice for quartet bal¬ 
lad singing. 

Born on July 8, 1917, in the Denver, 
Colo, suburb of Berkeley Gardens, 
Glenn grew up pretty much as the 
average kid of his age. He played on 
the Wheatridge High school baseball 
and football teams (in one game he 
tore the cartilage in his knee, which 
later kept him from joining the army) 
and was an active member of the 
gang who haunted the Country Club 
Golf course to swipe balls which they 
sold back to members, an undertak¬ 
ing spiced with the delicious element 
of chance. 

To counteract this, and his marked 
indifference to his high school studies, 
Mrs. Langan sought to provide him 
an “Interest” by enrolling him in a 
radio school conducted by Arthur Guy 
Empey. Free tickets to the Herrick 
Drama School productions were given 
the radio school students, and Glenn 
thus discovered the world of the 
theater. Auditioned as a prospective 
student, he recited “The Shooting of 
Dan McGrew” so tellingly as to win 
a scholarship for the advanced course 
in drama. In 1934 he was playing bit 
parts with the famous Elitch Gardens 
stock company, and in 1935 he became 
assistant stage manager for that or¬ 
ganization. 

“I was a cocky 18, and thought I 
had the world by the tail!” Glenn re¬ 
called. “So I set out for The Big Time 
—New York!” 

His total assets, financially speaking, 
amounted to $77. He spent $50 for his 
railroad ticket, blithely confident the 
remaining $27 would suffice until he 
had captured Broadway. The train 
was an hour late leaving Denver, how¬ 
ever, and in that hour he got involved 



mwviTIV tiny pocket size 

NEW RADIO! 


Slips in your pocket or purse—Wt. 
^Jon/y S 02 $.! Complete READY TO 
PLAY as shown with self contained 
phone for personal use. Beautiful black 
silver plastic case. Has patented fixed 
Crystal-Slide Tuning Dial! NO TUBES. 

batteries, or electric plug 

IN REQUIRED. USUALLY RE¬ 
CEIVES LOCAL BROADCASTS with¬ 
out outside aerial wires. 

GUARANTEED TO WORK 

when connected and used according to 
instructions or your money back. 10- 
day trial. Can be used in homes, offices, hotels, cabins, in bed after 
hours, etc. 


s.„J finlu Cl00 (cash, money order, check) and pay post- 
OCIIU Vlllj d*_ man $2.99 plus delivery fees on arrival or 
send $3.99 for postpaid delivery. IDEAL GIFT FOR CHILDREN 
OR ADULTS ALIKE! Get your PA-KETTE RADIO NOW for 
real enjoyment. Dealers in most cities. 

PA-KETTE. ELECTRIC CO., Dept. HW-2, Kearney, Neb. 


FREE ENLARGEMENT 

I Km mm ■■ Just to get acquainted with 
new customers, we will beautifully enlarge 
your favorite print or negative, photo or pic¬ 
ture to 8x10 inches — FREE — if you enclose 
this ad. (Pictures should be clear and sharp; 
negatives give best results). Information on 
hand tinting in natural colors sent immediate¬ 
ly. Your original returned with your free en¬ 
largement. Send today. Limit 1 to a customer. 

Good only in the United States 
GEPPERT STUDIOS. Dept. 221. Des Moines 2. Iowa 



Man a Prospect. Smartest 
color and style combined with 
warm snug comfort. Genuine 
ALL WOOL Buffalo Check Shirt, fall 
cut, patented storm cuffs. Ama 2 inglylow 
priced, with generous profit for you. 

COM PLETE LINE 

Leather and wool jackets, raincoats. 200 
fast-selling shoe styles. Our salesmen 
making biggest profits using Actual Sam¬ 
ples we furnish FREE. Write TODAY! 

CONSOLIDATED SHO 
Dept. S-144 Chippewa Falls, 


Wisconsin 


LEARN 

MILLINERY 

AT HOME 

Design and make exclusive hats 
under personal direction of one 
of America’s noted designers. 
Complete materials, blocks, etc., furnished. Every 
step illustrated. You make exclusive salable hats 
right from the start. We teach ^ou how to start a 
profitable business in spare time. Low cost and easy 
terms. Expert milliners are in demand. Free 
National Placement Dept. Send for free catalog. 

LOUIE MILLER SCHOOL OK MILLINERY 
225 N. Wabash Ave., Dept. 42 Chicago I, III. 



rnrr /r x 7 hand colored 

rKtt photo EHIARGMENT 


As an INTRODUCTORY OFFER 
we will send you a beautiful 
HAND COLORED Professional 
Enlargement FREE with your 
order of six BLACK & WHITE 
ENLARGEMENTS. Six 5x7 for 
S2.04 or six 8x10 enlargements 
for $2.64. Single enlargement 
5x7 costs 39c or 8x10 49c. Mail 
your photo, snapshot or negative 
(any size) mother, father, sister, 
soldier, group pictures, etc. Your 
original will be returned un¬ 
harmed. State color of eyes, 
hair, and clothing. Mail Money Order or War 
Stamps, or pay postman on arrival plus a few cents 
postage. 

MAX CHINKES, Photographer (Dept. H) 
1697 Broadway New York 19, N. Y. 




FREE! 700 Yds. Thread! 

Large colorful pieces. 3 lbs. (18 to 
22 yds.) only $1.49 plus postage. Sent 
C.O.D. on Money-back guarantee. 

FREE! EXTRA! Seven hundred 
(700) yds. good white ft50 thread 
FREE and 16 lovely quilt patterns 
all sent free to anyone. If not per¬ 
fectly satisfied, just return quilt 
pieces (keeping free sewing thread 
and free quilt patterns for your trou¬ 
ble) and we will refund your $1.49 plus 
postage spent BOTH ways! You be the 
judge. You can’t lose. Could anything be 
more fair? Compare our offer and liberal 
guarantee with others. SEND NO MONEY! 
Just mail a card TODAY! Act NOW! 
REMNANT SHOP, Box 426-B, 


free: 


SESSER, ILLINOIS 









































GET SUIT 

NO MONEY TO PAY! 


Big Earnings in Spare Time Too! 


Act at once! We offer you brand new 
latest style made-to-measure suit for per¬ 
sonal wear, just for taking a few orders 
from friends. Also opportunity to earn 
CASH PROFITS in spare time. 
>ur suit will help you take more orders 
ith huge selection of rich, quality 
fabrics, tailored-to-measure in newest 
styles at sensationally LOW 
PRICES all men can afford. Also 
Ladies’ Tailored Suits—complete 
line. Sensational values! 
Money-back guarantee. Don’t 
miss this opportunity! 

No Experience Needed 

No house-to-houoe canvassing. 
No money needed. Amazing 
Personal Suit offer and order¬ 
getting plans help you earn 
good money—easy. Don't wait! 

WRITE FOR FREE SAMPLES! y&SflSKffiEJ&'.SK 

samples, money making plans, and Personal SUIT OFFER. For quick 
action tell us about yourself—age. etc. Write todav. J. C. FIELD & SON, 
Harrison & Throop Sts., Dept. B-1611, Chicago 7, III. 


Hollywood BEAU-CATCHERS 


Only $1.50 
Postpaid 


Watch the expression on 
your friends faces when 
you wear these exotic, 
gaily colored Sequined 
Horse Hair Earrings with 
Plastic back. They are 
the talk of Hollywood. 

Made in 6 colors. Aqua. 

Powder, Red, Black. 

White and Yellow. Priced 
unbelievably low — only 
$1.50 postpaid. If not de¬ 
lighted, return within 5 
days and full refund will be made. Order your favorite 
color today for yourself or as a gift. 

Unique Accessories, Dept. A-10, 4618 Hollywood Blvd. 

Hollywood 27, Calif. 



NEW CHEMICAL MITT 

Sensational! DRY Window Cleaner! Uses'®* 5 ® no water.no 
l messy liquids. Chemically Treated. Simply glide over win- 
I dows: leaves glass sparkling clear. No heating water, no 
heavy backets to carry. No rags, powders, sponges, cham- 
o mess or muss. No red chapped hands. Dust, dirt, grime, 
•ear like magic. Wonderful for auto windows, windshields / 


SAMPLES FOR AGENTS 

mediately to all who 

send name at once. A penny postal will do. SEND NO MONEY— 
just your name KRISTEE CO., 592 Bar Street, AKRON. OHIO 


TRAIN 



not with singing lessons— but by sound, sci¬ 
entifically correct silent and vocal exercises, 
and absolutely guarantee complete satisfaction 
with results. Write for Voice Book, FREE. Sent to no 
one under 17 years old unless signed by parent. 

PERFECT VOICE INSTITUTE, Studio 6342, Kimball Hall Bldg., Chicago 4. III. 



LOW 


FREE CATALOG 


Buy direct from one of the 


_^_most reliable wholesale fur 

organizations. The latest styles, quality 
furs. Sizes 10 to 46, In a wide selection 
to choose from: Silver Foxes, Muskrats, 
Skunks, Ponies, Kidskins, Raccoons, 
Coneys. Plus Many Other Furs. Satis¬ 
faction guaranteed or money refunded. 
Send for free catalog! 

H. M. J. FUR CO. 

150 -T W. 28 St., Now York 1, N. Y. 



Free for Asthma 
During Winter 

If you suffer with those terrible attacks of 
Asthma when it is cold and damp; if raw, 
Wintry winds make you choke as if each gasp 
for breath was the very last; if restful sleep is 
impossible because of the struggle to breathe; 
if vou feel the disease is slowly wearing your 
life away, don’t fail to send at once to the 
Frontier Asthma Co., for a free trial of a re¬ 
markable method. No matter where you live or 
whether you have any faith in any remedy 
under the Sun, send for this free trial. If you 
have suffered for a lifetime and tried every¬ 
thing you could learn of without relief; even 
if you are utterly discouraged, do not abandon 
hope but send today for this free trial. It will 
cost you nothing. Address 

Frontier Asthma Co. 635-S Frontier Bldg. 
462 Niagara Street Buffalo 1, New York 


in a crap game in the station basement 
with a couple of Red Caps who had 
been schoolmates. Train time found 
him flat broke, but he solved the 
dilemma by cashing his ticket and 
buying bus fare in its place. Thus he 
arrived in New York with $3.80 in 
his pockets. 

1936 was a year of breadlines in 
New York, as elsewhere, but G^nn 
met the immediate eating problem by 
washing dishes for his meals at the 
Automat. His 50c a night lodging at 
the YMCA was paid from his salary 
from the Shubert theater; a friend, 
Lucien Self, managed to get him a 
walk-on part in “Swing Your Lady” 
for which he was paid $1.00 a per¬ 
formance. 

One morning Glenn awoke in sur¬ 
prise to find himself in the Polyclinic 
Hospital. En route to the theater the 
night before he had fainted at the 
corner of Broadway and 45th. The 
cause, doctors said, was malnutrition, 
the polite word for starvation! 

In a sense this proved to be the 
turning point in Glenn’s life and 
career. En route home from a week’s 
fattening-up at the hospital to his 
cheaper ($2.00 a week) room he had 
taken in a tenement house, Glenn met 
a young man on the subway. The 
young man, Glen Fielding by name, 
was even taller than Glenn’s 6 ft. 4 in. 
and was a doorman at Roxy’s Theater 
Roxy’s demanded impressive height in 
their doormen, he said, so perhaps he 
might wangle a similar job for Lan- 
gan. Also mentioned by Fielding was 
the fact he was in love with a beauti¬ 
ful showgirl at that theater. 

The doorman job failed to material¬ 
ize, but the two Glens remained good 
friends* even after Langan swiped 
Fielding’s dream girl from under his 
very nose! 

That happened by accident. At least 
the start of it did. One day Fielding 
suggested to the girl, Lucille Weston, 
that instead of lunching as they had 
planned, they take some food to share 
with Langan in his room as a surprise. 
The unexpected visit, incidentally, 
caught Glenn extremely short; when 
he was walked in on, he recalled, he 
was badly in need of a shave, and was 
clad only in a pair of shorts while 
doing the family wash in an under¬ 
sized basin. 



Dead-pan singer-actress Virginia O'Brien and 
her four months old daughter, Teresa. Ginny 
has good part in "The Harvey Girls" (M-G-M). 



**YOUR FIGURE 

Quickly, Safely, at Home 

Shy? Embarrassed? Self-conscious due to shape¬ 
less, unappealing body lines? Now, learn to 
develop thrilling curves, an alluring bustline 
... right in your own home! Make yourself 
attractive, vivacious—develop yourself into a 
glamorous, glorious personality. It’s amazingly 
easy with the aid of the Bonomo Home Course 
on Bust Culture. What a joy to know that 
you’re popular, admired! Let this self-improve¬ 
ment course help you achieve new loveliness 
right in the privacy of your home. 

"I was so Undeveloped, 

Unattractive, Lonesome 99 

WRITES ANN YAGER of ELLWOOD CITY, PA. 



BEFORE 


AFTER 


Ann Yager’s shapeless body 
caused great unhappiness and 
misery. Then Ann tried the 
Bonomo Home Course on Bust 
Culture. Now, she's a new, 
enticing . . . popular girl. 

SIND NO MONIY 

You, too, may gain great bene¬ 
fits from this unusual course. 
It was prepared by Mr. Joe 
Bonomo, famed beauty authority 
and guide to many of Holly- 
w'ood's loveliest stars. Fill m 
and mail coupon now. If you 
are not satisfied, return course in 
10 days for full purchase price 
refund. Course sent in unmarked 
wrapper. 



JOB BONOMO 

world famous beauty 
authority and pub¬ 
lisher of "Beautify 
Your Figure," your 
Guide to Grace, 
Beauty and Charm 
. . . at all news¬ 
stands. 


— MAIL COUPON TODAY — 

Joe Bonomo, Personal 

BONOMO CULTURE INSTITUTE, Dept. B-222 
1841 Broadway, New York 23, N. Y. 

Please rush your complete Home Course on Bust Culture 
in unmarked wrapper. I'll pay postman $1.97 plus postage 
on delivery. If not satisfied, I may return it within 10 
days and get znj purchase price back. 


Name. 

Address. 


pTease"Print Plainl"y" 


City....Zone.State.. 

□ Check here if you enclose $1.97 for delivery postpaid. 
(Canadian & Foreign, $2.50 cash with order) 


101 




























102 


SHOWER OFF 
UNWANTED 
HAIR! 

New Liquid Creom 
Works Like Magic 

ABSOLUTELY ODORLESS! 

Make your body as free of hair as a 
new-born babe’s! Wash away unwanted 
hair from face, under arms, legs or 
any part of your body with MOORISH CREAMY LIQUID 
DEPILATORY. NOT A POWDER! ABSOLUTELY ODOR¬ 
LESS! Just apply—wait a few moments—let it dry then 
shower off. Removes hair completely, without razor nicks, 
burns or irritations. Leaves no stubby regrowth. 

MAKE THIS "MAGNIFYING GLASS TEST" 

After using this unusual Liquid Hair 
Remover, look at your skin through 
any powerful magnifying glass. See 
how satin-smooth your skin is. You’ll 
never believe that any hair grew 
there before! Send for MOORISH 
CREAMY LIQUID DEPILATORY today 
ABSOLUTELY ODORLESS. Large 6 oz. 
bottle only $1.50. Sent in plain wrap¬ 
per. Send $1.50, plus 30c tax with 
this ad”. We pay postage. Or C.O.D., 
for $1.50 plus tax and postage. 

HOUSE OF LECHLER. Dept. M-412, 

560 BROADWAY. NEW YORK 12, N. Y. 


HOUSE 



B® tt 



WRIT £ 


BEAUTIFY CONTOURS, 
EASILY, QUICKLY! 

New, lovely proportions for your 
legs: hips, thighs, calves, ankles, 
etc.—in this healthful, new, as¬ 
tonishingly easy way. Only a few 
minutes per day in your own home. 

EFFECTIVE, LASTING RESULTS! 

Used successfully by hundreds 
of smart women everywhere. 

FOR FREE LITERATURE TODAY! 


Surprise everyone: get started now, without obligation, 
by mailing coupon immediately to 


ADRIENNE 

915 SHREVE BLDG Salon Q. SAN FRANCISCO,8, CAL 

NAME... 

ADDRESS. 

CITY.STATE. 


TOMBSTONES 


DIRECT TO YOU $Q95 

Genuine Beautiful Rockdale 
Monuments, Markers. Satis- p.eJ, 
faction or MONEY BACK. £ ■ 
Freight paid. Write for our Terms 
FREE Catalog and compare prices. 

ROCKDALE MONUMENT CO. 

Dept. 724 JOLIET 



ILLINOIS 



and Men, 18 to 50 

Iassage graduates make $50, 
more per week. Large full time 
doctors, hospitals, sanatori- 
or private practice. Others make 
good money in spare time. You can 
win Independence and prepare for 
future security by training at 
home and qualifying for Diploma. 
Anatomy Charts and 32-page 
Illustrated Book FREE—now! 

THE College of Swedish Massage 
Dpt. 641-B, 100 E. Ohio St..Chicago 11 


PROFESSIONAL 

ENLARGEMENT 



ist to get acquainted we will send 
iu a beautiful 5x7 inch professional 
ilargement made from your favorite 
apshot. picture, print or negative, 
actically FREE! All we ask is 3c 
r handling and mailing. This is a 
nuine introductory offer by one of the most reliable 
udios in the U. S.—over a million satisfied customers 1 
) receive your beautiful enlargement send snapshot, 
cture, print or negative (negative pre- - 
rred) with this ad. Your enlargement 
turned together with your picture. 

Ter limited. Rush your order NOW! 


senu Biiapsnui, 

nm 


FREE! EXTRA SPECIAL! Promptly upon 
receipt of your picture, print or negative, 
we’ll send—by return mail—a marvelous 
photo folder which accommodates 8 snap¬ 
shots! Supply limited. Act TODAY! 

AMERICAN STUDIOS, Box 216, LaCrosse, Wis. 


Photo 

Folder 


One look, nevertheless, and Glenn 
and Lucille knew they were hopelessly 
in love! Neither did much about it at 
first. Lou wangled the doorman job 
Glenn needed and sat back, ladylike, 
to await developments. But Glenn too 
held his tongue; it wasn’t exactly 
easy, he said, to inform Fielding, 
“Sorry, old man, but I’m in love with 
your girl!” Thus a full 18 months 
passed. 

Eventually they were married, once 
in Tia Juana, Mexico, in 1938, and a 
second time at Lou’s home in the Cat- 
skills in 1940 when they discovered 
New York did not recognize Tia Juana 
marriages. Much has happened be¬ 
tween then and now, but throughout 
all their ups and downs which have 
taken them from near-poverty in a 
drab rooming house to the present 
luxury of their rambling home and 
lovely gardens in San Fernando valley, 
their devotion has never wavered. 

“Those two,” a friend recently said 
of them, “restore one’s faith in life 
and love.” 

In 1937 Glenn returned to Elitch 
Gardens in Colorado, this time as full 
stage manager. For his $25 a week 
salary he also played small parts when 
the occasion demanded. Thus he was 
seen in “Ceiling Zero” by the Selz- 
nick casting agent, Max Arno, and 
offered a test for the role of Ashley 
Wilkes (later played by Leslie How¬ 
ard) in the forthcoming super-duper, 
“Gone With The Wind.” Hotfooting it 
to Hollywood, he made the test which 
he admits turned out slightly more 
than smelly. A few weeks later he 
bounced Ratoff out of the Chinese 
Theater. 

“Obviously I had not learned the 
secret of how to get ahead in Holly¬ 
wood,” Glenn related. “Therefore I 
took steps.” 

The first was to enroll in the Henry 
Duffy Dramatic school where he was 
given a scholarship and $1.00 a day 
for sweeping up and sundry other 
odds and ends of jobs. Augmented by 
the part time job at the Masonic Tem¬ 
ple, already mentioned, it was a poor 
one but a “living.” The second step 
was to marry Lou, to ease the hunger 
in his heart and give him fresh in¬ 
spiration. 

“And long enough I’d had to wait 
for him, too!” Lou is reported to have 
complained. “I thought the dope would 
never ask me!” 

After appearing in 37 Duffy pro¬ 
ductions on a little theater basis, 
Glenn signed a stock contract at War¬ 
ner Brothers. Exactly nothing hap¬ 
pened there, and justifiably so, Glenn 
admits; he was so thin, he said, he 
photographed like “two eyes and a 
nose looking at you.” At the end of 
26 weeks he took a job as stage man¬ 
ager for a company playing “White 
Cargo” in San Francisco, while Lou 
worked in a show at the World’s Fair. 
Between them they saved $475 which 
they promptly invested in the show 
scheduled to follow “White Cargo.” 
Just as promptly the show flopped, 
and the Langans were flat broke again. 
Back to Hollywood they came where 
Glenn luckily got a job at $35 a week 
with the Noel Langley Group Theater. 

For a change, his luck held. Charles 
Coburn saw him and engaged him for 
the lead in his outdoor drama festival 
that summer in Schenectady. To save 
money, Glenn and Lou piled them¬ 
selves, their dog Chico, and 7 trunks 
in a 1932 Ford and headed East. 

“Talk about miracles!” Glenn ex¬ 
claimed. “We drove the whole 3000 
I miles to Lou’s home without a single 


DEAF? 

HARD OF HEARING? 

HEAD NOISES? Try this simple home 
treatment. It has helped a great many 
who suffered due to catarrh of the head. 
Many folks past 70 report hearing fine, and 
head noises gone. Nothing to wear—no 
one need know. Write today for proof 
and 30 days trial offer. No obligation. 

THE ELMO COMPANY, DEPT. 635, Davenport, Iowa 


wm, 


WATCH THE DANGER AREAS 



Little tell-tale wrinkles often appear 
in the danger areas where the skin 
is thinnest, as around the eyes, 
mouth, and throat . . . especially when 
the skin is deficient in natural oils. To 
help lubricate the skin and make those 
little tell-tale wrinkles temporarily less 
apparent, use the new improved ESTROBALM 
with massage. Makes the skin appear softer, smoother, 
more youthful. Contains real Turtle Oil with the new 
scientific discovery Estrogenic Hormones and other in¬ 
gredients readily absorbed by the skin, and recognized by 
many beauty experts as excellent skin aids. No wonder 
thousands of happy users throughout the country recommend 
Estrobalm. Order Estrobalm today. Complete with In¬ 
struction Booklet, 2-oz. jar $2.00. 6-oz. jar $5.00. 1-pound 
jar $10.00. (Postage additional on C.O.D. orders.) Satis- 
faction guaranteed or purchase price refunded. 

VITAMIN SALES CO. 

79 De Kalb Ave., Dept. 611-B, Brooklyn 1, N. Y. 


BE A NURSE —Study at Home 


Earn while learning—Opportunities every¬ 
where. Big post-war demand—Big Salaries. 
Easy lessons followed by 6 months 

FREE HOSPITAL TRAINING 

(optional) High school not necessary. No 
age limit. Send for FREE ‘‘Nursing Facts” 
and sample lesson pages. Act now! 

POST GRADUATE HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Dept. B. 158 N. Wacker Drive 
Chicago 6, Illinois 



Aiw and Sauitifad 

FT 


l/ILTPIECES 


pt 

BARGAIN!! Beautiful prints, 
checks,stripes,solids. Fast colors. 
ALL N EW! Illustrated designs 
and patterns included toith 
order. Only $1.39 plus postage. 
Sent COD. Send NO MONEY. 
Just a penny postcard or letter. If not 
satisfied, return package anJ your 
$1.39 will be refunded. Order Today. 

THE COLONIAL SHOP 
Dept. T-300 Zeigler, Illinois 



PHOTOS" 


MOVIE STARS 
PINUP GALS 


25c Each ... 5 for $1 


We have them all. Actual origi¬ 
nal glossy photos. Size 8 x 10. 
Also scenes from all recent film. 
We have the largest and finest 
stock—acclaimed by fans as the 
best. Your first order will con¬ 
vince you. Remit by M. O or 


U. S. stamps. 

(FREE Star & Pin Up Folder with order) 

BRAM STUDIO (672) 

306 West 44th St. New York 18. N. Y. 



CONFIDENTIAL 

For Movie Fans! 

The private home addresses of 
more than 400 top Hollywood 
motion picture stars in this ex¬ 
clusive directory. Send for it now! 
Enclose $1 in currency or money 
order. 

Movie Star Directory 
P. O. Box 3068-D 
Hollywood (28), Calif. 

























































Yes, for 77 years, Dr. Guild’s 
GREEN MOUNTAIN ASTH¬ 
MATIC COMPOUND has been 
the choice of thousands for reliev¬ 
ing the miseries of asthmatic attacks. 
Why not try this trusted asthmatic 
aid yourself? Cigarettes, 50e. Powder, 
25* and $1.00 at nearly all drug 
stores. If your dealer cannot supply 
you,order direct. Use only as directed. 

For FREE SAMPLE, write 
J.H.GuildCo.. Dept. H-20, Rupert,Vt. 


YOUR LEGS CAN’T BE LOVELY! 


MENDING 


IF YOUR 
HOSE NEED 

The ELITE Needle 

DOES THE TRICK 
DON’T THROW THOSE NICE 
STOCKINGS AWAY! MEND ’EM! 
By using the ELITE Run Needle and 
Snag Needle, you can save many 
dollars’ worth of hose and keep your 
legs looking trim and neat. You’ll save 
more than the price of the needles the 
first pair you mend. Either of these 
needles with full instructions 
sent C.O.D. plus postage (in 
U.S. A.) for_.. 

THE ELITE SYSTEM 
Uk- 1 605 Burkbumett Bldg., Ft. Worth 2, Tex. 



I 


YOUR PHOTO$ 

On 100 Stamps 

New! Your favorite photo or snapshot 
reproduced on exclusive smart stamps 
on fine gummed paper. Just wet back 
and apply. 

Hundreds of Novel uses. Photo 
Stamps can be used on Greeting Cards. 

Books. Letters, Job applications. Rec¬ 
ords. etc. Original photo returned. Send 
$1.00 with photo today! No C.O.D.'s. 

MERCHANTS STUDIO. 2815 Glenview Rd„ Dept. H-1, Wilmette. Ill; 



LINCOLN AND INDIAN HEAD 

PENNIES WANTED 


WILL 

PAY 


*10°° EACH 


FOR CERTAIN 
LINCOLN PENNIES 


Indian Head Cents $50.00; Nickels $500.00; Dimes 
$1,000.00. All rare coins, bills, stamps wanted. Send 
10c for Illustrated Catalogue and other information. 

Federal Coin Exchange, 1-HWG, Columbus 5, Ohio 


WOMEN 

HU** 4 * 

With Form 

Tailored 

llHClW* 


%or e FREE outfit 


Women go wild about “Form-Tailored” 
Lingerie—new, glamorous styling, new 
kind of fitting, high quality- workman¬ 
ship. Low prices bring quick orders. 
Also fine hosiery, girdles and underwear 
for the whole family. If you want 
money, full or spare time, write today 
for complete, beautiful, illustrated 
Style Equipment—sent ABSOLUTELY 
FREE. 

WORLD’S STAR-MALLOCH 
Dept. N-14 Grand Rapids, Mich. 


High School Course 

at Home 


^Many Finish in 2 Years 

Go as rapidly as your time and abilities permit. Course 
equivalent to resident school work—prepares for college 
entrance exams. Standard H.S. texts suppled. Diploma- 

Credit for H. S. subjects already completed. Single subjects if d«£ 
sired. High school education is yeryjmj^ortaiit tor ad*»°cemen in 
business and industry and socially. Don t be hand'c^P^ed a! yoar 
life. Be a High School graduate. Start your training now. rr-ee 

L Bulletin on request. No obligation. 

American School, De pt. H-271, Drtxel at 58th, Chicago 37 


SIZE B xlO" 

Here's an opportunity to 
get the loveliest, most 
exciting ENLARGE- 
MENT you’ve ever seen 
of your favorite snap¬ 
shot. Created by ex- 
lerts, this real profes¬ 
sional Enlargement will 
thrill you and give you a 
large picture that you II 
treasure all your life. 

SEND NO MONEY -- 

pact cypviCE Mail ANY SIZE snapshot, photo, or negative 

.* i»om, Mg-ssfissifissf 

YOUR^PHOTO D RE'Pu’rNEd' SniKrMEd” 
EsuRGEMENT Xothing else to buy. Mail photo NOW ± or l £? 
m?.t beautiful and exciting Enlargement.you y ever seen. Special 
Oil coloring SI.00 extra per person. Specify colors. 

allied photo CO. 




.08 W. Lake St.. 


Dept. B-l, 


Chicago 1. III. 


mishap, but the next morning when 
we looked at the car it had 3 flat tires, 
and the engine wouldn't even turn 
over. Lou was planning to stay with 
her folks anyway, so I sold the wreck 
for $50, which got me nicely to 
Schenectady." 

During the festival, Brock Pember¬ 
ton saw Glenn and offered him the 
romantic lead in “Glamour Preferred" 
which opened on Broadway late in 
1940. It was a fair enough play and 
might have succeeded had it not been 
the fourth play about Hollywood to 
open that season in New York. Its 
run, therefore, was brief and when it 
closed, Glenn landed in the highly 
successful “Johnny Belinda" starring 
Helen Craig. He started as an under¬ 
study, but at the play's closing, 10 
months later, he had played in turn 
the romantic lead of the doctor, the 
“heavy" with leanings toward rape, 
and the 67-year old father! He stepped 
into the latter role with only 24 hours 
to learn 87 sides of dialogue when the 
veteran character actor who regularly 
played it was taken ill. 

Paramount's Mitchell Leisen caught 
“Belinda," was impressed with Glenn’s 
ability, size and good looks (gray eyes, 
dark blond hair, and clean-cut, regular 
features which you have seen in many 
a Vogue fashion ad without recogniz¬ 
ing them perhaps), and-offered him 
the famous “hunk of man" role in 
“Lady In The Dark." Jon Hall was 
supposed to play it, but Jon was due 
to go in the army. Then Jon didn't go 
in the army, so Glenn didn’t play the 
role. He didn’t play any role, in fact, 
for 20 long weeks. Finally, near the 
end of his contract, Paramount cast 
him in “Riding High" with Dotty La- 
mour. Discouraged, Glenn was about 
to return to New York when Fox, ex¬ 
cited as all get-out, talked him into 
a contract and sticking with Holly¬ 
wood. 

Come to think of it, maybe Glenn 
is a Cinderella of sorts. Or maybe it’s 
just another of his famous hunches 
working out. Either way, a recent 
event is rather amazing. It happened 
this way: 

Lou and Glenn live rather quietly 
on the whole. Night clubs see them 
but rarely, and not only have they 
given up big party giving in favor of 
small gatherings of their intimate 
friends like Bill Eythe and Kurt 
Kreuger, but they actually know their 
neighbors. One such neighbor, un¬ 
known in the movie world, proposed 
to Glenn that he play the lead in a 
radio show he was in the process of 
dreaming up. 

At first Glenn demurred. He had 
done no radio work in his life, he 
pointed out. Besides, he had been of¬ 
fered the lead in the new Florence 
Ryerson-Colin Clements play on 
Broadway, and Fox was anxious that 
he accept, whereas the radio thing 
still was uncertainly in the formative 


tage. . 

The neighbor kept talking, and 
jmehow Glenn kept listening. Today, 
s result, he is the star of the new 
jast-to-coast thriller, “Murder Is My 
[obby,” heard every Sunday over 
lutual. What’s more, he is one of the 
xclusive circle of eight Hollywood 
>ading men who star regularly on 
leir own radio shows. The other 
wen include Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, 
ack Benny, Orson Welles, Bill Ben- 
ix, Jack Carson and Jack Haley, no 
iSS. 

Pretty fast company, that, for a 

a vice! m _ 

The End 



Sells First Stories After 
Two Months' Training, Now 
Averages $600 Yearly 

“Began selling feature stories In 
my second month of training. Al¬ 
though I can find time for only 
part time writing. I average 
about $600 yearly from this 
hobby. I know any person with 
ordinary ability who really and 
sincerely desires, can learn to 
write and sell with N.I.A. train¬ 
ing."—Mrs. Mae L. Harland. 74 
No. Union St., Mauston, Wis¬ 
consin. 


Why Can’t 
You Write? 


It’s much simpler 
than you think! 

S O many people with the “germ” of writ¬ 
ing in them simply can’t get started. They 
suffer from inertia. Or they set up imagi¬ 
nary barriers to taking the first step. 

Many are convinced the field is confined 
to persons gifted with a genius for writing. 

Few realize that the great bulk of commer¬ 
cial writing is done by so-called “unknowns.” 
Not only do these thousands of men and wo¬ 
men produce most of the fiction published, 
but countless articles on business, hobbies, 
social matters, fashions, human interest 
stories, local and club activities, as well. 

Such material is in constant demand. Every 
week thousands of checks for $25, $50 and 
$100 go out to writers whose latent ability 
was perhaps no greater than yours. 

The Practical Method 


Newspaper work demonstrates that the 
vay to learn to write is by writing! News¬ 
paper copy desk editors waste no time on 
heories or ancient classics. The story is the 
hing. Every copy “cub” goes through the 
lourse of practical criticism—a training that 
urns out more successful authors than any 
>ther experience. 

That is why Newspaper Institute of Amer- 
ca bases its writing instruction on the Copy 
Desk Method. It starts and keeps you writ- 
ng in your own home, on your own time. 
\nd upon the very same kind of actual as¬ 
signments given daily to metropolitan re¬ 
porters. Thus you learn by doing , not by 
studying the individual styles of model 
mthors. 

Each week your work is analyzed construc- 
;ively by practical writers. Gradually they 
lelp to clarify your own distinctive style. 
Writing soon becomes 
>asy, absorbing. Profit- 
ble, too, as you gain 
lie “professional” 


.ouch that gets your 
material accepted by 
editors. Above all you 
can see constant prog¬ 
ress week by week as 
your faults are cor¬ 
rected and your writ¬ 
ing ability grows. 

Have You 
Natural Ability? 

Out Writing Aptitude Test 
will reveal whether or not 
you have natural talent lor 
writing. It will analyze your 
powers of observation, your 
imagination and dramatic 
instinct. You’ll enjoy taking 
this test. There is no cost 
or obligation. Simply mail 
the coupon below today. 
Newspaper Institute of 
America. One Park Avenue. 
New York 16. N. Y. (Founded 
1925.) 


NOTICE TO 
CANADIANS 

Newspaper Insti¬ 
tute’s operations 
in Canada have 
been approved by 
the Foreign Ex¬ 
change Control 
Board. To facili¬ 
tate all financial 
transactions, a 
special permit has 
been assigned to 
their account with 
The Canadian 
Bank of Com¬ 
merce, Montreal. 


Ne\ 


Newspaper Institute of America 
One Park Ave., New York 16, N. Y. 

Send me, without cost or obligation, 
your Writing Aptitude Test and further 
information about writing for profit as 
promised in Movieland, February. 


Mr 

Mrs 

Miss 


r • I 

rs. \ 
iss ) 


Address . 

(All correspondence confidential. 

call on you.) 


No salesman will 
49-B-596 


Copyiight 1946 Newspaper Institute of America 


103 






















































104 



GENUINE 

DIAMONDS 


SOLID 
GOLD 
FOR HIM: 

A Massive ring in 10-kt. SOLID YELLOW GOLD with 
liberal sized GENUINE DIAMOND. A regular $35.00 
value. Now you can own this rich SOLID GOLD 
ring with a GENUINE DIAMOND at our Introductory 
Price .$19.95 

FOR HER: 

A delicately designed, exquisitely beautiful ring that 
will attract admiring glances. A regular $25.00 value. 
This 3-DIAMOND chip Dinner Ring of unusual de¬ 
sign has a setting of 10-kt. SOLID YELLOW GOLD. 
Introductory Price.$14.95 


GUARANTEE: 

For your protection we give you a 5-day FREE TRIAL 
on either ring. If you are not thoroughly convinced that 
your ring is all we claim for it, return for refund of 
purchase price. NOTE: We pay all charges if you remit 
with order. NOTHING MORE TO PAY. (If C.O.D., 
postage and C.O.D. handling charges additional.) 
When ordering, send name, ring size, and item wanted. 
Remember, our money back guarantee protects you. 

FIFTH AVENUE JEWEL CO. 

545 Fifth Avenue, Dept. 102-B, New York 17, N. Y. 



Don’t Be Flat! 


YOU CAN HAVE A GLAMOROUS 


BUSTLINE —Instantly 



Symbol of love s 

HEART-SHAPED DOUBLE-SIDED 

PENDANTano CHAIN fi 


Give your loved one this exquisite 
designed hand-inscribed Symbol of Lm 
that expresses your most heartfelt got 
wishes. One side of this superb pendai 
r.% ar f „, e embossed raised inscripti< 
God Bless and Protect You". On tl 
other side, embossed on exquisite sim 
lated mother-of-pearl, is your choice 
the following inscriptions: “Love to IV 
Darling” “To My Sweetheart”. “Love 
Mother”. “Love to My Wife”. Both tt 
emblem and the chain are hand-made 
sparkling colorful highly polished Dur 
plast that can’t soil, fray, or tarnish. It 
new! It’s novel! It’s the most person 
way to express your true love. Hand ii 
scribed, so quantities are limited. Ord< 
yours now. Enclose $1.98 in full pa- 
ment. or order C.O.D. plus postage. Sta' 
inscription desired. GUARANTEED' 
not delighted, purchase price refunded. 

DEXTER HOUSE 

Dept. 27-AM 

37 East 19 St,, New York 3, N. Y. 


Flatter your figure -with PYRAMID SNAP-ONS. These 
dainty, lace-trimmed bust pads give you a lift where you 
need it most. They give you those well-developed, beau¬ 
tifully soft curves men admire—making you proud of your 
alluring, glamorous figure. Fit into the cup of any bras¬ 
siere. Just snap them on—they stay put. Wear them in 
complete comfort all day—they’re your own personal secret 
of charm and poise. No need to be embarrassed. Order 
PYRAMID SNAP-ONS by mail direct from us. Send $1.98 
in full payment (or order C.O.D. plus postage). Shipped 
promptly in plain wrapper. We GUARANTEE that you 
must be delighted with this new aid to instant allurement, 
or we will refund your money promptly. ARLESA MFG. CO., 
Dept B-2, Box 372, Church St. Annex Sta., N.Y. 8, N.Y. 


WOMEN WANTED 

You can make money supplying consumers 
with the well known Rawleigh Products. 
We supply stocks, equipment on credit; 
and teach you how. No experience needed 
to start. Over 200 easily sold home necessi¬ 
ties. Large repeat orders. Permanent, inde¬ 
pendent, dignified. Many women now mak¬ 
ing splendid income. Full or spare time. 

WRITE THE W. T. RAWLEIGH CO. 
Dept. B-90-HIL Freeport, III. 



(CONTINUED FROM RAGE 871 

its title from the incident that after 
Beethoven’s death, a love letter was 
found among his things addressed only 
to “My Immortal Beloved,” with no 
hint as to which of the eleven women 
in his life it referred to. For this pic¬ 
ture, Jose .Iturbi will again make 
piano recordings, and Bruno Walter 
will conduct the orchestral numbers. 

“Rhapsody in Blue,” with its rich 
presentation of George Gershwin’s 
music, had, of course, been made be¬ 
fore “Song to Remember,” though it 
was not released till considerably 
later. Two other pictures in this cate¬ 
gory are being made about modern 
composers—“Till the Clouds Roll By,” 
with Robert Walker playing Jerome 
Kern, and “Night and Day” with Cary 
Grant as Cole Porter. 

Producer-director George Waggner, 
in speaking of his plans for the 
Beethoven picture, commented, “Other 
similar pictures, with stories based on 
the lives of great composers and mu¬ 
sicians, are certain to follow because 
a large portion of our audiences really 
want them. But we realize that such 
films will be well received only as 
long as they are honest, with music 
an integral part of them; the musical 
portions cannot be dragged in by the 
heels and fitted to the story in hap¬ 
hazard fashion. The music must moti¬ 
vate the action and play as important 
a role as the plot and the stars.” 

In the more general class, Metro is 
making “Holiday in Mexico” in which 
Jose Iturbi appears as both actor and 
pianist, and Ilona Massey sings. Twen¬ 
tieth Century-Fox is making “Centen¬ 
nial Summer,” for which Jerome Kern 
is composing the music. Paramount is 
making “Blue Skies,” with Bing 
Crosby singing, and Fred Astaire and 
Joan Caulfield dancing to Irving Ber¬ 
lin’s best-loved songs. 

Even such an impressive list as this 
is incomplete, since none of the pro¬ 
ducers are intending to stop making 
musicals. Boris Morros, for instance, 
following “My Immortal Beloved,” 
will make “Carnegie Hall,” which he 
says will go from Toscanini to Elling¬ 
ton, and both Shostakovich and Pro- 
kofieff will come over to appear in it, 
conducting their own compositions. 
After “Carnegie Hall,” Morros will 
make “Babes in Toyland,” using 
George Pal Puppetoons in conjunc- 



Hoagy Carmichael's next picture is 
Technicolor "Canyon Passage" (U). 



SHELF 

Smart, 
Beautiful, 
Useful 

Brighten up your home 
with a new, delightful 
Miracle What-Not Shelf! 
Gracefully designed and 
sturdily constructed of wood, it 
fits into any corner. Comes in 
Ivory, Green, Blue and Peach or natural . . . paint to 
harmonize with your own color scheme. And the cost— 
the ridiculously low price of only $1.98! 

SEND NO MONEY! Tell us what color you want and 
we’ll send it C.O.D. You pay postman only $1.98 plus 
C.O.D. charges (send remittance with order, we’ll pay 
postage). Money back if not completely satisfied. Act nowl 


QUEEN ANNE FURNITURE CO.. Dept. E-1408 
148 Monroe Ave., N. W. Grand Rapids 2. Mich. 


FREE 

ENLARGEMENT 

Just to get acquainted, we will beautifully 
enlarge your favorite snapshot, photo, 
kodak picture, print or negative to 5x7 inches 
absolutely FREE if you enclose this ad. Please 
include color of hair and eyes and get our new 
Bargain Offer, giving you your choice of hand¬ 
some frames with a second enlargement beau¬ 
tifully hand tinted in natural lifelike colors and 
sent on approval. Your original returned with 
your enlargement. Send today. DEAN STUDIOS, 
Dept. 793, 118 N. 15th St., Omaha, Nebraska 



’"Allergic Skin? 


In cosmetics, too, phy¬ 
sicians know best. Ask 
your doctor about AR-EX 
Cosmetics. At leading 
drug stores. Write for' 
FREE BOOKLET: New 
Facts on Skin Care.” 


AR-EX r 

FOR SENSITIVE SKINS 
INC.. lOSt-K W. Van Boren St., Chicago 7, III. 


mOHVf orSpare 

Easy 


GORGEOUS EVERYDAY 

GREETING CARDS 


Extra cash —earn it easily— 
even in spare time— showing 
friends, neighbors thrilling 
new Everyday Greeting Cara 
Assortments. Gorgeous 16-Card All Occasion Assort¬ 
ment only $1.00— big profit for you. Includes Birthday, Get- 
Well. Baby Birth, Friendship, Sympathy and Anniversary Cards. Other 
fast-selling Assortments including Easter, Humorous. Gift-Wrapping. 
Personal Stationery. Samples on approval. Also EXCELLENT FUND¬ 
RAISING OPPORTUNITY FOR ORGANIZATIONS. Write today! 

WALLACE BROWN, INC. 81^' “Sl’wVo^k 



TTkZT, SAMPLi 

IIVEC FABRICS 


II send you this big package of 
Dries and styles ABSOLUTELY 
»’ll see gorgeous, newest 
— lovely lingerie — hosiery — 
men’s shirts and socks— all at LOW 
PRICES. Take orders from friends 
and make money in spare time. 
Get FREE Samples! Send no 
money for this big-profit 
line of sample fabrics aiyl 
styles. It’s yours. ABS0« 
LUTELYFREE. Rush nan* 
.... . _ „ and address now. 

THE MELVILLE CO., Dept. 4087, CINCINNATI 3. OHIO 



MOVIE STAR’S PHOTOS 


from the photo stud 
that makes pictures /< 
the movie stars. 
Exact duplicates of tl 
same highest quali 
photos that we supp 
to movie stars, can no 
be yours. 

LARGE 8" x 
10" size of 
your favorite 
star. State 
second choice. 


VAN JOHNSON 
ED CC —Catalog of miniature photos in- 
■ s K eluded with each order. 

STEWART-CROXTON STUDIOS Dept. ML 
1408 Westwood Blvd., West Los Angeles 24, Calif, 





















































Tftvuicle miniature LAMP 

— glows in the dark! 


SYMBOL OF LOVE FOR YOUR SAILOR, 
SOLDIER OR MARINE 

n the stillness of the night, when 
all is dark, the sails and white- 
caps in this novelty lamp give off 
a gentle glow—in tender thought 
of your loved one overseas . . . 
or in affectionate remembrance 
to welcome him home. Dur¬ 
ing the day the lamp is equal¬ 
ly symbolic, for the shade is 
beautifully decorated with 
signs dear to those who 
have sailed the oceans. 
Lamp 43/ 4 inches high; 
shade 31/* inches in diameter. 
Base made of glass bottle with 
encased ship and ocean diorama. 
Shade of “antiqued” parchment. 
No electricity or other artificial 
lighting required. A wonderful 
gift. Brings cheer and beauty to 
any home. Full price, only $1.49, 
postpaid. SEND NO MONEY. Just 
mail coupon. Satisfaction guar¬ 
anteed. 


Duro Specialty Co., Dept. L-2 
22 West 48th St.. New York 19, N. Y. 

Send me . “Miracle’' Miniature Lamp(s). I will pay 

postman $1.49 each, plus postage, on delivery. (If you 
enclose $1.49 now, we’ll pay postage.) If not satisfied. 
I may return the lamp(s) in 10 days and you will re¬ 
fund my money. 

Name. 

Address. 

City.. 


NEW WRITERS NEEDED 

New writers needed to re-write ideas CDCC 
in newspapers, magazines and boots, ill LU 
Splendid opportunity to "breat into” 
fascinating writing field. May bring DETAILS 
you up to $5.00 per hour spare time. 

Experience unnecessary. Write today for FREE 
details. NO OBLIGATION. Postcard will do. 
COMFORT WRITER'S SERVICE 
200-T42 South Seventh (1) St. Louis, Mo. 


30 Quilt 

YARDS PIECES 


Bargain Sale! Over 3K lbs. 

(30 yards) of beautiful, 
large, fast color, new printa. 

Excellent duality. Bright, 
colorful, gorgeous designs. 

ftlt/FN Big Sewing Outfit 
UIWCR and 20 Quilt Patterns 

with every order. Pay postman only atHIJ 
1.98 plus postage. Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Back. 

Great American Sales Co., 2226 Siberlon Way, Dept. 531 Chicago 16, III. 



SEND NO MONEY! 


For a limited time we will send all women, 

FREE of any cost or obligation, a valu-. 
able booklet together with samples of 
CARBOZINE Tablets. For over 40 years 
women have used these tablets. You can 
now have a trial package of tablets and 
booklet, FREE! Write TODAY! Postcard will do. 

CARBOZINE LABORATORY, Dept. C, ST. LOUIS, MO. 


ASTHMA 


WRITE 


ro. NO-COST TRIAL OFFER! 


IF YOU SUFFER FROM BRONCHIA L ASTHMA PAR¬ 
OXYSMS. from coughs, gasping wheezing—write quick 

for daring NO-RISK, NO-COST TRIAL OFFER. In¬ 
quiries from so-called “hopeless” cases especially invited. 

NACOR, 1092-J State Life Bldg., Indianapolis 4, Ind. 



BUNIONS 


QUICK PAIN RELIEF 

Fairyfoot quickly relieves terrible 
stinging itching bunion pains . . . 
Swelling goes down. — No special 
shoes. Apply soothing Fairyfoot 
and get blessed relief quickly. 
FREE SAMPLE.— Write Today I 
I t’s Free. No cost to you. 


FAIRYFOOT, 1223 So. Wabash, Dent. 6742. CHICAGO 5. ILLINOIS 




LEARN 

"QUICKLY, EASILY 
AT HOME 

Splendid income, new social contacts, and the 
satisfaction of serving humanity can be yours 
as a TRAINED PRACTICAL NURSE. Ages 18 
to 60. High School not necessary. Training plan welcomed 
by physicians. Prepare in spare time. Many earn while 
learning. NURSE'S OUTFIT and Placement Guidance in¬ 
cluded. EASY PAYMENT PLAN. Write now for facts and 
fascinating FREE sample lesson page*. 

WAYNE SCHOOL OF PRACTICAL NURSING, INC. 

2301 N. Wayne Ave., Dept. A B-9, Chicago 14, Illinois 


tion with live, real-actor characters. 

As Walter Scharf says, “The Amer¬ 
ican public is getting warmth and 
understanding for better music. The 
musical productions which are now 
being planned are only a small be¬ 
ginning of what will eventually be 
done with music in motion pictures.” 

It all adds up to happy days ahead 
for moviegoers. But the people who 
are happiest of all over the prospects 
are the musicians who have worked so 
faithfully and quietly in Hollywood 
studios for lo these many years. You 
probably haven’t noticed their names, 
as the credits unrolled on the screen, 
but you ought to, and as time goes on, 
you will. They’re gifted and intelli¬ 
gent men, highly educated and skilled 
in their profession, and have con¬ 
tributed greatly to your enjoyment 
of films with their composition and 
arrangement of background music 
which has often been so skillfully 
woven into the theme of a picture that 
you were scarcely aware of it. 

Speaking of this, Boris Morros said, 
“Background music has played an im¬ 
portant part in making audiences more 
music-conscious. It used to be just 
what the name says—background 
music. But today background music 
steps often into the foreground. In 
the old days we used to cue music to 
motions—like accenting a man’s foot¬ 
steps as he walked. Today we cue the 
music not to his motions, but to his 
emotions. The music tells why he is 
walking—not how. It fulfills what is 
not photographed. 

“We are reaching the age of ideal¬ 
ism. The world is becoming smaller 
as a result of great advances in com¬ 
munications and airplane travel, and 
our horizons are growing wider. 
Twenty years ago, the people who 
went to opera and concerts would not 
go to see pictures. And the people 
who liked pictures considered opera 
and symphony highbrow, stuffy. To¬ 
day we have only one audience. 

“If I had suggested to Metro pro¬ 
ducers, even two years ago, making 
a picture with Lauritz Melchior, the 
great Wagnerian tenor, I would have 
been laughed off the lot. Today he is 
making pictures and he is a box office 
hit.” 

Mr. Morros, who was formerly di¬ 
rector of music at Paramount Studios, 



Judy Garland, Rob’t Walker star in 
"Till The Clouds Roll By," based on 
the life story of late Jerome Kern. 



Let this 

REVEALING BOOK 


Help You... 

about women, for women, by a woman 

For complete happiness, you must maintain your 
charm, daintiness and allure all over. How to do 
this is explained clearly, simply and in detail in 
this priceless book, "Woman s Personal Hygiene.” 
Here, in one wonderful volume, you will find au¬ 
thoritative information on this delicate subject . . . 
including an expose on harmful equipment and 
practices. Endorsed by prominent Medical Journals. 
Contains frank advice to women who wish to pre¬ 
serve ... or regain . . . their feminine charm. 
"Woman’s Personal Hygiene" was written by 
Leona W. Chalmers, doctor's wife, who devoted a 
lifetime to the study of this all-important subject. 
In the foreword of the book, 

DR. WINFIELD SCOTT PUGH SAYS: 

"In the chapters of "Woman’s Personal Hygiene” 
a woman talks to women in a way readily grasped 
by her own sex ... This book can be recommended 
without hesitation to those desirous of understand¬ 
ing the intimate side of a woman's life, and that 
should include every member of the sex.” 

ORDER BY MAIL 


"Woman’s Personal Hygiene” contains 192 enlighten¬ 
ing pages and over 40 interesting illustrations. Its 14 
chapters give you all the vital information about 
female organs, social diseases, proper personal hygiene, 
normal female functions and many other importanc 
facts. After reading this book, your life will seem to 
begin anew 1 Mail the coupon and the book will be 
sent by return mail in unmarked wrapper. If you’re 
not delighted with it, return it within 10 days for a 
refund of your purchase price. 



MAIL 


Intimate Side 
of a Woman’s 
Life 


COUPON NOW 


The 




PIONEER PUBLICATIONS, INC., DEPT. 172 
1790 Broadway, New York 19, N. Y. 

Please send “Woman’s Personal Hygiene” In unmarked 
wrapper. I get my purchase price refunded in 10 days if 
I’m not satisfied. 

□ I enclose $1.98. Send postpaid. 

□ Send C.O.D. I'll pay postman $1.98 plus postage. 


Name.Age. 

Address... 


City. 


Zone.State. 


105 








































FEBRUARY PAGEANT'S terrify¬ 
ing tale of how a detective appre¬ 
hended the quiet, soft-spoken, 
money-mad killer who murdered 
22 of his wives is a spine chiller with 
tremendous impact. Read "Cali¬ 
fornia Bluebeard" in February 
PAGEANT—today! 

THERE'S MONEY IN ACCI¬ 
DENTS . . . freak misfortunes that 
mean headaches to the insurance 
companies and dollars to policy 
holders. Read all about it in 
February PAGEANT. 

ARTIST VS. PHOTOGRAPHER 

. . . pin-up artist George Petty in 
competition with one of Holly¬ 
wood's ace cameramen—with out¬ 
standing samples of their master¬ 
pieces. See this feature in Feb¬ 
ruary PAGEANT. 

JOE LOUIS, AMERICAN . . . 

a digest of Margery Miller's vigor¬ 
ous biography of "The Champ". 
A book destined for wide reader- 
ship. 

Read February 

PAGEANT 

America's most exciting magazine 
At your newsstand.25c 


and since 1939 has been Professor of 
Music at the University of Southern 
California, is well qualified to com¬ 
ment on the development in musical 
taste of audiences, and he makes some 
interesting observations on the stu¬ 
dents under his supervision. 

“It used to be,” he says, “that some 
students would go around the campus 
with jazz recordings under their arms, 
and others would carry albums of 
Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky. And 
the two groups would snub each other. 

“Now that’s all changed. There are 
no separate groups. All of them recog¬ 
nize the value of various kinds of 
music, as different parts of the great 
field of entertainment, and you will 
see students carrying recordings of 
Stravinsky, Beethoven, and Art Tatum 
all in one collection. 

“Today the only thing that matters 
is good performance. There is no one 
type of music that you can call popu¬ 
lar music. There are only popular 
performers. It is the performer who 
determines the style of a song. Today 
you have Bing Crosby singing Ave 
Maria, Frank Sinatra singing ‘None 
But the Lonely Heart,’ and Lauritz 
Melchoir singing ‘Please Don’t Say 
No—Say Maybe.’ 

“And another thing, there is no more 
Tin Pan Alley today. The modern 
songwriter is not just a songwriter, he 
is a composer. Young men who want 
to compose music today prepare them¬ 
selves with thorough musical study 
and training. Students used to come 
to me and say, ‘I’m just like Irving 
Berlin—I don’t know anything about 
music—I just play by ear.’ They don’t 
say that any more. Now they realize 
that only one in a million has the 
great talent of Irving Berlin, and that 
without it, one must have training to 
succeed. Today they come to me and 
say, ‘I studied so many years in my 
home town, I graduated from Curtis 
Institute, now I want to take up com¬ 
position.’ ” 

Mr. Morros believes that it is now 
possible for the movies to develop 
just as great voices as opera or con¬ 
cert stage. A new art is being born, 
he says, and the cinema will create 
new singers and a new form of ex¬ 
pression for which a new word will 
have to be created. It will be a new 
synthetic form of musical entertain¬ 
ment possible only to the screen, and 
the new form will fall somewhere be¬ 
tween “Song to Remember” and 
“Anchors Aweigh.” 

One of the most energetic and en¬ 
thusiastic young composers in the 
business today is David Raksin, at 
Twentieth Century-Fox, who com¬ 
posed the score for “Laura,” and also 
“Fallen Angel” with Alice Faye, Dana 
Andrews, and Linda Darnell. (Inci¬ 
dentally, he wrote that beautiful 
melody “Laura” one night in his small 
studio at home “in a ghastly state of 
loneliness, surrounded by pictures of 
my beautiful wife, who was 3,000 
miles away” and hasn’t met Gene 
Tierney yet!)' 

Besides composing music, Mr. Rak¬ 
sin has haunted the sound engineering 
and recording departments to learn 
the intricacies of that highly technical 
phase of the industry, and now works 
closely with the sound technicians all 
through the dubbing process. Obvi¬ 
ously he loves his work and every¬ 
thing connected with it. 

Asked if he felt restricted at times 
by the necessity to subordinate music 
to dramatic requirements, he replied, 
“Definitely not! I think that kind of 
attitude is a lot of baloney. Naturally 



Spike Jones and His City Slickers click in 
Eddie Bracken pic, “Ladies Man" (Para.). 


there are many things to be desired, 
many difficulties to be overcome in 
our work. And of course, there are 
times when we all wish we were in 
the trucking business instead. 

“But the making of a picture is a 
co-operative business, and it’s silly to 
want any one element to overshadow 
the others. There are many fine things 
being done in the musical end of film 
making today, and improvements in 
metnod and technique are being made 
all the time. Producers and directors 
are becoming more and more con¬ 
scious of the problems of musicians. 
Also many of the executives today are 
musically educated men. 

“There is a saying that sums up 
musicians’ hopes—‘Music is now the 
frosting on the cake. It should be one 
of the ingredients.’ We look forward, 
too, to the time when producers will 
realize that films tend to be too gabby. 
People don’t talk all the time, and 
there should be more passages in pic¬ 
tures where there is no dialogue, the 
musical background covering the ac¬ 
tion. They had a scene like that in 
‘Laura,’ where the detective was walk¬ 
ing around her apartment, looking at 
her things, and there was no sound 
except the music. That sort of thing 
is being done more all the time.” 

Musicians at the Walt Disney Studio 
feel that their position is particularly 
fortunate, in that music has always 
been an integral part of Disney pic¬ 
tures, and very often the story idea 
grows out of the music, instead of 
vice versa. But in any case, there is 
close co-operation from start to finish 
between musicians, writers, and tech¬ 
nicians. 

What all musicians hope for is the 
day when they can work on each pic¬ 
ture from the inception of the idea 
clear through to the finish, in close 
collaboration with the writers, direc¬ 
tor, film editor, etc. That day seems 
to be arriving, so it’s no wonder you 
find musicians at every studio purring 
with pleasure. 

On many questions, the musicians 
in Hollywood have their differences of 
opinion, but there’s one thing they 
all agree on: that is, this present trend 
toward musicals is definitely not just 
another “cycle” such as we’ve had 
several times before. Music is here to 
stay—all kinds of music. 

The End 













WOMEN 


and get your own dresserwithout a pinny o^ost 


P icturc-boo k 
pretty in soft 
rayon print. 


Butcher linen 
suit with polka- 
dotted blouse. 


Send for 

FREE 

Portfolio of 

ADVANCED 


THE FAMOUS, v 
NATIONALLY ADVERTISED 


Ishion Frocks, Inc. 

,esk 22C97, Cincinnati 25, on. 

fES _l am interested in your op, 
,me and get my own dresses wit 
..formation, without obligation 


Address. 


Color chevrons 
highlight a ray¬ 
on-linen casual. 


OUR 38th YEAR IN BUSINESS 



' . w s 




r 


• • • 














No Extra Color Rinse Needed . . . No soap film 


stmf 





Xk, 






NEW 7^ CREME SHAMPOO HAIR COLORING 

Instantly Makes Old Hair Look Young Again 




Why put up with old looking, 
gray, drab or faded hair. Just 
brush on Tintz Creme Sham¬ 
poo 1 lair Coloring then sham¬ 
poo. One application cleanses, 
reconditions and recolors to 
any of 8 beautiful natural ap¬ 
pearing youthful shades. Get 
glorious new color now. Only 
$1.00 plus tax at d rug and 
dept, stores or use convenient 
coupon. Caution: Use only as 
directed on label and perfect 
results are guaranteed. 


nccUedSend 


Color Lasts ... 

On I y occasional retouch- 
grown hair 
Coupon Now. 


NTZ Company, Dopf. 74-C, 205 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, III. 
or Canada, Dept. 74-C, 22 College St., Toronto, Ont.) 

| Send TINTZ Color Shampoo Cake in shade checked at right. ( ) cake 60c 
(including tax). ( ) 2 cakes $1.20 (including tax). 

Send TINTZ Creme Shampoo Hair Coloring in shade checked at right. 
$1.20 (including tax). 

i arrival I will deposit amount of order, plus postage, with postman on 
nitive guarantee if I'm not entirely satisfied I may return empty carton in 
days for a refund, (if money with order all postage prepaid.) 
kME. 

(Print Plainly). 

■DRESS . 

ry. 


I bis remarkable discovery, T. intz Color Shampoo, washes 
out dirt, loose dandruff, grease, .as it safely gives hair a 
real smooth, colorful tint that fairly glows with life and 
lustre. Don t put up with faded, dull, off-color hair a 
minute longer. Each shampoo leaves your hair more 
colorful, lovelier, softer, and easier to manage. No dyed 
look. \\ on t hurt permanents. Leaves lovely sheen. 

t co&i rf&rza&ip 


That’s why your hair looks so natural, 
glamorous. Can’t be detected—doesn’t 
shout “dyed”. Try Tintz today. 


/&zc£ xA&p'idqft 









THE NEW 




For new exciting glamorous color 
miike-up select the Tintz shade most 
suitable for you. Instant lather, no 
after rinse needed, no soap film 
try 1 intz now—for more sparkle, lustre 
and colorlul sheen. Seven shades— 
Blonde, Auburn, Henna, Light, Medium, 
Dark Brown and Black. Only 50c plus 
tax. Enough for 15 shampoos. 




' r y Jjr 



7-DAY 


COUPON 


Xo\v get Tintz at most 
Drug and Cosmetic Coun¬ 
ters or mail convenient 
coupon today. 


ZONE_STATE 















©Cl8 732 5 Lj 


No other shampoo leaves 
your hair so lustrous, 
yet so easy to manage 


Romance in the air! Dates in the making! 

And you ... looking irresistible with shining-smooth 
hair. There’s something about Drene-lovely hair 
that goes straight to a man's heart. 

“Change your hair-do to match the moods of many 
wonderful evenings,” says famous Cover Girl Madelon Mason. 
She shows you these alluring hair-dos you can try at home 
or ask your beauty shop to duplicate. 

Your hair is so easy to fix, so smooth and manageable when you 
use Drene with Hair Conditioning Action. No other shampoo 
leaves your hair so lustrous, yet so easy to manage! 


IF he’s A SOPHISTICATE and loves you to look glamorous, try this brilliant 
upsweep. “I use Drene,” says Madelon, “because it leaves my hair far more 
lustrous than any soap.” Actually as much as 33 percent more lustre! Since 
Drene is not a soap shampoo, it never leaves any dulling film on hair as all 
soaps do. And Drene completely removes unsightly dandruff the very first 
time you use it. The dramatic neckline of this Ceil Chapman gown 
sets off this striking hair-do, that you can arrange by gathering 
all hair to side-ton, tie and divide into twin swirls. 


Hair Conditioning Action 


IF HE PREFERS SPORTS like bowling, he’ll 
admire a tailored hair-do like this sleek 
shining braid. “I like to wear.a scarf for 
active games,” says Madelon, “but still show 
plenty of hair.” Of course you’ll want to 
show your hair too, when it’s so lovely. All 
the natural brilliance is revealed by Drene! 


•m 








a Salon-Type COLD WAVE 



PRICED WITHIN REACH OF ALL 






ERMANENT 

Home 


Now, give yourself the sensational guaranteed, easy- 
to-eare-for COLD WAVE PERMANENT in the con- 
venience of your own home ... do it at a cost so low, 
it’s amazing! Thanks to the wonderful discovery 
that’s yours in the NEW CHARM-KURL SUPREME 
COLD Wave Kit, you can easily COLD WAVE your 
hair in 2 to 3 hours. Gel the NEW Charm-Kurl Cold 
Wave and know the joy of soft, glamorous, natural 
looking long-lasting curls and waves . . . by tonight! 


Simple, Easy / Convenient... Perfect Results or Money Back 


Women everywhere demand permanents the new 
Cold Wave way and, no wonder. . . . An entirely 
new, gentle process, you just put your hair up in 
the curlers provided and let the CHARM-KURL 
Supreme Cold Waving solution, containing 
“KURLIUM,” do all the work. Perfect com¬ 
fort, no heat, no heavy clamps, no machinery, no 
ammonia. Yet, given closer to the scalp, your 
Charm-Kurl Cold Wave permanent results in 


longer lasting, safer, lustrous curls and waves 
that appear natural, glamorous, ravishing. 
Why put up with straight hair that is hard to 
dress in the latest fashion when you can know 
the joy of a real, honest-to-goodness genuine 
Cold Wave Permanent, by tonight! Ask for the 
NEW Charm-Kurl Supreme Cold Wave Perma¬ 
nent, the new, easy-to-use home permanent kit 
today. Test, compare, you must be pleased be¬ 
yond words or your money hack. 


Consider this 
Important Fact 


—works "Like a mill ion” on children’s soft, fine hair. 


Only Charm-Kurl contains 
“ Kurlium ”* the quick work¬ 
ing hair beautifier—that’s why 
only Charm-Kurl gives such 
wonderful results for so much 
less. No wonder women every¬ 
where say Charm-Kurl SU¬ 
PREME is the nation’s biggest 
Home COLD WAVE value! In¬ 
sist always on Charm-Kurl SU¬ 
PREME with “Kurlium.”* 

mi *Kurliuni 99 is U. S. Registered. No 
one else can make this statement. 






rhe new Charm-Kurl SUPREME COLD WAVE Kit is for sale 
it Drug Stores, Cosmetic Counters and 5c and 10c Stores. Get one 
oday—thrill to new-found glamorous hair beauty by tonight. 
*rice in Canada $1.35 Tax Included—at Drug, Cosmetic and Va- 
iety Counters. Canadian Address: FRASER HAIR FASHIONS, 
!2 College St., Toronto, Ont. 



SUPREME 


COLD WAVE 



Each kit contains 
a 3-ounce bottle of 
salon-type COLD 
WAVE solution, 
60 curlers, 60 end 
tissues, cotton ap¬ 
plicator, neutral¬ 
izer and easy-to- 
follow instructions. 










★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

★ 

★ 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 

A 


.CrOt 





Published in 
this space 
every month 


j The greatest 

V star of the 

screen! 


Guess who’s back? 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

And guess who’s got him? 

★ ★ ★ ★ 


GABLE’S 
BACK ! 




and 

G ARSON’S 
_ _ __ GOT HIM! 

★ ★ 

in M-G-M’s exciting love story... 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

ADVENTURE. 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

Yes, Adventure adds up to being the 

most exciting and thoroughly enjoyable 
screen Adventure we’ve been on, in 
many a season of movie-going. 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

Gable is a tough, swaggering, romantic 
bos’n who has made love and trouble 
in every port on the seven seas. 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

Garson’s a girl whose greatest Adventure 
is a picnic on Sunday. 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

Then—WHAM! They meet! 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

It’s lightning and thunder...it’s sound 
and fury...it’s wind and flame...it’s 
heaven and some of the other! 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

It’s love on every note of the keyboard 
—laughing, lilting love; roaring, raging 
love. It’s Gable and Garson in the 
screen’s most exciting Adventure! 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

Pardon us, while we doff our cap to 
Joan Blondell and Thomas Mitchell, 
who turn in such stand-out performances. ■ 

.★ ★ ★ ★ 

And a low bow to the excellent support¬ 
ing cast—to Victor Fleming for his fine 
direction—to Sam Zimbalist for his 
super production—to Frederick Hazlitt 
Brennan and Vincent Lawrence for their 
screen play with a punch! 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

They’ve given us a great entertain¬ 
ment Adventure that marks the return 
of our favorite swell guy, Clark Gable 
—and the advent of Greer Garson in 
a zestfully different role! 

—Jleo 



“The Beginning 
Or The End” 
will be the most im¬ 
portant picture of 1946. 
It is the story of the 
atomic bomb! 




§§§£ 


j 

/ 



VOL. 4 


0 ® II 


/ 

MARCH, 1916 


NO. 2 


Stfnced 

27. Oh You Nasty Dan! 

(Duryea) 

By Kay Proctor 

29. Relatively Speaking 

By Leslie Traine 

31 Handy Man (Dana Andrews) 
By Avery Carroll 

33.. Lucky Lady 

(Barbara Hale) 

By Helen Louise Walker 

36.Change of Face 

(Hurd Hatfield) 

By Gertrude Shanklin 

39.Great Scott! (Lizabeth) 

By Mickell Novak 

43.Hail, Cesar! (Romero) 

By Dorothy B. Haas 

45 The Lass With the Delicate 
Air (Dorothy McGuire) 

By Fredda Dudley 

48 Dream Boy (Guy Madison) 
By Dorothy Deere 

53. Swoon Man of Seventy 

Millions (Dick Tracy) 

By Katherine Lake 

54. Who’s New 

By Alice L. Tildesley 


'P&rt'uzitd- 

28. Ida Lupino 

30.Dana Andrews 

32. Barbara Hale 

35. Patricia Roc 

37 Hurd Hatfield 

39. Lizabeth Scott 

41. Anne Baxter 

'peatccie* 

14. So Proudly We Hail 

16. This Was Hollywood 

24. Reading From Writing 

(Jean Pierre Aumont) 

By Helen King 

46. Youth in the Headlines 

By Shirley Cook 

6. Inside Hollywood 

By Fredda Dudley 

12. Letters to the Editor 

18... . Movieland’s Crossword 

Puzzle 

20 Movieland’s New Picture 

Guide 

22 Those Glamorous Newcomers 
By Shirley Cook 

34 .Pictures in Production 

By Fredda Dudley 

51. Words of Music 

By Jill Warren 
102 Your Problem and Mine 
. By Jane Wyman 


DORIS CLINE, Editor 

PEG NICHOLS, Assistant Editor 

BOB BECKER, Art Editor 


HELEN LIMKE, Hollj'wood Editor 
BILL DUDAS, Staff Photographer 
ROBERT CROSSETT, Ass’t Art Ed. 


MOVIELAND. published monthly by JMovieland, inc., at Dunellen N I Advertising 
editorial offices, 535i Fifth Avenue, New York 17 N. Y. Hollywood editorial office: 9126 
Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles 46, California. Chicago advertising office: 333 No Michr 

J n Avenue, Chicago, Ill. Vol. 4, No/2, March, 1946. Entered as second class matter 
ecember IS, 1942, at the post office at Dunellen, N. J., under the Act of March 3 1879 
1Ce - 1 ?, C . a ,o C i ) i >y K Subscription pnc^ $180 in the United States and $1.80 in Canada' 
ipyright 1946 by Movieland Inc.,/ The publishers accept no responsibility for uni 
licited manuscripts, and all manuscripts should be accompanied by a stamned self 
addressed envelope. Printed in the United States of America. Price 15c a copy in Canada 
MEMBER AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS 














































in M-G-M s exciting screen 

Aeh/enfiire 

CLARK GABLE • GREER GARSON in Victor Fleming s production of ' ADVENTURE" with Joon Blondell • Thomas Mitchell 

TOM TULLY • JOHN QUALEN • RICHARD HAYDN • LINA ROMAY • HARRY DAVENPORT • Screen Ploy by FREDERICK HAZUTT BRENNAN pnd VINCENT LAWRENCE • Adaptation by 
Anthony Veiller and William H. Wright • Based on b Novel by Clyde Boon Davis * DIRECTED BY VICTOR FLEMING * PRODUCED BY SAM ZI MB ALI ST •* A MET RO‘OOLDWYN m M AYER PICTURE 



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































Esther Williams got in the matrimonial sv/im 
with her marriage to announcer Ben Gage. 


VITAL STATISTICS: 

In one week, Hollywood was recently 
stood on end like a Chinese egg at Easter by 
the swiit changes in domestic arrangements, 
to wit: 

Orson Welles and Rita Hayworth split (the 
betting as this is written stands two to one 
that the riit will not be permanent). 

Marie McDonald and Vic Orsatti an¬ 
nounced their friendly separation. 

Frances Rafferty and Major ,Don Horton 
parted. 

Carole Landis married theatrical producer 
Horace Schmidlapp. (Her friends feel certain 
that this is the marriage for Carole and that 
she has found happiness at last—and it 
couldn't happen to a nicer girl.) 

As predicted here some months ago. Margo 
married Eddie Albert. 

MISSING GUEST: 

When Esther Williams, wearing pale pink 
crepe, a pink lace halo hat with a shoulder- 
length veil, and carrying a white prayer 
book from which hung white orchids and 
bovardia, married Ben Gage, the only in¬ 
vited guest who failed to appear was Van 
Johnson. 

As soon as Esther returned from her 
honeymoon, she telephoned Van to find out 
why the omission. Said a hurt Van, "But, 


Esther, I didn't get an invitation." 

"You were so," she countered. . "I ad¬ 
dressed the invitation myself and sent it 
to the studio because I didn’t know where 
you were hiding out at the moment." 

In order for Van to get his rest and preserve 
a modicum of privacy, he finds it necessary 
to move rather often; for that reason some 
of his personal mail gets mixed up with the 
tons of fan mail that come in every day. 
One of the harassed secretaries will un¬ 
doubtedly faint, some day soon, when she 

opens the wedding invitation. 

* * * 

GOLDEN APPLING: 

Each year the Hollywood Women's Press 
Club selects, by secret ballot, the actor and 
the actress who have been most cooperative 
during the past twelve months. This year 
Gregory Peck won by two votes over Dana 
Andrews. Joan Crawford snagged feminine 
honors over June Allyson. 

For the first time, a special award was given 
Frank Sinatra in recognition of his magnifi¬ 
cent and constructive work in the fields of 
juvenile delinquency and racial tolerance. 
Nancy Sinatra accepted the framed award 
because Frank was on the train en route home 
after a hospital tour. She quite captivated 
the club members by saying, "I am grateful 
to you in Frank's behalf, in my own behalf, 
and on behalf of the two little Sinatras, be- 
cquse I think that if they were old enough to 
read this tangible acknowledgement of what 
he has been trying to do. they would be very 
proud of their dad." 

Gregory's speech was brief and very much 


to the point. He said that he was sorry Dana 
couldn't have joined us (Dana was working 
on "Canyon Passage" and Walter Wanget 
wouldn't allow him the necessary two hours 
for luncheon as the Press Club guest, so 
maybe Mr. Wanger will get some sort of 
reverse award next year), and Gregory added 
that he was doubly elated over the award 
because he has been a part of the Hollywood 
scene for only two and one-half years. How¬ 
ever. when one realizes that during those 
thirty months he has never been between 
pictures, yet has given all the stories re¬ 
quested, posed for all the desired pictures, 
and made fast personal friends of many of 
the local writers it is easy to understand his 
winning the kudos. 

Joan Crawford, governing herself with the 
utmost poise and charm, despite great emo¬ 
tional strain (she and Phil Terry had an¬ 
nounced their separation only a day before 
the Press Club party), said simply that she 
wished she were a man. because—being a 
girl—she was unable to control just a few 
grateful tears. 

The award given the man is always a gold 
script holder on which is embossed the golden 
apple; for the girl, the golden apple takes the 
form of a lapel clip. 

The Press Club also selects the male and 
female Thespian deemed to have behaved 
in the most uncooperative manner during the 
year. Miss Greer Garson came in for the 
literary frown this year, and right beside her 
was Mr. Fred McMurray. 

Runner-up in the uncooperative department 
was Lauren Bacall, but she was beaten by 


f 


6 



David Niven returns after six years in the Brit¬ 
ish Army. A scheduled pic, "The Bishop's Wife." 



surprise weaa.ng or oette Uav.s to artist Grant Sherry took place in chapel of famo 
Rivers.de Mission Inn.. Bettes mother married Woodbury Palmer (above) a week befo, 





















A Million Dollars Worth of Fun 
in the New Billion-Dollar 
Smart Set Playground! 

Paramount sets a new style in romancing, 
dancing, singing and laughing ... in the 
lavish .. . lovely show that only Mitchell 
Leisen of "Lady In The Dark" and 
"Frenchman's Creek" fame could give you! 








DOROTHY LAMOUR 

Ofld 

ARTURO de CORDOVA 


Hear Dottie’s South-of-the- 
Border songs and see the most 
gorgeous gowns you’ve ever 
^ "Ooohed" and "Aaahed" at. 


X* '• 


wim 

PATRIC KNOWLES • ANN DVORAK • GEORGE RIGAUO 

Natalie Schafer • Mikhail Rasumny • Billy Daniel 
and The Guadalojara Trio 

a MITCHELL LEISEN PRODUCTION 

Produced by KARL TUNBERG • Directed by MITCHELL LEISEN 

Ha, i, KA»l tVMMtG ■ tmTai, S»«rr b, IDWIN JUSTUS MATH WSMCBt 

A PARAMOUNT PICTURE 




7 






















a huge majority. When Bogie learned that 
his wife had won even so negative a notice 
as nomination in the uncooperative class, but 
that early tabulations indicated Miss Garson 
would win in a walk, he said facetiously, 
"How about that! Here a new kid comes to 
Hollywood and gets a break. Then she is 
nominated for a press award. What happens! 
Here's what happens, a girl who has had 
everything—a girl who has won the Acad¬ 
emy Award, the Zip. Zop, Trip, and Photo¬ 
play Gold Medal Award, in short, a girl who 
has had every possible honor—comes along 
and noses out this hard-working newcomer. 
Pressure from the big boys—that's what it is!" 

This delicious interpretation was repeated 
the length and breadth of Hollywood for days 
after its enunciation. 

At the party at which the awards were 
given, Cary Grant, a fugitive in makeup from 
the RKO set for "Notorious," served as Santa 
Claus, and Jimmy Durante entertained with 
such delectable musical tidbits as "Umbri- 
ago," "Bill Bailey," and something about 
having found the lost chord. 

Quite a party: quite a party. 


Stops . 

Perspiration 

Troubles 

JFaster 

THAN YOU SLIP ON YOUR SLIP 


fcxpect postwar miracles. Look for 
this new, excitingly different idea 
in deodorants. Ask for new super-fast 
ODORONO Cream Deodorant... 
stops perspiration troubles faster 
than you can slip on your slip. 
Because it contains science’s most 
effective perspiration stopper. 

Affords other greatly needed blessings 

too: Will not irritate your skin_ 

or harm fine fabrics... or turn gritty 
in the jar. And really protects 
up to 3 days. 


Change to ODORONO Cream 
Deodorant—super-fast... 
super-modern... excitingly different. 


LATTER DAY DELILAH: 

On the set of "The Dark Corner" Lucille 
Ball studied her wardrobe girl critically, said, 
"I wish you'd let me cut your hair; I know of 
a way that would be very becoming to you." 

"You're kidding, of course," said the ward¬ 
robe girl. 

"I certainly am not," insisted Lucille. "When 
I was a model, I had to learn to do all sorts 
of things, and one of my knacks is cutting 
hair." With a certain amount of trepidation, 
the wardrobe girl submitted herself to the 
scissors, with the result that four or five 
additional victims promptly offered them¬ 
selves to Miss Ball as clients. First thing you 
know, Lucille will be picketed by the West- 
mores. 

CRACK IN THE RECORD: 

Local rumor has it that Bud Abbott and 
Lou Costello are writing a book about their 
show business experiences tentatively titled 
"The Corn Is Groan." . 

MISSTEPS: 

Both Ann Miller and Eleanor Powell were 
astounded one morning recently to read a 
newspaper gossip item to the effect that "Ann 
and Eleanor have gone to Harry Cohn, head 
of Columbia Studios, asking that he locate a 



39 * 

Also 59f and 10^ 
Plus Federal Tax 


CREAM 

DEODORANT 


NEW, Superfast 

0D0R0-D0 


ODORONO ICE is back from the wars ... 39? 



A Press Club fa'/orite! Joan Crawford, 
the "most cooperative actress" for '45. 


story to co-star the girls who are now best- 
friends and are eager to make a dancing 
picture together." Truth of the matter was 
that the girls had met just once before this 
item appeared. Furthermore, Eleanor has had 
dozens of offers to return to the screen, and 
a score more begging her to make New York 
personal appearances “to the extent of six 
figures weekly, but has rejected all in favoi 
of being wife to Glenn Ford and mother to 
Master Peter Newton. 

SO SLEEP THE VIGILANT: 

Danny Milland, tricycle-aged son of the 
Ray Millands, recently became the owner of 
a complete frontier outfit, including chaps, 
shirt, sombrero, holster, cap pistol, and a 
neckerchief. To say that he admired this out 
fit is as cautious a statement as to say that, 
on occasion. Tommy Manville has conlem 
plated marriage. 

A dinner guest at the Millands was invited 
upstairs after Danny had been put to bed, to 
view the state considered by the young war 
rior to be satisfactory for slumber. He was 
clad in pajamas over which was buckled his 
gunbelt and holster, and the trusty six-shootec 
lay heavy on the recumbent hip. Tied around 
his lower face, so that only a pair of closed 
eyelids fringed by long lashes were visible, 
was his cowpoke bandana. All set to hold up 
the sandman! 

BY JUDGE—NOT BY STORK: 

And Hollywood has three distinguished 
new citizens via the Naturalization route 
pianist Vladimir Horowitz, actor Paul Hen 
reid, and director Andre de Toth. 

MOMENT SUPREME: 

For the most part, the men aboard the trans 
port were fairly glum. They had written 
home that they would dock in San Francisco; 
instead, their boat was being warped into a 
berth in Portland, Oregon. Standing at the 
rail, they stared disconsolately at the clumps 
of welcoming civilians on the wharf, think¬ 
ing that no relative could have traced them to 
this port. Particularly disheartened was o 
Marine Lieutenant who knew that his wife 
was probably sitting in a hotel room or on 
a park bench in San Francisco, head deep 
in gloom over having missed him. Abruptly 
the gleam of a blonde head on the dock be 
low stunned the lieutenant into action. He 
hurdled the rail and leaped to the dock to 



Gregory Peclc won the Golden Apple prize 
for being the most cooperative actor." 









, /A' £at, ■ cxjruL a 'nfM foiuwpA fa, WARNERS! 


w f | vk* ^ she sold.. 

I II* “A woman isn’t meant to be lonely, 
she’s meant to be loved. 


Screen ploy by CATHERINE TURNEY from the novel "Instruct My Sorrows" by Clare Jaynes • Music by MAX STEINER 






Y»*-there‘s nothing like bright, sparkling 
hair to make a girl more attractive AND— 
to bring a flood of Valentines to her door, 




What'. the secret 
of such glamor¬ 
ous hair? It’s sim¬ 
ple—when you use 
Nestle Colorinse. 
For Colorinse fills 
your hair-with 
glow'ing high¬ 
lights—adds radi¬ 
ant color and 
gives your hair a softer, silkier sheen. 

See how gleaming 
hair makes your 
eyes and your 
whole face 
brighter! Start to¬ 
day to use Nestle 
Colorinse and dis¬ 
cover for yourself 
that glamorous 
hair is one sure way to 

ksk yeer becutlcian for on Opolest.nl Creme Wave 
Ha.tla—originators of permanent wavlof. 


0 A 


a. man’s heart. 



Delicately perfumed Nestle 
Hairlac keeps all styles of 
hairdos looking well-groomed 
throughout the day. Also adds 
sheen and lustre to your hair. 

2 Va oz. bottle 25t. \ 

\7teotCe. HAIRIAC 



take the weeping girl into his arms. The lieu¬ 
tenant's shipmates screamed encouragement: 
"Take it easy, Jesse James!" Meanwhile, 
Tyrone Power was saying to Annabella, 
"How'd you get so smart, Blondie?" Anna¬ 
bella was too happy to answer. 

CAUGHT SHORT: 

Dick and Kay Crane are living, as you 
prpbably know, in the guest house belonging 
to a quondam-ambitious estate in the Holly¬ 
wood hills. It is compact and- comfortable, 
but still commodious enough for the presence 
of gremlins. In the bedroom there is only 
one closet, the area of which could be 
covered by a gentleman's handkerchief. Dick 
volunteered to squeeze his clothing into this 
space, leaving the closet across the hall tor 
Kay. 

Unfortunately, the front door is equipped 
with a generous square of clear glpss, and 
passage to the closet and back to the bed¬ 
room is in full view of this doer. Not long 
ago, Kay had just stepped into the .closet, 
clad in scanties, when the doorbell rang. 
Quickly, she stepped into the closet and 
closed the door while Dick answered the bell. 

He ushered the unexpected callers into the 
living room, which is also in full view of the 
closet door and entertained them as best he 
could until someone said, "Where's Kay?” 

"One moment," said Dick and stepped to 
the closet door to inquire, "And now are you 
ready to come out like a good girl?" From 
the interior came a muffled affirmative, so 
Dick opened the door. 

The expression on the faces of their friends 
was something that Dick and Kay will 
cherish always; it was too good to spoil by 
explanation. 

RIOTOUS LIVIN': 

This may be somewhat late tor a Christmas 
story, but it bears such delightful connota¬ 
tions that it is worth recording. John Payne 
took his daughter, Julie, down to see Santa 
Claus who made the usual inquiry of the 
young lady. Responded Julie, "For Christ¬ 
mas I want a^set of drums, a tambourine, and 
a pink elephant." 

John and Santa Claus exchanged glances; 
Santa grinned and John swallowed hard. 
Howeverj he set out in search of a pink ele¬ 
phant. found only blue. So Julie received a 
note from Santa Claus on Christmas morning 
reading. "All the pink elephants had been 


reserved by the older generation, Julie, but I 
brought you this lovely blue one instead." 

BIOG BRIEFS: 

Deanna Durbin's name troubles are now 
over. If her infant is a boy, he will be 
named Jeffrey Allen, if a girl, she will be 
called Jessica Louise. Note to a girl named 
Mary who probably lives in Santa Monica: 
Please write to Miss Durbin, c/o Universal 
Studios, identifying yourself as to the place 
you saw Miss Durbin and suggested the 
name. Other girls named Mary, who live in 
Santa Monica, need not answer, because only 
if the writer tells correctly where, when, and 
on what occasion the name was suggested, 
will Miss Durbin follow a plan she has. 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Jinx Falkenburg and Tex McCreary are 
preparing a nursery for an inhabitant due 
in the summer of 1946. 

Eddie Bracken's new son has been named 
Michael Edward. Young Mike has two 
sisters, Judith Ann who is now 3, and Carolyn 
Jean who is 15 months old. 

Hume Cronyn (whom you will admire enor¬ 
mously in "Letter For Evie") and Jessica 
Tandy finished their work in "The Green 
Years" at Metro, hopped into a car and raced 
for the hospital where they were rewarded 
by the birth of a little girl who will be named 
Candy Cronyn. 

Remember "Three Martini" in "The Story 
of Dr. Wassell"? Her name is now Carol 
Thurston Thayer, following her marriage to 
Lt. Colonel David S. Thayer. Jr„ of Houston, 
Texas. After the honeymoon. Carol will be 
required to return to Hollywood for some 
added scenes in "Swamp Fire," her latest 
picture opposite Johnny Weissmuller. 

Frances Ramsden, currently getting her 
first break in "The Sin Of Harold Diddlebock," 
has been sued for divorce by her husband. 
Paul E. de Loqueyssie, who has also de¬ 
manded that she pay his legal expenses. 

Most matrimonial family in Hollywood in 
months was that of the house of Davis. Bette's 
mother, Mrs. Ruth Favor Davis became the 
bride of Mr. Robert Woodbury Palmer one 
week, and Bette herself stepped to the altar 
of the chapel in Riverside's Mission Inn, a 
week later. Observed Bette as she prepared 
to become the wife of Mr. William Grant 
Sherry (recently discharged from the Navy). 
(Continued on page 93) 



Close narmony: Ked bkelton and the new Mrs. dine out with his former wife-agent the 
day after she married Frank Borzage. He’s directing "I've Always Loved You" for Rep.' 













n 







A S/x- fetter Word 



Stronger Grip 

. . . Watch your "Good-looks 
Score" go up and up when 
you use DeLong Bob Pins to 
give your hair-do that smooth, 
new uncluttered look. 

It’s the "Stronger Qrip ' in 
DeLong Bob Pins that makes 
them so different from bob 
pins of the wishy-washy type... 


Stronger Grip 

Won’t Slip Out 



Quality Manufacturers for Over 50 years 

BOB PINS HAIR PINS SAFETY PINS 
SNAP FASTENERS STRAIGHT PINS 
HOOKS a EYES HOOK & EYE TAPES 

SANITARY BELTS 



EDITOR 



Dear Sir: 

Would you please take time to look 
at the expression that is on the face 
of the little boy in this snapshot? It 
is identical with that of one of my 
favorite actors—Thomas Mitchell. 

E. K. Cleary 
Chicago, Ill. 

There’s no doubt about it, Mr. Cleary! 

Dear Miss Cline: 

I saw Don DeFore in the “Affairs of 
Susan.” I liked it very much. I saw 
June Lockhart in “Son of Lassie” and 
I thought she was rather pretty. I 
liked Peter Lawford, too. I like school 
but I think the teacher I have is rather 
boring and so do the other girls in my 
class. There are 19 children in the 
class altogether and of that 4 (not 
counting me) are girls and the rest are 
boys. Big class, isn’t it? 

Sincerely, 

Babs Becker 
Little Silver, N. J. 

It certainly is! Better luck next term 
with your new teacher. 

Dear Miss Cline: 

Your Oct. issue of Movieland was 
so very good, particularly because of 
“This Is Myself,” by Frank Sinatra. 
Thanks so much. “Words of Music” 
was nice to Frank, too. The large pic¬ 
ture of Frank is fine—so nice for our 
scrapbooks. 

Sincerely yours, 

Doris M. Palumbo 
Lebanon, N. H. 

Thanks for the kind words. We’re 
proud of Frankie too, for the fine work 
he’s doing all over the country with his 
lectures on Tolerance. Have you seen 
the RKO short, “The House I Live 
In . . .” and did you know that Sinatra 
was given a special “outstanding contri¬ 
bution’’ award by the Hollywood 
Women’s Press Club? 


Dear Sir: 

While looking through a recent 
issue of Movieland I came across 
your article, “Foreshadowing Your 
Home.” You have a picture of the in¬ 
terior of the farmhouse from the 
movie, “Christmas in Connecticut.” 

When I saw the movie, I sort of 
placed that home as my dream house. 

For quite some time now I have 
been looking for detailed information 
about the house as a whole. 

Could you send me some pictures 
similar to those in your article, and 
also a plan of the house! If not, could 
you advise me as to where I could 
find such information? 

Sincerely, 
Charlene Reid 
Chicago, III. 

If you will write to Mr. Leo Kuter, 
Warner Bros. Pictures, Burbank, Calif., 
I’m sure he will be able to help you. 

Dear Miss Cline: 

I enjoyed your article “Sub-Six¬ 
teen” in the November issue. I am 
twelve years old and very interested 
in young starlets about my age. More 
stories, please, about young starlets. 

Sincerely, 

Mae Zetlin 
Washington, D. C. 

Look for a sub-sixteen article on 
Sharon MacManus in a near-future issue. 

Dear Sirs: 

Please send all future issues of 
Movieland magazine, on my subscrip¬ 
tion, to my home address: H. E. Mc¬ 
Kinley Jr., Bean Station, Tennessee. 

The reason for the change in ad¬ 
dress amounts to a total of 83 points. 

Sincerely, 

S/Sgt. H. Evan McKinley 
c/o Postmaster 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Welcome home, Mr. McKinley; We’re 
glad to have you back. 

Dear Doris Cline: 

In your “Pictures in Production,” at 
M-G-M, you told of “The Yearling” in 
production. 

What I want to know is could you 
inform me of the producer and di¬ 
rector of that movie. I cannot thank 
you enough. 

The story and pictures on Helmut 
Dantine were wonderful and those 
beautiful color portraits of Phyllis 
Thaxter and Guy Madison were out 
of this world. 

Sincerely, 

Richard Donovan, Jr. 

Mount Morris, N. Y. 

Sidney Franklin is the producer and 
Clarence Brown the director of “The 
Yearling.” 









THOSE END! 









13 











Also some fra* 
grance; Eau de 
Cologne, Dusting 
Powder, Talc, 
Sachet, Soap. 


Ca ptures 
the soothing 
loveliness of 
the exotic, 
romantic 
So uth Sea 
Islands. 

Salts, 1 lb. $1.00 
Liquid, 8 oz.$ 1.00 



MATTHEW PRODUCTS, INC. 

117 East 24th Street • New York 10, N. Y„ 



So Proudly We Hail 


This is the fifth in a series of special features dedi¬ 
cated to Hollywood’s war veterans and men still in service 
—keeping up with the stars who’ve been away, and report¬ 
ing on the many who might have been stars by now if their 
careers hadn't been interrupted. 


WAYNE MORRIS is back! At the moment, however, his 
chief interest as a civilian is to become acquainted with the 
new girl in his life—a cute baby daughter, born while he 
was overseas. Wayne did a fine job in the war as a lieu¬ 
tenant in the Navy; his record shows the Distinguished Fly¬ 
ing Cross, the Navy Cross, a Gold Star and an Air Medal. 
His studio (W.B.) has big plans for the Morris screen career— 
another “Brother Rat,” maybe? 

* * * * 

After two years of real down-to-the-ground-and-no-fooling 
service in the Coast Guard, handsome RICHARD QUINE 
is back before the M-G-M cameras. 

Dick had such pictures as “The Human Comedy” and 
“Stand By for Action” to his credit, and his star was really 
ascending, when he made the decision to shelve his ambitions 
for the duration. He not only signed with the Coast Guard, 
but he took unto himself a wife, the lovely Susan Peters. 

Now, with Susan and a role in “But Not Good-bye,” it 
looks like smooth sailing ahead for civilian Richard Quine. 

* * * 

A naval lieutenant in charge of a gun crew has been JOHN 
SHEPPERD’S occupation since January, 1943, and “. . . the 
Armed Guard Division was certainly a far cry from ‘The 
Loves of Edgar Allan Poe’,” says John. 

* * * 

TIM HOLT, captain in the Army Air Corps, will shortly be 
just plain Tim Holt, movie actor. He’s been away for a long 
time—four years—but his splendid work in Orson Welles’ 
“Citizen Kane” isn’t forgotten. He’ll do a pic for RKO soon. 



14 















15 








WILL YOU WEAR THIS LOVELY 



The picture at left shows the jumper worn as a smart 
cap-sleeved dress without blouse. 

10 DAYS’ TRIAL! 

Wear this Jumper and blouse at MY RISK If in 10 
days you are not completely satisfied, return for full 
refund. 

DOUBLE-DUTY-DOUBLE-BEAUTY! 

4 LOVELY COLORS 

A Jaunty Jumper and Smart Dress all in one! That’s 
the newest Bonnie Gaye fashion created in Holly¬ 
wood to thrill you with its enchanting figure flattery. 
Wear it with the crisp high neckline blouse as a 
jumper ... or as a smart cap-sleeved dress without the 
blouse. Fashioned in a crisp, fine quality all season 
fabric; slenderizing waist-band; smart stitching ’round 
the neck and down the front; full skirt with pleat all 
make it style perfect! Sizes 12 through 20 and only 
$7.98 plus postage. An original Bonnie Gaye created 
in Hollywood. 

BLOUSE: A heart.stealer with high round neckline 
and smart gathered fullness. Long sleeves. Lustrous 
rayon. White only. Sizes 32 to 40. Only $3.98 plus 
postage. 

SEND NO MONEY—Check size and color choice 
and mail coupon. Pay postman C.O.D. charges. If 
after 10 days you are not satisfied return for full refund 

For Prompt Delivery Rush This Coupon! 

BONNIE GAYE FASHIONS—Dept. 1-C 
168 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1, Ill. 

■ Please send smart 2-WAY JUMPER. I’ll pay 
postman $7.98 plus postage on arrival with un¬ 
derstanding I may return purchase for full re- 

I fund if not satisfied in 10 days. (Mark 1st and 
| 2nd choice color selection). 

I Navy □ Brown □ Aqua □ Black □ 

| (Circle Size) 

12 14 16 18 20 

I Please send BLOUSE at $3.98 plus postage. 

| (White only) (Circle Size). 

32 34 36 38 40 

Name.... 

Address. 

City.Zone.... State. 

■ Note: Order 2 Jumpers for only $14.50 plus 
postage. □ 



"The Al Jolson Story" (Col.) stars Larry Parks, 
with Evelyn Keyes in role of dancer Ruby Keeler. 


ONE YEAR AGO 

Robert Taylor became a full lieu¬ 
tenant . . . The critics praised Shirley 
Temple’s grown-up pretending in 
“I’ll Be Seeing You” . . . Jane 
Withers’ best beau was Ross Hunt¬ 
er .. . Red Skelton entertained and 
wowed the troops in Italy . . . Robert 
Walker squiring Diana Lynn . . 
“Valley of Decision,” outstanding pic¬ 
ture of the month . . . Ida Lupino and 
Helmut Dantine dating . . . Every¬ 
one, including Garbo, developing a 
passion for painting . . . Lana Turner 
concentrating on Turhan Bey . . . The 
town’s glamour girls showered Hedy 
Lamarr with gorgeous gifts for her 
June baby . . . Esther Williams and 
Ben Gage very much in love . . . 
Betty Hutton and Barry Fitzgerald 
going places and doing things—just 
for laughs . . . Spencer Tracy plan¬ 
ning his return to the Broadway 
stage. 

FIVE YEARS AGO 

Jimmy Stewart sending yellow 
roses every week to Olivia de Havil- 
land . . . Vivian Leigh and Laurence 
Olivier quit Hollywood to battle for 
Britain . . . Ingrid Bergman was 
named for the part of Maria in “For 


Whom the Bell Tolls” . . . Dorothy 
Lamour and attorney Greg Bautzer 
romancing . . . “The Great Lie” was 
another Bette Davis triumph . . . 
Gene Tierney inspiring Rudy Vallee’s 
love songs . . . Betty Grable’s figure 
was judged the most perfect in Holly¬ 
wood . . . Everyone talking about 
Orson Welles’ “Citizen Kane” . . . 
Hollywood wondering if Bill Holden 
and' Brenda Marshall would ever 
marry. 

TEN YEARS AGO 

Al Jolson starred in the “Singing 
Kid” . . . Al’s wife, Ruby Keeler, was 
dancing her way through “Colleen,” 
opposite Dick Powell . . . Jean Har¬ 
low had an ice rink built in the base¬ 
ment of her home . . . Robert Taylor 
doing the town with a different girl 
each nfght . . . Studio bosses turning 
a deaf ear to Ginger Rogers’ plea for 
dramatic roles . . . Henry Fonda 
played opposite ex-wife Margaret 
Sullavan in “The Moon’s Our Home” 
. . . Sylvia Sidney, starring in “The 
Trail of the Lonesome Pine,” divorced 
Bennett Cerf . . . The critics raved 
about Freddie Bartholomew as “Lit¬ 
tle Lord Fauntleroy” . . . David Niven 
beauing Merle Oberon. 


\ L 




























mw/f &?/&£ mws z>/tvs 




0 * • 



So much love, 
yet love’s a 
luxury... to 
be indulged at 

dawn and dusk. 

* 

So modern ... 
millions are 
living it today! 


with 


R K O 
RADIO 


MARK STEVENS 
ROSEMARY DeCAMP • HENRY MORGAN 
WALLY BROWN • 'ARLINE JUDGE 


Produced by 


WILLIAM PEREIRA • Directed by JOHN BERRY 

Screen Play by HUGO BUTLER 




■ , : 



m i 

-v: 





1871-1946 . . . 75th YEAR . . . SETTING STYLES 


18 


MDULMD’S CROSSWORD PUZZLE 


1 . 

5. 

10 . 

14. 

15. 

16. 

17. 

18. 

19. 

20 . 
22 . 

23. 

24. 

26. 

28. 

30. 

31. 

32. 

34. 

37. 

40. 

41. 

42. 

45. 

47. 

48. 


ACROSS 

'’Irene” in "Why Girls 
Leave Home” 

"Gloria” in "The Lost 
Weekend” 

Randolph Scott in "Captain 
Kidd” 

"Marty” in 54 down 
Ginger in "Weekend at the 
Waldorf” 

She sings in "Ziegfeld 
Follies” 

Asafetida 

"Robin Hood of the 


Wild beast’s den 

.Pryor 

Mr. Colman, familiarly 
(anag.) 

"The Kid from Brooklyn" 
"Ellen” in "A Game of 
Death" 

"Agatha Dunham" in "Pur¬ 
suit to Algiers" 

"Johnny Riggs" in "Yo¬ 
landa and the Thief” 
(inits.) 

"Susette” in "This Love of 
Ours” 

"Monte Jarrad” in "Along 
Came Jones" 

"Nona” in "Uncle Harry" 
(inits.) 

"Speed” in "Man Alive" 

"Graham” is.role in 

"Strange Confession” 
Donna 

Filmed a movie scene 

"Danny” is.role in 

73 across 

Cesar . 

Mr. Sparks in short 

"- - - Vines Have Tender 

Grapes” 


50. A popular movie 

51. Farmer in 48 across (inits.) 

52. Binnie Barnes in The 
Spanish Main" 

53. - - - - Laurel (anag.) 

55. "Karin” in "This Love of 
Ours” 

58. Ray is "• - - Hugh Marcy" 
in "Kitty” 

60. "Francisca” in "The Span¬ 
ish Main" 

64. "Bunny” in "Week-end at 
the Waldorf” (anag.) 

65. Interlace 

67. "Prince Nikki” in 43 down 

68 . Reginald Owen in "Cap¬ 
tain Kidd” 

69. Keenly desirous 

70. Three (German) 

71. Ku Klux- 

72. Harold. 

73. "-on a Train" (anag.) 

DOWN 

1. Bert - - - - 

2. Vaudeville in a burlesque 
show 

3. Bruce Bennett in "Danger 
Signal” 

4. Dorothy Lamour in "Mas¬ 
querade in Mexico” 

5. Dieterle was - - - of "This 
Love of Ours” (abbr.) 

6 . John Carradine in "Captain 
Kidd” 

7. "Maisie Goes to - - - -” 

8 . "Clio Dulaine” in "Sara¬ 
toga Trunk” 

9. Arnold cannot - - - in "The 
Hidden Eye” 

10. Radio singer in "Senorita 
from the West” 


11. "Donald Martin” in "An¬ 
chors Aweigh" 

12. "Julia” in "My Name is 
Julia Ross” (anag.) 

13* Claudette in "Guest Wife 
21. Lauren Bacall in "Confiden¬ 
tial Agent” 

23. With Alice in "Fallen 
Angel" 

25. Ingrid’s role in "The Bells 
of St. Mary's” 

27. "Capt. Hollis” in "Week¬ 
end at the Waldorf” 

28. "Chris” in "Guest Wife" 

29. "Mr. Archer" is - - - - role 
in "Kiss and Tell” 

32. Dinah. 

33. Mary. 

35. Electrical resistance unit 

36. Cyprinoid fish, of Europe 

38. Distinctive doctrine 

39 . "-Wouldn't Say Yes" 

43. "And Then There Were 

»» 

44. "Blood on the - - 

45. Old-time movie dog 

46. "Whitey Colton" in "Allot¬ 
ment Wives” 

49. Shut close again 

50. "The.Girls” 

52. Peggy’s pa in "Junior Miss” 

54. ".Lady” 

55. Cecil Kellaway in "Love 
Letters” 

56. Rosemary --(anag.) 

57. - - - - avis 

59. Villain in "Othello” 

61. Aroma of flowers 

62. Movie short 

63. Parched 

65. -Ayres (anag.) 

66 . - - - Skelton (anag.) 


(For Solution See Page 91) 


1 

2 

3 

4 

14 




17 




20 





21 


5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

15 




! 

16 




J 


,0 

II 

12 

»3 

f 






































































































































Smooth soft skin 
wins Romance" 


Lovely star of 
Metro-Gold wyn-Mayers’ 

"The Postman 
Always Rings Twice 






'My Beauty Facials 
bring quick 

new loveliness" 

Feels like smoothing beauty in 
when you cover your face with 
Lux Toilet Soap’s creamy Active 
L lather the way Lana Turner does. 
Work it well in, rinse with warm 
water, then cold. Patwith a towel to 
dry. Now skin is softer, smoother, 
takes on radiant new loveliness. 

Don’t let neglect cheat you of 
Romance. This gentle beauty care 
screen stars recommend will make 
you lovelier tonight! 


In recent tests of Lux Toilet Soap facials by 
skin specialists, actually three out of four com¬ 
plexions improved in a short time! 


9 out of 10 Screen Stars use Lux Toilet Soap 


19 





Your Easter Suit 

*12.20 

plus postage 


Win compliments throughout the spring 
...wear this glamorous suit wherever you 
go. All wool Shetland in pastel colors! 
Sizes 12 to 20. 

ORDER BY MAIL! PROMPT DELIVERY! 

Guaranteed satisfaction! Refunds or exchanges if 
you're not completely satisfied. 

We send C.O.D., or you may save C.O.D. charges 
by mailing a money order for $12.50 which in¬ 
cludes postage and handling. 

SARANNE FIFTH AVENUE 

246 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 1, N. Y. 

SARANNE FIFTH AVENUE De P'- M j 

246 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 1, N. Y. 
j Please send me “Glitter-’N-Glamour” Suit at J 
j $12.20 plus postage 

I Sizes: 12 14 16 18 20 (circle size wanted). . 
! GoldQ Mint! | Powder BlueQ BlackQ [ 
Amer. Beautyl I 

(Mark 1st and 2nd color choice) 

I NAME- 

I STREET,_ 

I CITY—_ZONE-STATE- 

20 -- 1 



THE DIARY OF A CHAMBERMAID (Bene¬ 
dict Bogeaus Production, released thru United 
Artists) —A blonde Paulette Goddard 
shows her versatility in this period 
piece about a maid from Brittany. 
Although no one steals the Goddard 
glory, every performance is perfec¬ 
tion in its overtones and underplay¬ 
ing. Settings, costumes and acting 
maintain a high key throughout. 
A bewhiskered Burgess Meredith 
prances about in the delightful role 
of a demented retired captain, tooting 
on whistles and watched over by 
Florence Bates, his maid and pro¬ 
tector. Malevolent Judith Anderson 
rules the Lanlaire household, which 
includes her henpecked husband Regi¬ 
nald Owen. She cannot conquer the 
spirit of her son, Hurd Hatfield, al¬ 
though his body is broken by con¬ 
sumptive coughs. Irene Ryan’s droll 
portrayal of a slatternly, beaten scul¬ 
lery maid will get sympathy and ac¬ 
colades. Francis Lederer, too, is 
outstanding as a menacing butler with 
the eyes and heart of a thief. Burgess 
Meredith not only acts but is co-pro¬ 
ducer and wrote the screenplay for 
this different and diverting film of 
days gone by. Directed with artistry 
by Jean Renoir. 

THE SAILOR TAKES A WIFE (MGM)— 

The trials and tribulations of a hasty 
marriage are finally ironed out by 
bride and groom June Allyson and 
Robert Walker. One of the trials 
and/or tribulations is refugee Audrey 
Totter who manages to heave a mean 
matrimonial wrench; but true love 
wins out, of course. 

TOMORROW IS FOREVER (Int. released 
thru RK0) —Locale, Baltimore during 
the period from 1918 to 1939. A not too 
subtle philosophy fills this film about 
the badly scarred veteran of World 
War I, who returns to this country af¬ 
ter 20 years of European living to find 
Americans again closing their eyes 
to events happening outside their 
own continental boundaries. Orson 
Welles does a fine job as the crippled 
vet who, without divulging his real 
identity, tries to convince his*one-time 
wife, Elizabeth (Claudette Colbert), 
that the past is unimportant but the 
future, as typified by the ideals of her 
son, Richard Long, will make living 
again worthwhile. George Brent is 
adequate as the solid citizen who 
married Elizabeth after the “death” 


of her husband, but all performances 
are overshadowed by the Welles char¬ 
acterization. Not soon to be forgotten 
spots also are provided by young 
Richard Long, in a first screen appear¬ 
ance, and little Natalie Wood. 

UP GOES MAISIE (MGM) —Ann Sothern’s 

provocative Maisie continues to get 
in and out of hot water. This time 
it has to do with secret plans for 
a speedy helicopter, with Hillary 
Brooke, Horace McNally and Ray 
Collins out to swipe same. George 
Murphy is the inventor and current 
Maisie flame. 

THE GENTLEMAN MISBEHAVES (Colum¬ 
bia) —Show business and New York 
night life get a going over by Robert 
Stanton, Osa Massen, Hillary Brooke 
and Dusty Anderson. It’s an old story 
with some attractive newcomers mak¬ 
ing their bid in a “B” picture. 

A LETTER FOR EVIE (MGM)is a little 

gem of entertainment which spots the 
lovely Marsha Hunt and exploits the 
previously undeveloped comedy flair 
of Hume Cronyn. Factory girls mak¬ 
ing shirts for the U. S. Army stuff 
letters into the pockets of the shirts. 
Evie’s correspondence leads to count¬ 
less complications when the corre¬ 
spondents finally get around to meet¬ 
ing, but the eventual outcome is a 
nice romance. John Carroll, Spring 
Byington, Pamela Britton and Nor¬ 
man Lloyd are pleasant additions to 
the cast. 

ROAD TO UTOPIA (Paramount) —The 
fourth “Road” pic starring the can’t- 
miss combination of Bing Crosby, 
Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour is a 
delightful movie satire which takes 
time out to kid not only the stars, but 
the movie industry as well. “Utopia” 
sends its zany characters to Alaska in 
search of a gold mine. This means a 
series of hilarious jams with time out 
for the trio to (individually and joint¬ 
ly) dispose of six new songs. Douglas 
Dumbrille, Hillary Brooke, Jack La 
Rue have their innings as the gold rush 
“baddies.” 

(Continued on page 96) 





Hope and Crosby keep going in "Road to 
Utopia," their fourth "Road" pic. 




















If You Join 

"America'* Bigg** *"« oin 


T.TERE is an amazing offer from “America’s Biggest Bargain 
Book Club”! Select TWO FREE BOOKS from the six 
shown below. Choose any ONE of these three sensational best¬ 
sellers—PLUS any ONE of these three world masterpieces. 
BOTH books are yours Absolutely FREE—as new membership 
gifts! Take advantage of this sensational offer NOW! 


LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN 


SHORT STORIES OF 

DE MAUPASSANT 

OVER 50 TALES OF LOVE AND PASSION! 
Exciting tales of love, hate, intrigue, pas¬ 
sion. madness and jealousy—all complete 
and unexpurgated, the frankest, most dar¬ 
ing stories of their 
kind ever written! 

Read, in Ball-of-Fat 
of the buxom girl of 
easy virtue—and what 
she did! Read Love, 

Mademoiselle Fifi, 

Story of a Farm Girl, 

—all the best works 
that have made De- 
Maupassant “father of 
the modern short 
story.” 


»»»*: 


By Ben Ames Williams 

THE EIGHTH DEADLY SIN! What 
shall be done with a beautiful woman 
whose insane jealousy leads her to 
stop at nothing? Read 
JSSBfe. the answer in this thrill- 

STmI ing story of a woman 

who gave too little and 
took too much — who 
lied, cheated, deceived. 
8§k “Will hypnotize you.” 

Y. Times. Over 
ONE MILLION copies 
published! 


Rachel — who avenged 
France because of one 
German kiss! 


TALES FROM THE 

DECAMERON 

By Boccaccio 

TEEMING WITH RIOT¬ 
OUS LIFE AND LAUGH¬ 
TER! These sly tales have 
rocked the world with 
lusty laughter since the 
day they were written! A 
gleeful gallery of sinning 
“saints” and saintly “sin¬ 
ners”—men in love, women 
who pretend they are: 
outraged husbands and 
lovers, “innocent” wives, 
clever suitors. 

Told with all the daring 
skill of literature’s most 
robust tongue-in-cheek 
teller of tales! 


Love is the only 
commandment — 
betrayal the only 

tin/ 


GREEN DOLPHIN STREET 


By Elizabeth Goudge 

WINNER OF $125,000 M-G-M PRIZE 
NOVEL CONTEST! Exiled from 
England, handsome William Ozanne 
sends for his sweetheart Marguer¬ 
ite. But through his own foolish 
mistake, it is her 
SISTER who sails 
Xhalfway round the 
^■ world to marry him! 
Shall he confess his 
horrible error—or live 
- • a secret lie for the rest 


By Charlotte Bronte 

WHAT TERRIBLE SECRET 
CURSED THEIR LOVE? Passionate, 
daring story of a man 
who spent his life 
seeking a woman he 
could love. 

His wife was driven 
mad by her own ex¬ 
cesses. Then—a French 
dancing girl, a Viennese 
milliner, a Neapolitan 
countess — and at last 
the one woman he 
adored—a girl barely 
more than a child. What 
terrible secret tore them 
apart? 


Orson Writes. Joan 
Fontaine in 
CEXTURY - FOX 
Motion Pieiurt 
'Jane Eyre." 


and 

I ALSO choose 

f ANY ONE OF 

.. ™ £S£ great 

MASTERPIECES 


Which 2 Do You Want FREE? 


N OW is the most opportune moment of all to 
begin your membership in the Book League 
of America! Because NOW—New Members are 
entitled to a FREE COPY of any one of three 
widely acclaimed best-sellers (shown at left, 
above), and at the same time, ALSO A FREE 
COPY of any one of THREE recognized world 
masterpieces (shown at the right, above). TWO 
BOOKS FREE—just for joining “America's Big¬ 
gest Bargain Book Club’ r ! 

The Best of the New—AND of fhe Old 

Each month ONE of the Book League’s selec¬ 
tions is a modern best-seller by a famous author 
like Ben Ames Williams, Somerset Maugham, 
Ernest Hemingway—selling for $2.50 and up in 
the publisher’s edition. 

AND EVERY MONTH YOU RECEIVE A 
BONUS BOOK—a masterpiece of immortal lit¬ 
erature. These classics are uniformly bound 
They grow into a handsome lifetime matched 
library. The great authors in this series include 
Shakespeare, Poe, Balzac, Zola, etc. 

This club builds for you a library containing 
the best of the new best-sellers AND the best 
of the older masterpieces. 


You Do NOT Have to Take Every Selection 

The NEW book plus the BONUS book sent you 
each month are valued at $3.50 to $4.00 in the 
publisher's edition. But you get BOTH for 
only $1.49! 

You do NOT have to accept each monthly 
selection and BONUS book; only’ six of your oivn 
choice during the year to fulfill your member¬ 
ship requirement. There are no membership 
dues: no further cost or obligation. 

Accept This Trial Membership—No Obligation 

Send the coupon without money. Simply write 
on the coupon your choice from each of the 
two groups of books shown above. Read these 
two gift books for five days. If they do not 
convince you that this IS “America's Biggest 
Bargain Book Club,” simply return them; pay 
nothing. But if these volumes DO demonstrate 
tha* subscribing to the Book League is the 
wisest move a reader can make today, then 
keen them as a gift; your subscription will be¬ 
gin with next month’s new selection and BONUS 
book. Mail counon for your TWO FREE BOOKS 
NOW! BOOK LEAGUE OF AMERICA. Dept. 
HWG-3. Garden City. N. Y. 


Mail this 
coupon to 

BOOK LEAGUE OF AMERICA 

Dept. HWG-3, Garden City, N. Y. 

Send me—FREE—these 2 books (write TITLES below): 


(Choose one from best-sellers at left of page» 


(Choose one from claassics shown directly abovei 
Within 5 days I may return them if I wish, without I 
cost or obligation. Otherwise. I will keep them as a eift. ■ 
and continue to receive forthcoming new monthly selec- ■ 
tions and BONUS books—at only $1.49 plus few cents I 
postage for BOTH books. ■ 

However. I do NOT have to accept each month’s new ■ 
selection and BONUS book: only six of my own .choice I 
during the year to fulfill my membership requirement. ■ 

There are no membership dues for me to pay: no further ■ 
cost or obligation. I 

MR. 1 ■ 

MRS. > . | 

MISS » (Please print plainly) 

ADDRESS..... | 

Zone No. 

CITY. (if any).STATE. ■ 

Age, please I 

Occupation.if under 21. I 

□ HANDSOME DF LUXE BINDING: Check box if you wish ■ 
your masterpieces (monthly BONUS books) in simulated 
leather, silver stamped, for only 40c extra monthly We B 
will then also send you. in this same binding, your FREE ■ 
conv of the classic you choose. 

Slightly higher in Canada.Address 105 8ond St..Toronto 2,Can I 

I... 4 3 

































so 

Your Hands 



When he reaches for your hands 
they’ll be thrillingly smooth and 
soft to the touch ifyou use SOFSKIN 
CREME. You can rely on soothing 
SOFSKIN tokeepyourhandslovely- 
to hold straight through winter’s 
chapping cold. For hands, wrists, 
elbows and ankles, use non-sticky 
SOFSKIN, the creme that many 
beauticians prefer. A wonderful 
powder foundation, too. 



In the Black and Gold jars 
35* 60* $1.00 sizes* 
’Plus tax 

Ash for the free Sofskin 
demonstration at your beauty 
salon or cosmetic counter 


sottkin cR^rm 





Sultry, heady, rich and lush! 
Well, what did you expect in a 
perfume called FOREVER AM¬ 
BER? Created by Kay Daumit 
to be the essence of excitement, 
it comes in a dram ($1.75) or 
two and a half dram size ($3.'75). 
The precious-looking packages 
are of rose-tinted lucite. Match¬ 
ing Forever Amber Cologne ap¬ 
pears in a gold-crested bottle 
for $2.50. 

Stockings are sheerer, legs must 
look to their looks. The basis 
of undimmed loveliness for 
underpinnings is smooth and 
completely hair-free skin. For 
depilatory users comes word of 
the recently improved formula 
of famous X-BAZIN. The new 
X-Bazin has not a trace of un¬ 
pleasant odor, but is lightly 
scented for pleasanter applica¬ 
tion. A five ounce tube is $1. 

Winter winds have a way of 
leaving lips c-happed and 
cracked. For that matter, so does 
summer sun. That’s why the 
Harper Method WHITE LIP¬ 
STICK should be a good all- 
year investment. It contains 
ingredients to prevent dryness 
and chapping. 1 AS it soothes, it 
forms a longer lasting, smooth 
and suede-y lipstick foundation. 
$ 1 . 

The CHIC DE LUXE CREME 
COLD WAVE kit offers luxury 
within anyone’s limits. This 
home permanent wave set holds 
the professional type of ingredi¬ 
ents that are mild enough for 
even bleached or baby fine hair. 
The whole home operation takes 
between two and three hours 
from shampooing time to the 
beautiful brush-out. Quick to do, 
long to last and only 79c. 

Made to measure because they 
are made to measure up to teen¬ 
age girls own standards! That’s 
the story behind TEENTIMER 
COSMETICS. The results are as 
gay as they are good for groom¬ 
ing. Essential accessories carry 
cute names. (Lipstick is “Lip- 
Trix” and cologne is “Heavenly 
H a O.”) Packaging is young and 
pretty. Prices are practical. 

“DANGER SIGNAL,” latest lip¬ 
stick shade from the House of 
Westmore, should be a “safe 
bet” for every type of wearer. 
That’s because the color is a 
bright, clear red-red that was 
made to blend with a blonde, 
accent muted tones or compli¬ 
ment the dark drama of the 
brunette. Practically a lipstick 
wardrobe to harmonize with any 
wardrobe. Either 25c or 50c. 



KIDMETICS, a circus for the younger set! 
And Irene Blake's formula for the four to 
fourteen, boy or girl. Both skin and hair 
care items, directions that rhyme. 59c ea. 



A scientific "solution 11 for splitting nails. 
It's TRIMAL, non-acid, non-drying polish re¬ 
mover, made to preserve both nails and the 
life and luster of their lacquer. Just 25c. 



Contributions to colorful charm are the 
smartly styled new CLOUDSILK lipsticks. In 
gleaming gold metal and black plastic they 
come in a bright range of six shades. $1.50. 



Lentheric's Soft-Focus CREME SATINEE, 
the fulfillment of three vital functions. This 
fluffy cream lathers in water to cleanse, 
soften and leave a silky powder base. $1. 


SOFSKIN COMPANY FINDLAY. OHIO 

















jssyas 

r/ gfi\.s 

,er ° m from “Show' 

mUSlC _ per-smooth 

neW * hv Tommy 

moots / Lol , e Y' 
Why D ° 1 , r>at M 

H ‘>P '-"X/, Sliii ■ 

Bella*. A“ yol 

or Mo" 

*« *«• 


OLONMSE’ 

aL GOODMAN^ 0f 

Loists,marhyt£o tunes 

„ of seven tm v show: 

otn the -F \Zle;0 Hear A t0f r 
olonaise, F fonder As I 
\y Country’IJ Just For 
Yonder; ^i Know You- 
ranight; Now t he nev 

Face By/S'f Co«- s ®“ 

PfSuSp-l^.* 2 - 50 ' 


at your dealer’s... on the radio...on juke boxes 
Eddy Arnold • Bill Boyd • Elton Britt • Perry Como • Johnny Desmond 
Tommy Dorsey • Duke Ellington • The Ginger Snaps #A1 Goodman • Erskine 
Hawkins • Lena Horne • Spike Jones • Sammy Kaye • Wayne King • Freddy 
Martin • Vaughn Monroe • Roy Rogers • David Rose • Dinah Shore 
Sons of the Pioneers • Charlie Spivak • Martha Stewart • Billy Williams 
listen to The RCA Victor Show, Sundays, 4:30 p.m.. Eastern Time, NBC. 


THE WORLD’S GREATEST ARTISTS ARE ON 


RCA^/lCTOR RECORDS 


Prices are suggested list 
prices exclusive of toxes 


23 











MGM star Jean Pierre 
Aumont’s war memoirs will 
be published soon. He's 
scheduled to do Rimsky- 
Korsakov role tor Univ. 



READING 

WRITING 


By HELEN KING 




What hits your eye the minute 
you look at the signature of Jean 
Pierre Aumont? The “broken” ef¬ 
fect. It looks as though the popular 
French actor deliberately separated 
every letter he wrote. But it wasn’t 
deliberation, not to graphologists. 
It tells that the gentleman is highly 
intuitive, that he can “have a 
hunch,” or judge by a first impres¬ 
sion immediately. None of this 
waiting months to make a decision. 
On first meeting, Jean Pierre knows 
if he likes you, why he likes you, 
and he has an instinctive under¬ 
standing of your problems. Possibly 
this accounts for the sympathetic 
touch he puts into his pictures. 

The next characteristic which 
strikes the eye is the shading of 




DON’T CLIP THIS COUPON! 

Unless you want Helen King to tell you what secrets 
are revealeJ by your handwriting. If so—if you want 
a personal handwriting analysis from one of the fore¬ 
most American graphology experts—send tills coupon 
together with 25c and a sample of your penmanship, 
tohlelen King, care of MOVIELAND MAGAZINE. 535 
Fifth Ave New York 1". N. Y. Enclose a stamped, 
self-addressed envelope. Y'ou will receive a personal 
analysis—no form letters! 

NAME... 

ADDRESS. 

I hereby grant permission for my handwriting analysis 
to be published in a future issue of MOVIELAND 
(Indicate Yes or No). 


strokes: some definitely heavy, 

others very light. Jean Pierre is an 
impatient, and sometimes moody 
individual given to expressing his 
feelings. He likes to see things done 
quickly and dislikes any routine in 
his mode of living (yet it is the very 
thing he needs to offset this tem- 
pestousness). 

Many of us have that upward 
line of writing found in his signa¬ 
ture. It tells of optimism and a 
tendency to look on the brighter 
side of life. An easy way to re¬ 
member this is by a little rule: 
“When the writing goes uphill you 
may be sure the corners of the 
mouth are turned up, thus the 
spirits are up; this is the sign of 
smiling optimism.” 

Now to dissect some of the let¬ 
ters. The capital “A,” semi-printed, 
and high, gives good taste, a con¬ 
structive mind and a protective na¬ 
ture. That oddly shaped “t” at 
the end of the signature shows a 
tendency to hang on to one’s own 
ideas and beliefs. 

Compare the dashing “i”-dots 
with your own. Are they as much 
like commas as Jean’s? If so you 
too have a quick humor and an ap¬ 
preciation for repartee. 

There is a free and easy method 


of expression, as shown by the 
swinging strokes; a desire for in¬ 
dependence, as the tall capital let¬ 
ters reveal; and generosity of both 
mind and action as the “o” which 
is opened at the top. 

You’d find Jean Pierre Aumont 
an interesting man to know; one 
whose actions would always act as 
a magnet and who would amaze you 
by his complete understanding of 
what you were thinking. 

The End 


Do you cross your t’s when you 
come to them? Do you build a 
tent over your i’s in place of a 
dot? Do you forget to close the 
loops in ybur o’s? From such 
tiny clues, 29-year-old Helen 
King, past president of the 
American Graphological Society, 
and leader of the nation’s Sher- 
locks of scribbles, can read your 
character with uncanny accu¬ 
racy. Dynamic, merry and as¬ 
sured, she has helped the New 
York police with countless cases, 
written syndicated newspaper 
columns, magazine articles, 
broadcast for several years, and 
analyzed more than a million 
and a half persons’ handwriting. 














His hate was strong 
but their loves 
were stronger- 


IT'S YOURS! Absolutely FREE 
the book thousands are buy¬ 
ing at $2.50 in the publisher's 
edition! Mail coupon NOW for 
FREE copy of "The Manatee!" 

“A book of genuine literary merit. Miss 
Bruf!"8 honesty and courage makes this a 
book that will stamp itself indelibly on 
your mind."— Chicago Tribune. 

‘‘A lusty, full-blooded novel portraying 
one of the strangest and bitterest mar¬ 
riages in modern Action."— 

Boston Herald. 

"All the speed and violence of a Nan¬ 
tucket gale . . . keeps the reader bolt up¬ 
right in his chair and at the end evokes a 
vehement Whewl"—Nashville Banner. 

“On every page 

there's some inci¬ 
dent to keep you 
tearing through the 
book."— Providence 
General. 

Nancy Bruff, the 
author — of whose 
work the New 
Yorker says: 

"A first novel by 
a writer of unmis¬ 
takable talent." 

v*_ y 


PIETY 

"I pledge you my 
hatred 'til the day I 
die", said Piety to 
Jabez, her husband, 
after he had brutally 
profaned her trusting 
young love. But her 
Quaker love of God 
and her children was 
stronger than his evil. 


SAFFRON 

Lovely — sensitive — 
born of Jabez and 
Piety's strange and 
bitter union —she 
found escape from 
hate and wickedness 
by embracing life 
fiercely— learning to 
love and be loved with 
passionate intensity. 


FLOWERY SHRINE 

Exotic South Seas half- 
caste; sweet as the fra¬ 
grant flower juices with 
which she anointed her 
exquisite body. She rose 
above the unholy lust of 
Jabez, to put meaning 
in the empty soul of his 
handsome son Luke. 


JABEZ-ruthless, violent, powerful 
...only cruelty gave him pleasure! 

"When I inflict pain on others the very base of 
my spine melts in sweet agony." this was 
Jabez' bitter confession to his wife. Piety, on 
the night he killed her love. Harsh to all, bru¬ 
tally impatient with anything that hindered the 
satisfaction of his violent desires, he loved no 
living thing until Old Amos said the burning 
words that set his soul free at last. Mail coupon 
now for your FREE copy of this great novel. 


S ^ CCEPT this sen- 
/u sational best 
' g seller FREE to 
introduce you to 
A The Fiction Book 
Club. Discover for yourself 
why thousands are buying this 
powerful novel right now at 
$2.50. Enjoy every moment of 
its bold sweeping drama of 
vibrant love and corrosive 
hatred. Thrill to the tensely 
emotional story of the life and 
loves of Jabez Folger. Learn 
how Jabez on his first whal¬ 
ing voyage had a dark and 
terrible experience so evil that 
it changed his whole life. 

Yet at intervals Jabez' ten¬ 
der nature returned, and it 


was in one of these rare 
moods that he courted gentle 
Piety—then deliberately mur 
dered hfis young bride's love., 
transformi ng it to a bitter 
hatred. How Jabez was freed 
at last from the evil demon 
that possessed his soul, how 
his spiritual release affected 
his family — whose lives had 
been distorted by his years of 
sin and violence — makes the 
most vivid, exciting and com¬ 
pelling tale you’ve ever read. 

Now—"The Manatee" cur¬ 
rent best-seller at $2.50 in the 
publisher’s edition is yours 
ABSOLUTELY FREE when 
you join The Fiction Book 
Club. MAIL COUPON NOW! 


America's Most Talked-About Best Seller 


With your FREE membership 
in The Fiction Book Club 


the savagely romantic story of that strange 
man, Jabez...the sinister secret in his past 
and how it kindled a passion for the 
Manatee" that no woman could satisfy! 


Membership is FREE in The FICTION BOOKCLUB 

—and you get all these Money-Saving advantages too! 


You will be sent immediately 
FREE your copy of the best¬ 
seller "The Manatee" when you 
mail the coupon. You’ll also 
become a member of The Fic¬ 
tion Book Club with your 
choice of the club's monthly 
best-seller selections and you’ll 
get these four advantages, too: 

I. You save $1 to $2 on every 
book ! Fiction Book Club contracts 
for big special editions — prints 
from original plates and in re¬ 
turn for mass distribution, au¬ 
thors accept lower royalties. 
These savings are passed right 
on to you. You save $1 to $2 on 


every book you get, and you get 
the best-seller, "The Manatee," 
FREE as an introductory gift I 

2. You get outstanding new books! 
Selections are made only after a 
careful study of nationwide cur¬ 
rent best sellers. From these re¬ 
ports of best sellers at $2.50 to 
$3.50, our editors select the avail¬ 
able books that are "the cream of 
the crop." No guesswork. No 
opinions. Fiction Book Club se¬ 
lections are always outstanding 
best-sellers . . . books by lead¬ 
ing authors . . . brand-new. full- 
size, cloth-bound books you will 
be proud to own. 

3. You pay no special dues or 
fees! No trick obligation clauses. 


You simply agree to accept any 
six of the twelve outstanding 
books offered in a year. You do 
not have to accept every book 
offered—just those you decide you 
want after you have read a de¬ 
tailed description well in advance. 

4. You'll find plan so simple and 

easy! If you decide you don't 
want the b.ok simply notify us 
not to send it. Otherwise simply 
do nothing, and it will be mailed 
to you. For each monthly selec¬ 
tion YOU decide you want you 
pay just $1.39 plus a few cents 
postage. 

SO ACT NOW! 

Get your FREE copy of "The 
Manatee"—the book every¬ 
body's talking about and all the 
conveniences and savings of 
free Fiction Book Club mem- 
bership! But hurry—offer is 
limited! It's first come — first 
served. Mail coupon NOW to 
The Fiction Book Club, 31 
West 57th St., New York 19. 


Current Selection! "The Wine of San Lorenzo" 

Big, exciting 472-page romantic novel. High on best-seller lists 
at $3...The story of Maria, the unattainable who fled from her 
husband on her wedding night...defied family, church, conven¬ 
tion... for the strange ^roung man who had drunk the mystic 
Wine of San Lorenzo . . . Chicago Tribune says, "Everything 
readers look for... heroism, villainy, and impassioned love." 


A 


Send No Money! Mail Coupon! 


YOURS FREE-“THE MANATEE'' 

The savagely romantic novel everybody's talking about 

The FICTION BOOK CLUB, 31 W. 57 St., New York 19, N. Y. 

Send me FREE the novel "The Manatee" and also FREE 
give me my fully-privileged membership in The Fiction 
Book Club. Each month you are to offer me a new and 
popular best-seller at only $1.39 (plus a few cents post¬ 
age)—savings to me of $1 to $2 on each book from the 
regular price of the publisher’s edition. (The current 
selection is "Wine of San Lorenzo’’— sensational $3 best¬ 
seller.) However, I can accept or reject monthly selec¬ 
tions as I please. My only agreement is to purchase 6 
out of the entire year’s offerings. Rush my free copy of 
"The Manatee" right away and begin my club service 
with current selection. 

MO-3 

Name __ 


Address _ 

Tone No. 

City - (if any). _ State _ 

(In Canada: 266 King St. West, Toronto) 


MAIL COUPON NOW! HURRY ... OFFER LIMITED! 

























’'Turn away! 

Turn away!” 

"You can’t stop 
loving him!” 

"You can’t, 

You can’t!” 




DARRYL F. ZANUCK 

presents 


GENE TIERNEY 


mwvm 

From the Novel ' by Anya Seton 

with 

WALTER HUSTON 
VINCENT PRICE 


and 

ANNE REVERE * SPRING BYINGTON 
CONNIE MARSHALL* HENRY MORGAN 

Written for the Screen and Directed by JOSEPH L.MANKIEWICZ 



GLENN IANGAN 


20 , * 

. CENTURY-FOX 
PICTURE 


26 
























Oh* you 
nasty DAN! 


By KAY PROCTOR 


Dan Duryea has a problem! 

He has to convince Pete and 

Dick he’s not that mean guy! 




The theater was dark and un¬ 
usually quiet. On the screen a simple 
scene was being played; a tall, slender 
young man was twirling a watch 
chain as he spoke his few lines in a 
soft voice, but one pregnant with 
malice. 

Suddenly a woman in the audience 
spoke, her words clearly audible for 
a dozen rows in either direction. 

“There,” she said vehemently, “is 
the most despicable man I have ever 
seen in my life!” 

A moment later she felt someone 
tugging at her sleeve, and turned to 
hear the woman seated next to her 
say acidly, “Please, madame, you are 
speaking of the man I love!” Startled, 
she glanced quickly at the screen 
villain’s unexpected champion, and 
failing to recognize her, peeked 
openly at the man seated next to the 
unknown woman. “Oh!” she gasped 
in confusion, “pardon me!” For seated 
there, and (Continued on page 60) 


27 



































“If I just had a relative in pictures!” cried a college co-ed, as 
she came away from a fruitless call at a casting director’s office. 
“It’s the only way to get in!” 

Let’s see, now: 

Bing Crosby’s four sons are seen occasionally as a quartet in 
pictures, and Andy Devine’s 11-year-old Tad and 8-year-old 
Dennis are working with their father in “Canyon Passage”. No 
doubt about it, Papa got the kids in. 

From all accounts, if the Crosby boys never enter a studio again, 
it will be too soon to please them. Ted Devine seems to enjoy loca¬ 
tions where he discovers fascinating wood creatures; but not so 
Dennis. That young man, chased by a white-faced cow, slightly 
enciente, declared he was menaced by a “mother bull”. Somewhat 
later, he was directed to eat tapioca pudding for two hours in a 
scene that was difficult to get. Dennis can’t bear tapioca and two 
hours was his limit so he struck—until the dish was replaced with 
chocolate pudding. Oh yes, getting into films was easy—getting 
OUT is what interests Andy’s younger son! (Continued on page 77) 




Rita Lupino (Ida's sis) and hubby 
dance in a Dorothy Lamour pic. 


Dennis and Tad act with dad, 
A. Devine, in "Canyon Passage." 



/ 


trade in—or on the family name. That’s the question! 

By LESLIE TRAEftE 


29 




























I 



One-man factory—he makes toys 
from specifications for his 3 children. 


Seventeen odd 
jobs trained 
Dana Andrews 
to be an actor 


After "Fallen Angel" (20th), he was 
borrowed for "Canyon Passage." 





ATTENTION: EMPLOYERS, 

Need an experienced apiarist? (Bee-handler, 
to you!) 

Or a political reformer? 

A butcher boy, plumber’s assistant, farmer, 
cow puncher, fig picker, or bank clerk? 

Or perhaps an office manager, a motion picture 
projectionist who can dub in sound, a school 
bus driver, a filling station operator? 

Or yet a hitch-hiker, an oil supplies sales¬ 
man, a concrete pipe worker, an irrigation engineer 
(called in some circles a ditch digger)? 

Or maybe an actor? 

Hold everything. Before you make out 
17 separate time cards, may we direct your 
attention to the fact that, to secure the services 
of all these diverse and (Continued on page 68) 


II.\\1>Y 

MAX 

By AVERY CAHROIX 

O 












LUCKY LADY 



Typical American girl, she cultivates casual look by "dressing down. 


Stars in “Lady Luck" opposite Bob Young. 


32 









Bill Williams & Babs, "A Likely Story" 


It might as well lie Spring for 
Barbara Hale. Her career is 

zooming, and love is in the air 

Barbara Hale believes in Fate, predestination, mental telepathy and all 
kinds of things. And, so would you, I betcha, if you were Barbara! 

She can tell you about all these matters and back it up with 
proof right smack out of her own personal experience. The most 
amazing chain of unpredictable circumstances led Barbara to stardom in 
Hollywood, and to one of the most charming romances the tired old film 
capital has seen in goodness knows. 

Suppose you were Barbara, placidly growing up in Rockford, Illinois (her 
family moved there from De Kalb when she was four). Your father 
was a prosperous landscape gardener and you went to grade school 
ind high school. You dabbled a bit with the little theater and studied tap 
lancing without too much enthusiasm because (Continued on page 64) 


By HELEN LOUISE WALKER 


33 











At MGM: 

Jt^on^Sr^Voduc- 

tion, and there a town who 

predict 6 that this t^Scripted 

fSTifig 

sensitive book, tn v Wyman. 
Gregory Peck and ^ Claude 

Others in the casr m Y ork, 

Jarman, Jr. as ^Lockhart, Chill 
Henry Travers, Jumdiffi- 
Wills and Clem B ^ r a "j ntered; the 
culty has been^ en started 

scenes, Blown must 

a wfit d unm the'new crop of fawns 
aP STAE n FROM 6 HEAVEN, f>ein| 

shoUn Cinecdm- is the smry of^a 

colt born in a foxholes in ^ 

ThalfThoml^on^George Tohi^ Jim 

SS ? ’aSTcSSl on page 89) 

By FBEBBA B' BH V 


'A 



2. Zachary Scott, 


in Mexico. 


ind teacher on set 


34 








, VM- u* - « ***“ ’" h M ' W ” 

— ..W «-*■ 


Li 



By GERTRUDE SHAXKLUV 




CHANGE g FACE 

Dorian Gray Is no more— 
Meet Hurd Hatfield, 




1. Home on the hilltop 
is the new, modernisti- 
colly designed "Drag¬ 
on's Lair," with 150-mile 
view. 2. He co-stars with 
Paulette Soddard in 
U. A. pic, "The Diary 
Of a Chambermaid." 
3. Leans toward heavy 
drama, but someday 
he'd like to do a musi¬ 
cal. Favorite g.f. seems 
to be Virginia Hunter. 


One of the best things about “The Diary of a 
Chambermaid” is the chance it gives Hurd Hat¬ 
field to move, live, love, hope, despair, and rejoice 
—even as you and I. (His two previous screen 
appearances had left us wondering whether he 
could!) First he appeared, you remember, as the 
young Chinese son in “Dragon Seed,” with heavy 
Oriental makeup; next as the beautiful zombie¬ 
like Dorian in “The Picture of Dorian Gray.” Both 
were interesting roles from the acting standpoint, 
but they were strange, detached characters that 
struck no familiar note in the average moviegoer’s 
experience. (Continued on page 80 ) 


36 









iw 

n*Vw«* 


mmmWm 

ft 

JgBP^W 















38 












dr °PPod th. 


for 


^eo tried 


*ff« cf. 


By MICKEIX NOVAK 



would be the one girl to gum up the works: l 

there’s nothing pattern about her. Her voice, 
which sounds like distilled moonlight after 7:00 
P.M., comes out soothing, syrup-smooth, not quite “so 

deep as a well,” completely fascinating under the sun. 

Her. hair is mane-thick. It appears to be naturally tawny. It’s well-brushed, 
not-too-well groomed, and awfully attractive. Her hands are in perpetual 

motion. Except when they pause to grasp a teacup (and she uses lemon, if you 
care), or to flick her lighter into flame. These hands—when they rest long enough for 






a good squint—look competent, expressive, utilitarian, 
artistic—all at the same time! She uses them in an 
amazing way; like levers to flip out her thoughts into 
words. When she’s in a conversational mood they be¬ 
come fluid, to pose as punctuation marks. 

You probably got a pretty good idea of what she’s 
like when she hit you (and a couple of million others) 
right between the eyes with her first role in “You Came 
Along.” She’s following up that debut success with 
Hal Wallis’ “Strange Love.” 

She’s a positive person, this Lizabeth Scott. Not in 
the way of making positive statements—not that. With 
her it’s “I like you or I don’t.” Black and white stuff, 
with no shading; this way, when speaking of a friend 
on the Paramount lot: “I like him,” she says. “When 
he says something he makes it a complete sentence. 
It’s all there, between the capital and the period. No 
looking for hidden meanings. He has something to say, 
he says it. You know right away what he means. I 
like a person like that. Basic. And honest.” 

She was born in Scranton, Pennsylvania (Janet Blair 
hails from there, too) of English and Russian parents. 
She looks the first half, temperamentally she is the 
second. She completed a normal amount of schooling 
and then sat around the house mooning about the day 
she’d be able to pick up her portable typewriter and 
tour the world, writing endless newspaper columns in 
the manner of Dorothy Thompson. 

Mama Scott, weary of falling over the moon-eyed 
kid all day, finally revolted. “Look,” she said, “would 
you mind going out and finding some practical way of 
occupying your time?” 

Lizabeth took the hint. She heard that May Des¬ 
mond’s stock company was playing a season about 
twenty miles from Scranton, and went to investigate 
the machinations of the theatre. Theatrical glamor didn’t 
sway her, but she saw a chance of learning something 
that might pay off some day. Chucking her thoughts 
of becoming a camp counsellor or maybe even a play¬ 
ground instructor, she signed up for a season. By the 
end of the run greasepaint was coursing through her 
veins as though it had been there all her life. She 
waved a hurried goodbye to alma mater Marywood 
College, and trekked off to the big city to carve a 
career out of the granite heart of Manhattan. 

Mama, who thought a stage career so much poppy¬ 
cock, shed real tears the Sunday afternoon she left her 
leggy Lizabeth at the impressive portals of the Alvienne 
School of the Theatre in New York. 

But Lizabeth was happy. Until, in the course of her 
training, somebody tried to raise the pitch of her voice 
and she went around frightening little children with 
her unnatural soprano. 

“I sounded like an over-played record on the corner 
juke-box,” she says. 

When enough people had given her new voice alarmed 
double-takes, she gave up changing herself and her voice 
slid down a couple of octaves to normal. Lizabeth de¬ 
cided the stage would have to take her “as is,” or not 
at all. 

For a while it looked as if Broadway had accepted the 
latter challenge. She only saw the inside of a theatre 
when she had the money to plunk down on a 10th row 
balcony seat. 

Her family attempted to discourage her stage psychosis 
via the mails, and when that strategy failed, they cut 
down her allowance to twelve dollars a week. She 
merely cinched in her belt and (Continued on page 75) 


Recently inherited \/i interest In an English movie theatre. 


40 









• Food is a fixation with Anne Baxter. She likes 
nothing better than eating, unless maybe it’s 
John Hodiak calling her “Annie.” Jumps with 
jive at the K'ng Cole Trio, or plays a Sibelius 
record with the greatest of ease at the informal 
parties she gives. She speaks well and listens 
more often, which makes her a popular date 
with the boys out West. Chinese red is a favorite 
color—even borders her hankies with the stuff. 

i When Anne got back from location in Kanab, 

Utah, her “Smoky” dialogue overcame her 
friends—but the twang disappeared in a week! 







41 







Cesar shows his stitchesl He had to sew his own in his years of service in the Coast Guard. 


Home is sailor Cesar Romero; 
back from the Sooth Pacific, with 

credit and respect from ns all 



Fanned" during leave in Honolulu. 



The new coxswain passed out—cigars! 


42 















A familiar sight on the Twentieth 
Century-Fox lot these days is a tall, 
darkly handsome actor showing a 
group of Navy or Coast Guard young¬ 
sters around the studio. Many of the 
blue-uniformed kids call the actor 
“Pop,” at which he grins. 

Let any of the studio boys use that 
name, however, and they’d probably 
get a smart poke in the midriff—a 
poke they’d remember, too; because 
Cesar Romero, just out of his own 
Coast Guard uniform, is in top form, 
after two and a half years in service. 
(Twelve months of which were spent 
in the rugged battle area of the South 
•Pacific.) 

When Cesar went to boot camp, he 
started his nautical career with a 
bunch of 17-year-olds. He was older, 
but he didn’t, mind; he was just an 
apprentice seaman like the rest of 
’em. When he was discharged from 
service, a few months ago, he had 
advanced to the rank of chief boat¬ 
swain’s mate. But still the friendly, 
informal kind of guy who can meet 
a lot of kids—meet them, win their 
friendship, and talk their language. 

Still Cesar, like any Joe who has 
been in the fight, is ready to admit 
he’s glad to be back. “I wouldn’t have 
missed it,” he says, “but I wouldn’t 
want me, or anybody else, to have to 
go through it again. War is just what 
General Sherman said it was, and 
don’t let anybody kid you it isn’t!” 

Cesar concedes that the men who 
went through the war are bound to 
come home changed. “They can’t 
help it. They’ve seen magnificent 
bravery and soul-shattering destruc¬ 
tion. They’re more aware. They 
might have gone out youngsters, but 
they don’t come back youngsters.” 

He adds that he thinks he hasn’t 
changed much, himself—but he has. 
He looks the same. He didn’t gain or 
lose weight, and his clothes—those 
the moths (Continued on page 58) 


Among his souvenirs was Jap war bond wfcich didn't pay off. (Above, with Mama Romero.) 


43 






By FREDDA DUDLEY 


THE LASS WITH 

\ 



A grey-eyed sprite from Omaha, 
winsome Dorothy McGuire remains 

unchanged by time or fortune 


Hubby is $ocial John Swope. Above, George Brent. 


Stars in "Till The End Of Time" (RKO), with Guy Madison. 


She won't talk in "Spiral Staircase" until final scene. 










THE DELICATE AIR 

v. 


At the age of 13, Dorothy made stage debut in the Omaha Playhouse. Her leading man: Henry Fonda. 



Attempting to ensnare the essential quality of Dor¬ 
othy McGuire and fasten it to the printed page is like 
trying to catch a cupful of the fragrance of lilacs, like 
closing moonlight in your hands, like extending your 
tongue to taste the freshet of a symphony’s liquid burst. 

When Dorothy first came to Hollywood to make 
“Claudia,” dazed studio employees, entranced writers, 
and bemused fellow players shook their heads and said, 
“That freshness! That naivete! What a shame to have 
it spoiled by this town. In a year she’ll be so changed 


that her many New York friends won’t know her at all.” 

This is to reassure Dorothy’s New York friends as 
well as her local admirers and her multitudinous fans: 
Dorothy McGuire remains immutable, unaltered, and 
altogether fascinating. In private life, she still wears 
her hair like that of a medieval page; her eyes still wear 
the faintly bewildered but appealing expression prop¬ 
erly worn by a medieval page who had wandered into 
1945 without having been warned about stroboscopic 
cameras and atomic bombs. (Continued on page 85) 





Many a topnotch movie trouper 
soars to success in her teens. Right 
there and ready to put the accent on 
such youth are the Hollywood Hair¬ 
stylists. They’re the boys and girls 
who put “shampoo, shape and set” 
before “action, lights and camera.” 

When these early A.M. artists go 
to work they create a coiffure that 
helps to plot for personality. But 
from tot to teen-ager they demand 
the double role of suitability and 
simplicity. 

Here are representative hair-dos 
in good style for all these talented 
youngsters. With them, the setting 
instructions—for your talented fin¬ 
gers to mold similar styles. 


Design by Perc Westmore of Warner Bros. Model Joan Leslie plays 
in "Cinderella Jones." Hair is parted over left eye; alternating 
rows of clockwise and counter-clockwise pin curls shape left side; 
ends are rolled over fingers in soft curls. Right side of hair has 
two wide waves finished in hanging curls. Remainder of hair is 
brushed from the sides and back toward the crown, held with 
an elastic band, then wrapped with velvet ribbons and dec¬ 
orated with bows and costume-matching quilted strawberries. 


A simple styling by Carmen 
Dirigo for Universal's Ann 
Blyth. Half wave starts from 
left-side part and is finished with pin curls rolled 
in forward direction. One wave is held at right 
side with clips. Clockwise pin curls, rolled from 
ends up, complete sides and back. Hair is then 
dried and pushed into place. Ends are left loose. 


IN THE HEADLINES 


By SHIRLEY TOOK 

Itrauty Editor 


For curl control, M-G-M's Beverly Tyler lets her 
mass of ringlets grow below shoulder length to form 
a luxuriant and heavy cascade. Sides are pin- 
curled to deepen the waves, but the back hair 
is combed down severely and held in place with a 
ribbon while pin curls dry. Ends are brushed over 
fingers. Beverly's now in "The Green Years." 


46 













A Wally Westmore style for Diana Lynn, star of Para¬ 
mount's "Our Hearts Were Growing Up." Hair is parted 
on the left, arranged in flat waves parallel to the face 
above the ears and across the crown. From crown 
hair is drawn back smoothfy and from left to right 
with ends set into a single, plump ringlet curl. A 
shining wreath starts over right ear and twines curj. 


Nan Leslie, playing in RKO's "From This Day For¬ 
ward" wears a Hazel Rogers styling. Hair is sec¬ 
tioned off behind ears and over each eyebrow. Sec¬ 
tions are made into inch squares of clockwise pin 
curls in three rows. Sides are pin-curled toward face. 
Back is set over rollers to make the cluster curls. 


Beth Langston at 20th did this 
Peggy Ann Garner dressing for 
"Junior Miss." Hair Is parted 
in center, given a shadow wave 
at top and ends are loosely rolled into pin curls 
all around the head in four rows. The top row is 
rolled backward and the three lower ones are 
rolled forward. When they have dried, the 
hair is brushed vigorously for a natural effect. 


A sidesweep by Gale McGarry is worn by Selznick's Suzi 
Crandall who's in "Suddenly It's Spring." Entire head is 
pin-curled then brushed to one side, giving upward trend 
of hair from nap of neck to back of ear. Right side front 
is brushed back to meet hair that is swirled to the back of 
right ear and tied. Side ends are brushed out to fall loosely. 


47 













By DOROTHY DEERE 


scovered 


Guy 


was 


rad 


ud 


ence 


x V x 

\° .e- 


''V - 


Did Guy Madison ever dream about 
a movie career? He says he was 

never that crazy—even in his sleep 


He stood on the edge of the highway, blue middy taut 
across his astonishing shoulders, gob cap riding high 
on hair the color of a ripe wheat field, a white-toothed 
grin flashing blinker-light signals in the deep tan of 
his young face. 

He was, if he had known it, the walking definition'of 
what the Navy means when it sends out a call for 
“able-bodied” seamen. At that moment, however, he 
was not interested in walking. On his first liberty in 
weeks, he was more concerned with getting a hitch 
from San Diego to points more restful. 

A redhead with green eyes, plus other outstanding 
qualities, came to a sudden, skidding stop. (Any girl 
who wouldn’t have been slowed down would be suffer¬ 
ing from astigmatism, and shouldn’t be allowed behind 
a wheel, anyhow.) 

“Can you use a ride, mate?” 

The big, blonde kid looked at the car, every seat 
filled with what looked like a load of family out for 
an airing. (Continued on page 97) 























Perry Como and Vivian Blaine sing 5 hit songs in their picture, "Doll Face," (20th). 



Andv Russell and Director H. Schuster before "Breakfast In Hollywood." 


50 








By .TILL WARREN 


The Eastern bobby-sockers are sad kids these days, 
and all because both Frank Sinatra and Johnnie John¬ 
ston are in Hollywood. From the way their present 
schedules shape up, they’ll be out there for some time. 
Frank will report to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer soon to 
start rehearsals for “Jumbo” and Johnnie will be on 
the Culver City lot for “You Are Beautiful.” 

It shouldn’t be too long before Perry Como again 
heads for Movietown and Twentieth Century-Fox. The 
studio lost no time in picking up his option after the 
sensational job he did in “Doll Face.” His “Hubba, 
Hubba, Hubba” number with Martha Stewart is one of 
the highlights of the picture. 


Buddy Rich and his new band will be off on a theatre 
tour very soon. They played their first date at the 
Terrace Room in Newark, New Jersey, and from the 
way the crowd seemed to go for the band, Buddy should 
do all right. He has five trumpets, four trombones, five 
saxophones and rhythm section, and of course plays 
drums himself. The arrangements are definitely on the 
jump side. Dottie Reid, who formerly sang with Randy 
Brooks and Benny Goodman, is handling the vocal de¬ 
partment with Buddy also singing a tune now and then. 
In honor of Frank Sinatra, who put twenty-five thou¬ 
sand dollars into the band, the Rich uniforms will fea¬ 
ture the new droopy bow ties. (Continued on page 56) 



Not "King" Cole is a merry soul, particularly when he and his famous trio get going. The boys just ended a N.Y. engagement. 


51 









JUNIOR 

• His clothes are clues. 


TESS TRUEHEART 
• Heroine and often target. 


In many ways we United-Statesers are a di¬ 
vided people. We are democrats, republicans, 
socialists, communists, and unreconstructed reb¬ 
els. We argue (with only battle maces verboten) 
about baseball, football, basketball, bridge, re¬ 
ligion, and what became of Charlie Ross. The 
man who eats frog legs shudders at the thought 
of a human-being consuming an eel; and the man 
who went fishing and caught poison ivy rash, 
sneers at the local pingpong champion. 

But in one respect we are a solid front: we 
have a detective. Millions of us postpone that 
revitalizing first cup of morning coffee just long 
enough to discover what Flattop has done, or 
how Vitamin Flintheart’s romance is progressing, 


DICK TRACY 

• Stainless steel constitution 
and heart of well-beaten gold. 







By KATHERINE LAKE 


Shades of Itchy, Flat Top and Shaky! 
Dynamic Dick Tracy pursues the fabulous felon 

Splitface, in his first movie for RKO 

OF SEVENTY MILLIONS 



ITCHY 

• Makes way -for a new villain. 


BREATHLESS 

• No movie career ■for her. 


B. O. PLENTY 

• His weakness: dolls with dough. 


or how Breathless was dispatched to her ances¬ 
tors. Our life with our employer may be rough, 
our math exams may be rugged, our bobby sox 
may fail to match, or our upper plate may wobble; 
we may be assailed by a tough top sergeant’s 
temper, and Aunt Annie may leave her estate 
to a foundation for photographing emus; BUT of 
one thing we may be happily certain: Right will 
triumph through the auspices of non-smoking, 
non-drinking, intelligent, two-fisted, lantern- 
jawed DICK TRACY. 

RKO, having taken note of the American mass 
love affair with Mr. Tracy, got in touch with 
Tracy’s papa, Mr. Chester Gould of Chicago and 
bought the motion picture right to portray the 


dynamic detective on celluloid. Having secured 
the intrepid Dick, RKO needed someone to give 
him plenty of trouble. They discussed some of 
the comic strip’s current and projected miscreants 
with Chester Gould, and discovered a difficulty. 
It seems that Mr. Gould (Tracy has never liqui¬ 
dated an enemy) kills off a fabulous felon about 
every fourteen weeks. Had he also sold his forth¬ 
coming meanie, say the one who was already 
scheduled to follow Breathless and B.O. Plenty 
and Itchy, to RKO this condition would have re¬ 
sulted: by the tjme the picture was produced and 
distributed, that antagonism would have been 
as exciting to theatre-goers (who also read comic* 
strips) as the big snow (Continued on page 104) 


Cartoons by courtesy of 
Chicago Tribune News Syndicate 




















Presenting four faces—going places! They’re young, good-looking and talented 



1. Frances Ramsden starts movie career in Preston Sturges' "The Sin Of Harold Diddlebock." 

2. Michael Dunne was a top-spot newscaster and announcer for a New York radio station. 

3. Patricia Roc, lend-leased from Britain, will be seen in Universal's "Canyon Passage." {See page 29) 

4. Mark Stevens, a face on the cutting-room floor until RKO selected him for "From This Day Forward." 




Here is a quartet of new faces. One comes from a high place in British 
films, one from a top spot in radio, one suffered bitter experience before he 
began his rise, and one is taking her first step up the Hollywood ladder. 

Let me present Patricia Roc. She looks like a more animated Deanna 
Durbin, and she’s here on lend-lease from J. Arthur Rank of England to 
Walter Wanger at Universal Studios. 

As a child, Patricia wanted to be an artist. She had won school prizes 
and had taken honors in painting, so she was first choice when Bartram 
Gables Boarding School decided to have a mural painted over (Continued on page 71) 


By ALICE L. TILDESLEY 


54 


















WORDS OF MUSIC 

ICONTINUED FROM PAGE SI) 


WHAT'S BRISK ON THE DISC: 
Decca: 

Dick Haymes has recorded two 
more of the songs from his movie, 
“State Fair,” “It’s A Grand Night For 
Singing” and “All I Owe, Ioway.” 

Carmen Cavallaro has a worthy 
follow-up to his “Polonaise” with his 
piano solo of “Warsaw Concerto.” On 
the reverse side is “A Love Like 
This” with a Gloria Foster vocal. 

Connie Boswell and Russ Morgan 
join forces for “Walkin’ With My 
Honey” and “Let It Snow, Let It 
Snow, Let It Snow.” 

From his “Road To Utopia” picture, 
Bing Crosby has waxed “It’s Any¬ 
body’s Spring” and “Welcome To My 
Dreams.” 

Those zanies, the Hoosier Hotshots, 
have two new novelties in “Sioux City 
Sue,” with Two Ton Baker on the 
lyrics, and “There’s A Tear In My 
Beer Tonight,” sung by Sally Foster. 

Here’s an unusual combination— 
the Andrews Sisters and Guy Lom¬ 
bardo’s orchestra. They do “Money Is 
The Root Of All Evil” (Take It Away, 
Take It Away, Take It Away) and 
“Johnny Fedora.” The latter tune is 
the one the girls sing in the Walt 
Disney production, “Make Mine 
Music.” It’s a song about two hats in 
a showcase who fall in love, Johnny 
Fedora and Alice Bluebonnet. 

Columbia: 

Count Basie’s new one is “Jivin’ Joe 
Jackson,” sung by Ann Moore, the 
Count’s new vocalist. On the reverse 
side is a jump thing entitled “Queer 
Street.” 

Gene Krupa and the boys do “Are 
These Really Mine?” with Buddy 
Stewart asking the musical question; 
and the Western novelty, “Harriet,” 
with Buddy and Anita O’Day making 
with the lyrics. 

By the way, the Columbia Company 
is now on the air every week with a 
transcribed program called “The 
Columbia Record Shop.” The show 
will feature advance previews of new 


platters by all the Columbia artist's— 
Sinatra, Harry James, Woody Her¬ 
man, Gene Autry, Benny Goodman, 
etc. Martin Block is the m.c. and 
commentator. 

Victor: 

Charlie Spivak’s latest combines 
“The Bells Of St. Mary’s” and “You 
Can Cry On Somebody’s Shoulders,” 
with a Jimmy Saunders vocal. 

That popular group, The Sons Of 
The Pioneers, have recorded ‘Tor- 
give and Forget” and “The Timber 
Trail.” 

Spike Jones and the City Slickers 
give their special treatment to “The 
Blue Danube” and “You Always Hurt 
The One You Love.” 

Tommy Dorsey’s aggregation is in 
with “The Moment I Met You,” lyric- 
ized by The Sentimentalists, and “That 
Went Out With Button Shoes,” with 
The Sentimentalists, Pat Brewster and 
Stuart Foster all helping out with 
the vocal. 

For his second appearance on the 
Victor label, David Street does “I’m 
Not Having Any” (This Year) and a 
new novelty, “Uh-Huh.” 

Jam Notes: 

Bob Eberly is out of the army and 
has resumed his' singing career as a 
single . . . Buddy Clark is in civilian 
clothes once more . . . Betty Hutton 
and Capitol records have parted com¬ 
pany. She wants to sing more ballads 
and less novelties, and inasmuch as 
the Capitol roster is fairly loaded with 
femme ballad singers (Jo Stafford, 
Martha Tilton, Margaret Whiting, etc.) 
an amicable settlement of her con¬ 
tract was arranged. She will un¬ 
doubtedly sign with another company 
soon . . . Incidentally, the boss man 
of Capitol, Johnny Mercer, may be 
back on the air in the near future, 
for which hooray . . . Benny Goodman 
recently gifted his old alma mater, the 
world famous Hull House in Chicago, 
with five thousand dollars for the 
purpose of reorganizing the Hull 




Familiar to fans of the Henry Aldrich series, 
comedian Charlie Smith appears with June 
Haver in 20th’s "Three Little Girls in Blue." 

House Boys’ Band. It was in that 
band, in the early twenties, that 
Benny received his first musical edu¬ 
cation . . . Tony Pastor’s vocal team 
of Ruth McCullough and Dick Dyer 
will be broken up because Ruth (Mrs. 
Dyer) is expecting a baby . . . Hazel 
Scott, (Mrs. Adam Powell) is also 
expecting a visit from the stork; and 
David Street and his bride, Lois An¬ 
drews, will welcome the long legged 
bird sometime this surrfmer . . . 
Artie Shaw must be serious this time 
about breaking up his band—he and 
the Victor Company no longer have 
a recording contract . . . Charlie 
Spivak has a new vocal group which 
he calls “The Stardreamers.” They 
are four sisters whom he heard when 
he played a date in Louisville, Ken¬ 
tucky . . . Charlie’s crooner, Jimmy 
Saunders, recently married the beau¬ 
tiful New York model, Rita Daigle. 
She is the “Miss Rheingold” for 
1946 . . . Butch Stone, Les Brown’s 
novelty singer, has decided to delay 
forming his own band for another 
year. He recently signed a new con¬ 
tract with Les for that length of time 
. . . Dick Culver is no longer the 
croon man with Jimmy Dorsey . . . 
Sally Stuart, who used to sing with 
Sammy Kaye, is now doing lyric duty 
with the Vaughn Monroe orchestra . . . 
Jack Smith has received several offers 
to go to Hollywood . . . And Billy 
Williams, Sammy Kaye’s singer, is 
being paged by Columbia Pictures to 
star in a series of musical westerns ... 
Louis Prima and his wife, Alma Ross, 
are divorcing . . . Harry Babbitt, Kay 
Kyser’s former singing star, may be 
out of the Navy soon. He won’t return 
to the Kyser band, but will try his 
luck as a single. 


That ties it for now, but I’ll 
be back next month. In the 
meantime, if you have any musi¬ 
cal questions, drop me a line and 
I’ll do my best to answer you. 
Just be sure to enclose a SELF- 
ADDRESSED STAMPED EN¬ 
VELOPE. Write to Jill Warren 
— Movieland Magazine — 
535 Fifth. Avenue, New York 
City 17, New York. 














m 


Stan Kenton 










This vivacious Johnny Mercer "find" is another 
Capitol-exclusive artist! Her individually- 
styled Capitol record, 'It Might As Well Be 
Spring', has clicked in a big way! More of 
Margaret's sure-shot top-tunes are on their 
woy. Watch for them ! 


SnaesSoo 


YEPPPP...HE DID IT! Stan proved 
that swing has a definite place in 
the modern musical world. His 

effective, fast-moving arrangements 
are new...they're different...they're 
distinctive. Don't miss Stan's current 
Capitol release,'ArtistryJumps'... 

It's great! In fact, it's Ter-r-r-r-rific! 


records 


"vT Apdy Russell 


Sensational is the word! He skyrocketed with 
Besame Mucho'ond 'Amor'; his Capitol album, 
Favoritos', is a best-seller; currently he is 
making his film bow in "Stork Club". Andy 
is an exclusive Capitol artist, too. 




These slick chicks won wide fame on radio's 
"National Barn Dance"! ... are now picture¬ 
making in Hollywood. Their popular Capitol 
album, 'Songs by the Dinning Sisters', sets a 
new high in triple-tone close harmony. 


SUNSET AND VINE 


57 









































58 





« 


☆ 

HARD 
TO GET 
RECORDS 


A SELECTION 
OF YOUR FAVORITES — 
OLD AND NEW 

□ I Used To Love You (But It’s All Over); 
A Pretty Girl Is Like a Melody—Phil Brito 
—53c 

□ Tab Steps Out; The Things You Are—Tab 
Smith—$1.05 

□ Song To Remember Album—Jose Iturbi— 
$1.84 

□ San Antonio Rose; Cool Water—Red River 
Dave—79e 

□ Hot Piano Album—Johnny Guarineri Trio— 
$3.78 

□ Autumn Serenade; It’s Been a Long Long 

Time—Harry James—53e ^ 

□ Crying Sands; Northwest Passage—Chubby 
Jackson Sextet—79c 

□ Flamethrower; Night and Day—Coleman 
Hawkins—79c 

□ Beer Barrel Polka; The Original—Glahe 
Mussett—79c 

□ Rhumba Rhapsody; Estudiantina Samba— 
Lagardo Quintet—79c 

□ Aren’t You Glad You’re You; A Door Will 
Open—Tommy Dorsey—53c 

□ Chopin’s Polonaise—Jose Iturbi—12"—$1.05 

□ Bad Table Boogie; Merry Go Round—Jay 
McShann—$1.05 

□ I Can’t Get Enough Of You; Too Blue To 
Cry—Savannah Churchill—79c 

□ Come To Baby Do; Just A Sittin’ and A 
Rockin’—Georgie Auld—53c 

□ Air Mail Special; Here Comes Heaven— 
Georgie Auld—53c 

□ The Nutcracker Suite Album by Spike Jones 
$2.63. 

□ Chopin’s Polonaise Album—Al Goodman— 
$2.63 

□ Bunny Barrigans Memorial Album—$2.63 

□ Dig You Later (Hubba-Hubba-Hubba); 
Here Comes Heaven Again—Perry Como— 
53c 

D : She’s No Trouble—Benny Moter— 

O Moonglow; Moon of Monakoora—Vaughn 
Monroe—53e 

□ Blue Moon; Shine On Harvest Moon— 
Vaughn Monroe—53e 

D Sammy Kayes Album of Famous Foster Re¬ 
cordings—$3.15 

□ Dinah; Moonglow—Benny Goodman Quartet 
—53c 

□ Symphony: In The Middle Of May—Freddy 
Martin—53c 

□ Wa^rjaw Concerto of Boston “Pops” 12” 

□ Haunted Town; Good For Nothing Joe— 
C. Barnett—37e 

□ Rhapsedy In Blue Album—Boston “Pops”— 
$2.36 

□ Boogie Woogie; There You Go—Tommy Dor¬ 
sey—53c 

n My Mother’s Waltz; Remember When— 
Wayne King—53e 

□ I Surrender Dear; Malibu—Benny Carter— 

53c 

□ Fats Waller Album “At The Ivories”—$2.63 

□ Road To Morocco; Put It There Pal—Bing 
Crosby with Bob Hope—$1.05 

D Lost In The Stars; September Song—Walter 
Huston—$1.05 

□ Ave Maria; Anfenhalt—Marian Anderson 
12"—$1.05 

O Jingle Bells Swing; Santa Claus Is Coming 
To Town Song—Benny Goodman, with 
Tommy Dorsey—53c 

□ Dancing Shoes Polka; Jolly Inn Polka— 
The Bohemians—79e 

□ Lover Man; Shaw’ Nuff— Dizzy Gillespie— 
$1.05 

□ Chickery Chick; I Lost My Job Again— 
Sammy Kaye—53c 


Check the Records You Want — 

Olden mailf 

We ship records around fhe corner or around the 
world. Three or more records shipped C.O.D., 
express insured. All orders shipped same day 
as received. NO PACKING CHARGES. All orders 
outside of U.S.A. must be accompanied by cash. 



77 Clinton Ave., S., Rochester 4, N. Y. 

One of the largest Popular, Hot Jazz, Boogie 
Woogie and Classical Record Stocks in the 
entire U. S. A. 


HAIL CESAR! 

fCONTINUED FROM PAGE 431 


didn’t discover while he was away— 
still fit. His laugh is just as hearty. 
But he’s more serious. The Romero 
for whom the rhumba was a top inter¬ 
est, before the war, now talks about 
rehabilitation, racial problems and re¬ 
spect for his fellow man. 

“When I came back from the battle 
zone a year ago for shore duty, my 
friends said I was a ‘sour puss.’ I 
was,” Romero admits now. “I’m more 
relaxed since, but there are still plenty 
of things to think about. 

“While you’re fighting, you love 
anyone who’s on your side; love him 
like a brother. It’s a shock then to 
come home and find racial prejudice 
and religious intolerance. All the guys 
who have been fighting were fighting 
for what they call ‘the good things’, 
the normal way of life. But coming 
back to civilian life, that ‘normal way’ 
somehow hits them in the face. The 
change back is so abrupt. Discourtesy 
and indifference from waiters, parking 
lot attendants, and shopkeepers are 
•silly things to get upset about, but 
to me they were startling!” 

Don’t get the idea that the dashing 
Cesar is pessimistic about the United 
States or the future. He’s very opti¬ 
mistic. “Affairs have been so tangled 
for six years that you can’t expect to 
solve everything overnight,” he points 
out sagely. 

He can’t tell you enough about the 
courage of boys who fought and won 
the war. He talks little about his own 
part. 

After boot camp, Romero went to 
gunnery schools in Virginia and Rhode 
Island, then spent two months at the 
receiving station on Ellis Island while 
his ship, the U. S. S. Cavalier, (an at¬ 
tack transport) was commissioned, 
had her trial runs and final fitting. 
Cesar was a first class seaman in the 
deck crew, when they sailed for the 
Pacific. 

Incidentally, the Cavalier —officially 
the APA 37—was manned by the 
Coast Guard. “The Coast Guard didn’t 
stick around our own coast this time. 
We manned everything in the Navy 
except battleships and aircraft car¬ 
riers,” says Romero, with pride in his 
branch. (As a kid he had some sum¬ 
mer Army military training at Platts- 
burg, N. Y. But came the war and he 
enlisted in the branch of his choice— 
the Coast Guard.) 

An attack transport, in case you 
don’t know, is a big ship; the size of 
a Victory ship, but faster. It carries 
the landing barges, the troops and 
supplies and equipment, right into the 
beach heads. The APA 37 was part of 
Task Force 58. Remember what that 
outfit did in the Marianas? 

“Most of the men and boys in our 
crew—about 500—had never seen 
action before we sailed off Saipan,” 
Romero recalls. “Our attack on that 
island was no surprise to the Japs. 

In fact Tokyo Rose, in a broadcast a 
few nights before, had said they were 
waiting for us—and they were. 

“The Marines who went in on the 
first assault took the full brunt of it 
and were practically wiped opt. We 
arrived on D-Day plus 1, the day after 
the invasion started. From a distance 
we could see the devastation that was 
taking place on shore. Fire and smoke 
poured from all parts of the island 
and the bombardment was terrifif. 


“Aboard my ship we carried Army 
troops — reserves, supposed to go 
ashore only in case of an emergency. 
We’d been there only an hour, when 
we received the order to unload our 
troops and take them ashore imme¬ 
diately—which gave us a pretty good 
idea of the seriousness of the situation. 
The Marines on shore needed help, 
and fast. 

“We lowered our boats and filled 
them up with our boys and got them 
ashore safely. Then we came back to 
our ship to unload our supplies: tanks, 
jeeps, ammunition, food, water, medi¬ 
cal supplies, everything right on down 
to candy. But before we had a chance 
to open our hatches, we had to secure 
and haul out to sea as fast as we 
could go, because 100 Jap planes came 
in on us. Every large ship in the har¬ 
bor went with us. Our fighters went 
up to meet the enemy and only six of 
the Jap planes got through. Our anti¬ 
aircraft barrage was so heavy the 
Japs had to drop their bombs from 
great altitudes and they missed prac¬ 
tically everything. 

“We stayed out at sea for seven days 
then, and I think that was the toughest 
week during the operation,’ which for 
us consisted of 71 days at sea. They 
were tough because we knew how 
desperately the men on shore needed 
the supplies we had on board and we 
could not get in to unload. We finally 
made it, and our ship made a good 
record for itself. We never lost one 
barge, never lost one load of equip¬ 
ment, and most important—we never 
lost one member of our crew!” 

There is real pride in Romero’s eyes 
as he talks about his ship and his 
crew-mates. He, incidentally, was 
first powderman on the forward five- 
inch gun at battlestation. That’s no 
soft job. 

There is a new note in his voice 
when he starts talking about evacuat¬ 
ing the wounded from Saipan to Eni- 
wetok, of later picking up the battle- 
weary Marines who had been fighting 
for 25 days and nights on Saipan and 
taking them straight to Tinian to be 
sent in on the first assault wave there. 
You know why he’s changed. He has 
deep respect and humble admiration 
for those fighters. 

He remembers writing letters for 
G.I.’s. and Marines in the ship’s hos¬ 
pital; for boys who never made the 
voyage home. He recalls their cour¬ 
age, their quiet endurance of pain. 
He remembers the burials at sea. 

When he came back to the main¬ 
land he flew in fifteen hours from the 
world of war to civilian peace. “It was 
that quick transition that accented the 
difference, I think.” 

He was then assigned to make 
speeches in war plants all over the 
country, to encourage civilians to 
greater production and to buy more 
bonds. “That was easy for me. All I 
had to do was tell them what I had 
seen, to talk to them as S member of 
the Coast Guard.” 

Cesar recalls, of course, less serious 
moments during his service. For ex¬ 
ample, it was his job to stage shows 
aboard ship. 

“What talent there was in that 
bunch of boys!” he says. “There were 
singers, dancers, musicians, actors. 
We’d write shows. Sometimes I 
danced. They didn’t think of me as 



































an actor. I was just another guy in 
the crew. They didn’t even ask me to 
get pin-up pictures for them, but the 
kids who did collect pin-ups of movie 
stars sometimes did ask me if I knew 
Betty Grable or Lana Turner or Linda 
Darnell, and what were they like? 

“We had movies. Sometimes new 
ones, but usually not so new. One of 
my old Cisco Kid pictures and ‘Week 
End in Havana’ that I did a few years 
before, were shown on board—and 
then did I take a ribbing!” 

Cesar admits he never learned any¬ 
thing in his movie career that was any 
help in the Coast Guard. Asked the 
usual question of what he wanted to 
come home to, he says, “Nothing spe¬ 
cial. I just wanted to get home.” But 
it’s the little familiar things that are 
most gratifying to him now; a com¬ 
fortable chair, eating leisurely, seeing 
his family who are visiting him at his 
Brentwood home. 

Cesar has never been much of a 
gardener; he doesn’t belong to the San 
Fernando Valley ranch set, because 
when he plants something he impa¬ 
tiently wants to see immediate results. 
Yet after his release from service he 
worked for days on end in his yard, 
trimming trees, pruning bushes. It 
was just a “little thing” that made 
him feel more at home. 

“Squeak,” his Boston bull, was glad 
to see him come home. But according 
to Cesar, “That dog is glad to see any¬ 
one!” 

Sure, he’s glad to be back, glad to 
see his old Hollywood friends—but he 
misses the guys. As for movies—well, 
that’s what he always wanted. He 
didn’t want to change jobs, and he has 
his contract at Twentieth. His first 
picture, and he’s pleased about it, is 
the big Technicolor production “Three 
Little Girls in Blue,” with John Payne, 
June Haver, and Vivian Blaine. 

Cesar is interested in the new faces 
around the lot, the kids who have won 
fame since he left, the new stars. But 
he’s also interested in movies in an¬ 
other field. 

“The most important thing in the 
world now is to establish a lasting 
peace, understanding, respect for our 
fellow men—and the motion pictures 
can be the greatest medium in spread¬ 
ing our ideology. Movies can put over 
any message we choose. They’ve sold 
everything in foreign countries, from 
jitterbug dancing to sewing machines. 
Now I hope we’ll sell the thing that is 
really important: human understand¬ 
ing. 

“I’m being terribly serious,” Cesar 
laughed as ne lit a cigarette. In his 
well tailored gray suit, his smile flash¬ 
ing, he quickly seemed to transform 
into the charming actor. But on his 
lapel were his service button and 
miniature service ribbons. In his eyes 
was something that made you know 
he wouldn’t ever forget the kids at 
Saipan and Tinian and what they 
fought for. As he himself had pointed 
out, he’s learned a great respect for 
his fellow man. 

Hail, Cesar! 

The End 


BONNY BRAY: 

Ar» acquaintance congratulated Allan 
Jones upon his modesty. 'You're one 
of the few persons who has never let 
success go to his head," said the friend. 

Grinned Allan, "Since I first entered 
pictures, my singing stock-in-trade has 
been 'The Donkey Serenade.' I've tried 
not to let it go to my ears.” 




SEND NO MONEY... WE MAIL C. 0. 


BETTY CO-ED OF HOLLYWOOD, DEPT. 408 
6253 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 

Pteare s«nd ‘'fashion Parana” Suit at S10-M plut postage. 

Slits 10 12 14 16 II 20 (Circle tin wanted) 
MtuQ Black □ Bel □ PswdtrQ (Mork 1st & 2nd Color Choice) 
Please send ”Hffh Hat” at S2.M phis postage. Black B Aqua 1 1 
Brtura A Btifi □ Grey t Rat □ (Mark 2 Color Choices) 

Send “Glamour Ba|" at S5.SI Black □ Brown □ 

NAME--.-. 

ADDRESS.. 

CtTY___ 


.TONE.STATE.. 


r<v* s * 


v\\*° 


•tv**** 


vivtVv ** 


ov)“ 


ADEIE MARA 

featured in 
Republic’s 
"Night Train 
to AAemphis' 


Berry co-ed or Hollywood 

Dept. MB, 62S3 Hollywood Boulevard, Holtywocd 28, Calif. 


98 

plus postage 


plus postoge 


PARADE* Suit— Smooth, 
silky, year-around rayon fabric ... 
beautifully tailored with patch pock¬ 
ets, fitted, belted waist and kick-pleat 
in skirt. Slim lines! Sizes lO to 20. 


Aqua • Black • Red • Powder 


"HIGH HAT*— Flatter¬ 
ing two-tone turban ef¬ 
fect in rich 100% wool 
jersey. Fits all head- 
sizes! 

Black 8< Aqua 
Brown & Beige 
Gray & Red 


BAG*- 
leather 

in unusual triangle 
shape!...Wide band 
slips over wrist. Expensive- 
looking plastic trim! 

Black or Brown 


plus postage 


(including tax) 





























This active, busy shopper 
Is modern as can be. 
Relying on Meds’ comfort, 
Meds’ real security! 


So convenient, too! Meds internal 
protection means quick changing, 
easy disposal and complete freedom 
from all odor and chafing. A gen¬ 
erous supply of Meds. can be slipped 
into your handbag—and no one the 
wiser! "Next time,” do try Meds! 

• Meds alone have the "SAFETY- 
WELL”—designed for your extra 
protection. 

• Meds are made of real COTTON— 
soft and super-absorbent for extra 
comfort. 

• Meds expand quickly and adapt them¬ 
selves easily to individual needs. 

Meds-tiffin 

FOR 10 IN APPLICATORS 



Note special design of Meds applicators. Firm, 
smooth, easy to use, completely disposable. 


OH YOU NASTY DAN! 


(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 271 


smiling broadly, was the real life 
counterpart of the man she had just 
vilified—Dan Duryea! 

Dan’s wife, Helen, had been kidding 
of course; hearing him blasphemed 
by complete strangers is an old story 
to her, and actually she takes it as 
a great compliment to his acting 
ability. Usually she ignores the “in¬ 
sults” but the set-up this time had 
been so perfect, she could not resist 
the chance for a little impish fun. 

It is just as well that both Dan and 
Helen have a well-developed sense 
of humor, for there is no doubt he 
is the world’s prize louse on the 
screen. Barring none, he is the nasti¬ 
est, sneakiest, rottenest (and rapidly 
becoming the most successful!) vil¬ 
lain doing celluloid dirty work today. 
Audiences just naturally loathe him 
with an intensity manifested toward 
no other cinematic doer of evil, and 
inwardly fret and fume because plot 
writers never give him as horrendous 
an end as he deserves. 

Paradoxically, Dan also can give 
out with great gobs of charm on 
the screen, which may be one answer 
to the potency of the illusion of evil 
he creates. You may loathe him 
mightily one moment, but in the next 
instant, provided the situation permits 
at, you find yourself secretly experi¬ 
encing quite a little yen for the guy. 
Especially is this true of women, 
which augurs that one of these days 
producers are going to capitalize on 
it as they did in making a romantic 
blackguard out of Bogart. First step 
along this line already has been taken 
in a tentative fashion by Universal 
in Dan’s new picture, “Scarlet Street” 
with Joan Bennett and Edward G. 
Robinson; rat though he is in the 
picture, he likewise has sufficient per¬ 
sonal charm and sex appeal to justify 
Joan’s loving him madly. And how, 
sisters, and how! 

Offscreen, of course, Dan is the 
usual contradiction to the roles he 
plays. He lives quietly with his wife 
and two sons, enthusiastically pur¬ 
sues his hobby of gardening, and 
minds his own business. In fact, he is 
such a helluva nice guy, it is difficult 
to reconcile his good looks, good 
manners, winning smile, and gracious 
charm with the various forms of 
pediculi he brings to vivid life as an 
actor. 

This latter contention, incidentally, 
Dan vigorously denies. Being nasty 
on the screen comes so easy, he says, 
it scares him it may be natural! As 
proof he points to a home movie he 
made recently with some friends on 
a camping trip. 

“We shot a lot of informal stuff, all 
of us doing simple little things around 
the camp or clowning together the 
way you do in those movies,” he re¬ 
lated. “I thought I was being my 
most charming and natural self, but 
when we ran the films some weeks 
later, it was an outright shock to look 
at myself and see exactly the kind of 
guy I thoroughly dislike!. And may I 
add, it has given me pause for more 
than a little introspective thought?” 

Dan, who makes no bones about 
his age of a comfortable 38, did not 
set out in life to become the screen’s 
most poisonous character. Nor, for 
that matter," did he dream of becom¬ 


ing a professional actor at all. A 
career in business was his goal, and 
he had scored a notable success in 
that field while he still was in his 
twenties. That very success, in fact, 
led him in a roundabout way to 
Hollywood. 

Born in White Plains, N. Y., where 
his parents still live, Dan attended 
the White Plains High School, and it 
was here he first developed a mild 
interest in the theatre by playing the 
romantic lead in several high school 
plays. Later at Cornell University, 
where he worked his way through 
3 of his 4 years of college by waiting 
on table in a dormitory, his interest 
in things theatrical sharpened some¬ 
what, and he was starred in 'several 
college productions. In 1928, his 
senior year, he succeeded Franchot 
Tone as president of the Cornell Dra¬ 
matic Club. 

Upon graduation he plunged into 
the business world, becoming a seller 
of advertising space for the Katz 
Agency for which he still harbors a 
great affection. By the end of 6 years, 
he had worked up to the responsible 
position of head of the agency’s Phila¬ 
delphia branch, but he also had 
worked himself into a near nervous 
breakdown. 

Casting about for a substitute occu¬ 
pation on doctor’s orders, he decided 
the theatre offered an interesting and 
less strenuous life. He also observed 
that his ex-Cornell classmate, Sidney 
Kingsley, the playwright, was casting 
his new play, “Dead End,” after hav¬ 
ing scored heavily with his first play, 
“Men In White.” Whereupon he 
called on Kingsley, put the bee on 
him for a job, and came up with a 
small role of one of the G-men in 
the play. 

“At least I started as a righteous 
and noble character,” Dan avers. “It 
was ‘Missouri Legend’ which got me 
off the track.” 

His Broadway debut long will re¬ 
main a vivid memory to Dan. By one 
of those flukes which sometimes 



Dan is again a scoundrel in "Scarlet Street." 

















Take Your Pick of 400 Little Blue Books at Bargain Price of 5/ Each 

240.000,000 SOLD IX 26 YEARS 


Add le per book for packing, 
handling and earriaQ*. Order by 
number. Order at least 20 books 
—as many more as you like. Can¬ 
ada and foreign, 7c per book, pre¬ 
paid. If you order every book in 
this ad — 400 books — remit only 
$19.75 and we will prepay all 
carriage charges. 

Self-Help Books 

25 Rhyming Dictionary 
75 On the Choice of Books 
78 Hints on Public Speak¬ 
ing 

82 Common Faults in 
Writing English 
86 On Reading. Brandes 
93 How to Live 100 Years 
112 Secret of Self-Develop¬ 
ment 

192 A Book of Synonyms 
326 Hints on Writing Short 
Stories 

514 Hints on Writing Po¬ 
etry. 

556 Hints on Etiquette 
629 Hand-book of Legal 
.Forms 

639 4,000 Most Essential 
English words 

681 Spelling Self Taught 

682 Grammar Self Taught 

683 Punctuation Self 

Taught 

703 Physiology Self 
Taught 

725 Zoology Self Taught 
734 Useful Phrases 
748 Plane Geometry Self 
Taught 

751 How to Merchandise 
801 A Rapid Calculator 
815 Familiar Quotations 

821 How to Improve Your 

Vocabulary 

822 Rhetoric Self Taught 

823 English Composition 

Self Taught 
835 Useful Tables 
847 Card Games 

855 How to Write Letters 

856 Arithmetic Self 

Taught Part I 

857 Arithmetic Self 

Taught Part II 
868 Hints on Self-Improve¬ 
ment 

872 Manual of Parliamen¬ 
tary Law 

891 Your Talent and How 
to Develop It 

894 How to Advertise 

895 Astronomy for Begin¬ 

ners 

994 Physics Self Taught 
1004 How to Save Money 
1031 How to Own Your 
Home 

1174 How to Write Business 
Letters 

1206 How to Swim 
1319 How to Study 
1351 How to Get Ahead 
1357 What You Should 
Know About Law 
1427 Law for Workingman 

1503 Effective English in 

Speech and Writing 

1504 How to Overcome Self- 

Consciousness 
1555 Rules for Success in 
Business 

1726 How to Think 
Creatively 

Biography 

33 Brann: Smasher of 
Shams 

123 Life of Madame du 
Barry 

141 Life of Napoleon 

142 Life of Bismarck 

253 Heart Affairs of Henry 
VIII 

324 Life of Lincoln 
343 Diary of Columbus in 
1492 

395 Autobiography of 
Cellini 

412 Life of Mohamet 
490 Life of Michelangelo 
506 Life of Voltaire 

522 Life of Thomas Paine 

523 Life of Franklin 

525 Life of Goethe 

526 Life of Caesar 

528 Life of Shhkespeare 
537 Life of Barnum 
565 Magellan and the 
Pacific 

604 Life of Roosevelt 
718 Great Women of 
Antiquity 

769 Life of Thomas Jeffer¬ 
son 

1482 Career of Gen. U. S. 
Grant 

1723 Career of A1 Capone 

Entertainment 

606 How to Play Chess 
626 Old Favorite Negro 
Songs 

658 Toasts for all Occa¬ 
sions 


704 Facts to Know About 
Palmistry 

767 Facts to Know About 
Astrology 

845 Facts to Know About 
Fortune-Telling 
893 Five Hundred Riddles 
995 How to Play the Piano 
1006 Children’s Games 
1010 Book of Amateur 
Magic Tricks 

1049 How to Teach Y ourself 
to Sing 

1103 Book of Puzzles and 
Brainteasers 
1139 Photography Self 
Taught 

1175 Amusing Riddles 
1183 How to Play Checkers 
1210 Mathematical Oddities 
1239 Party Games for 
Grown Ups 

1254 Contract Bridge Made 
Easy 

1277 Hindu Magic Self 

Taught 

1278 Ventriloquism Self 

Taught 

1285 Gamblers' Crooked 
Tricks Exposed 
1688 100 Cocktails 
1747 Games of Solitaire 

Famous Books 

1 Rubaiyat of Omar 
Khayyam 

220 Vest’s Tribute to a 
Dog 

313 Decay of Lying. Oscar 
Wilde 

337 Pippa Passes. Robert 
Browning 

349 Apology for Idlers 
394 Boswell’s Life of Dr. 

Samuel Johnson 
406 Essay on Man. Alex¬ 
ander Pope 

785 Ballads of Sir Walter 
Scott 

1196 Girl with Three Hus¬ 
bands 

1532 Don Quixote. Cervantes 

Fiction 

12 Mystery Tales. Poe 
21 Carmen 
23 Great Sea Stories 
40 House and Brain 
58 Tales from Decameron. 

T) n A/*Q a 

102 Sherlock Holmes Tales 
107 The Dream Woman 
145 Great Ghost Stories 
215 Miraculous Revenge. 

Bernard Shaw 
223 Wanton Wife of a 

King. Jack London 
277 Man Without a 
Country 

290 The Gold Bug 
352 Short Stories. William 
Morris 

375 Love Story of an Old 
Maid 

630 Second-Story Man. 
Upton Sinclair 

672 Illicit Love. Boccaccio 

673 Tales of Love and Life. 

Boccaccio 

698 Tales of Chicago. Ben 

Hecht 

699 Broken Necks. Ben 

Hecht 

746 A Daughter of Eve 
1166 Infatuation 

1457 Sketches of Naughty 

Ladies. Goethe 

1458 The Princess and the 

Tiger. Goethe 

1605 The Girl in the Snappy 
Roadster 

1610 One Lover Among 
Many 

1624 The Woman Who In¬ 
spired Fatal Passion. 
Anatole France 
1669 The Jolly Beggars. 
Robt. Burns 

Fine Arts 

387 History of Painting 
403 History of Music 
466 History of Sculpture 
468 History of Architec¬ 
ture 

French Literature 
in English 

3 Fourteen Little Essays. 
Voltaire 

6 Love. Maupassant 

27 Last Days of Con¬ 

demned Man. Hugo 

28 Toleration. Voltaire 
52 Oration on Voltaire. 

Hugo 

66 Crimes of Borgias. 
Dumas 


85 Attack on the Mill. 
Zola 

87 Love: An Essay. 
Montaigne 

103 Pocket Theology. 

Voltaire 

104 Battle of Waterloo. 

Hugo 

178 One of Cleopatra’s 
Nights 

198 Majesty of Justice. 

France 

199 The Tallow Ball. 

Maupassant 

200 Ignorant Philosopher 

Voltaire 

221 On Women. Maeter¬ 
linck 

292 Mademoiselle Fifl. 
Maupassant 

314 Short Stories. Daudet 
344 Don Juan. Balzac 

886 The Piece of String. 

Maupassant 

887 The Necklace. De Mau¬ 

passant 

888 Memoirs of Madame 

de Stael 

Health 

1242 Care of Skin and Hair 
1321 Fasting for Health 
1426 Foot Troubles 
Corrected 

1435 Constipation: Its Cor¬ 
rection 

1443 Daily Exercises for 
Busy People 

1478 Poor Posture Corrected 

by Exercise 

1479 Correction of Under¬ 

weight and Over¬ 
weight 

1534 How to Test Urine at 
Home 

1553 Exercises for Nervous¬ 
ness and Indigestion 
1563 Marvels of Sunlight 

History 

50 Paine’s Common Sense 
83 Marriage: Its Past 

Present and Future. 
Annie Besant 
126 History of Rome 

149 Historic Crimes and 

Criminals 

150 Lost Civilizations 
214 Speeches of Lincoln 
276 Speeches of Washing¬ 
ton 

558 Great Pirates. C. J. 
Finger 

596 A History of Modern 

Mexico 

597 History of American 

Revolution 

627 History of the Jews 
1065 Lives of U. S. Presi¬ 
dents 

1241 Outline of U. S. 
History 

1757 Facts V\.bout Alaska 

Humor 

20 Let’s Laugh. Nasby 
26 On Going to Church. 
Bernard Shaw 
168 Witty Epigrams. 

Oscar Wilde 
291 The Jumping Frog. 
Twain 

347 Riddle Rimes 

348 Best Wit of the Scotch 
382 Humor of Lincoln 
670 Josh Billings’ Comical 

Lexicon 

771 Humor of '’Bill” Nye 

971 Humorous Anecdotes 
1115 Ridiculous Stories 
1146 College Humor 

1191 Broadway Wisecracks 

1199 Laughable Lyrics 

1200 Nonsense Stories 
1261 Prize Winning Tongue 

Twisters 

Jokes 

972 Popular Joke Book 

1012 Best Negro Jokes 

1013 Best Irish Jokes 

1014 Best American Jokes 

1184 Book of Best Scotch Jokes 
1228 Best Jokes About Drunks 
1231 Book of Best Jokes 
1249 Best Jokes About Lovers 
1475 More Best Jokes 
1825 Stop, Look and Laugh. 

62 Gag-cartoons 

Juvenile 

44 Aesop’s Fables 
57 Rip Van Winkle 
156 Andersen’s Fairy Tales 
158 Alice in Wonderland 
188 Adventures of 
Munchausen 
391 Dog of Flanders. 
Ouida 

516 Real Adventures 


554 Child’s Garden of 
Verse 

559 Robinson Crusoe 
716 Mother Goose 
819 Strange Murders 
836 Bluebeard, Cinderella 

Literature 

79 Enoch Arden 

95 Confessions of an 

Opium Eater 

146 Snowbound; Pied Piper 
148 Strength of the Strong. 
Jack London 

152 Son of the Wolf. . 

Jack London 

177 Subjection of Women 
229 Ridiculous Women. 
Moliere 

285 Unconventional 
Amour 

289 Pepys’ Diary 
513 Travels of Marco Polo 
661 Neurotic America and 
the Sex Impulse 
799 Deserted Village. 

Oliver Goldsmith 
829 Voltaire. Clarence 
Darrow 

1569 Boccaccio—Lover and 
Chronicler of Love 
1673 Runaway Wife 

Love and Romance 

106 Frenchwoman’s Views of 
Life 

196 The Marquise: Secret 
Passion 

283 Courtship of Miles Standish 
404 Romances of Paris 
410 French Amorous Misadven¬ 
tures 

438 Secret Memoirs of French 
Royal Mistress 

540 Brightly Colored Tales of 

Passion 

541 French Love Stories of 

Many Hues 

665 Love Letters of a Parisian 
Actress 

713 Byron and the Women He 
Loved 

786 Catherine the Great and 
Her Lovers 

810 Some Polite Scandals of 
Parisian Life 
817 Her Burning Secret 

915 Mad, and Other Stories 

916 Night in Whitechapel 

917 Room No. 11 

918 Man with the Blue Eyes 

919 The Clown 

920 Queer Night in Pane 

921 Mme. Tellier’s Establish¬ 

ment 

922 Wife’s Confession 

975 Cleopatra and Her Loves 

976 Casanova: World’s Great¬ 

est Lover 

990 Wagner’s Great Love Affair 

1046 Coquette vs. a Wife 

1047 Mysterious Exiles 

1067 Splendors of a Courtesan 
1113 Love from Many Angles 
1195 First Love, and Other Tales 
1202 Forbidden Love 
1213 Romance That Balzac Lived 
1270 Among the Mormons 
1392 Confessions of a Gold 
Digger 

1428 Curious Love Affairs 
1445 Wild Women of Broadway 
1587 Amazing Loves of King 
Carol of Rumania 
1620 Merry Tales. France 
1622 Five Women and the Grand 
Passion. France 
1656 The Girdle of Aphrodite 

Philosophy 

11 A Guide to Nietzsche 
19 Nietzsche: Who He Was 
35 Facing Plain Facts of Life 

96 Dialogues of Plato 

101 Thoughts on Man. Pascal 

153 Chinese Philosophy of Life 
159 Guide to Plato 

414 Art of Happiness. Powys 
520 A Guide to Spinoza. Durant 
571 Story of Kant’s Philosophy 
671 Moral Discourses of 
Epictetus 

839 Anatole France: Laughing 
Cynic 

Religion 

4 The Age of Reason. Paine 
61 What is Religion? Tolstoy 
184 Primitive Beliefs 
593 As a Man Thinketh 
600 The Essence of the Bible 
636 Greatest Thing in the 
World 

684 Essence of Judaism 

Russian Literature 
(in English) 

24 The Kiss. Chekhov 
45 Tolstoy’s Short Stories 
ino Red Laugh. Andreyev 
103 Seven Hanged. Andreyev 
239 26 Men and a Girl. Gorky 

Science 

53 Insects and Men: Instinct 
and Reason 


92 Hypnotism Made Plain 
190 Psycho-Analysis. The key 
to Human Behavior 
217 The Puzzle of Personality 
408 Einstein's Relativity Ex¬ 
plained 

447 Auto-Suggestion 
467 Facts About Evolution 
491 Psychology for Beginners 
524 Death: and its Problems 
555 Structure of the Earth 
603 A-B-C of the Electron 
Theory 

679 Chemistry for Beginners 
727 Psychology of Affections 
761 Food and Diet 
804 Freud on Sleep and Sexual 
Dreams 

806 Facts About the Nature of 
Science 

808 Man s Debt to the Sun 
876 Curiosities of Mathematics 
1299 Origin of Life 
1429 Airplanes. How to Fly Them 
1442 Facts About Graphology 
1514 Inventions of Edison 
1595 Facts About Calendar 
1722 Fortune Telling from 
Dreams 

1754 How to Read Finger Prints 

Social Hygiene 

14 What Every Girl Should 
Know 

74 Physiology of Sex Life 
91 Manhood: Facts of Life 
98 How to Love. Wood 
172 Evolution of Sex. Wood 
189 Eugenics Made Plain 
203 Love Rights of Women 
648 Rejuvenation—Fountain of 
Youth. Fielding 
651 How to Psycho-Analyze 
Yourself 

653 What Boys Should Know 

654 What Young Men Should 

Know 

655 What Young Women 

Should Know 

656 What Married Men Should 

Know 

657 What Married Women 

Should Know 

689 Women’s Sexual Life 

690 Man’s Sexual Life 

691 The Child’s Sexual Life 
717 Modern Sexual Morality 
726 Simple Facts About 

Venereal Diseases 
782 Psycho-Analysis and the 
Mind and Body 
784 Tests Used in Psycho- 
Analysis 

800 Sex In Psychoanalysis 
864 Confidential Chats With 
Husbands 


Miscellaneous 

986 How to Talk and Debate 

987 The Art of Kissing 

988 The Art of Courtship 
1003 How to Think Logically 
1009 Typewriting Self Taught 
1018 Humorous Limericks 
1023 Popular Recitations 
1040 Bedtime Stories 

1043 Study of Woman. Balzac 

1069 Conquest of Fear 

1070 How to Fight Nervous 

Troubles 

1078 Morals in Greece and Rome 

1093 Amusing Puns 

1097 Memory: How to Develop 

1109 Spanish Self Taught 

1170 Funny Ghost Stories 

1176 A Mad Love 

1207 French Self Taught 

1221 Facts About Will Power 

1292 Best Short Stories 

1320 How to Get a Husband 

1333 Common Sense of Health 

1340 How to Get a Job 

1341 Unusual Menus 

1342 Typical Love-Problems 
1354 Book of Striking Similes 
1413 My Prison Days 

1418 Broadway Gangsters and 

Their Rackets 

1419 Curious Deaths 

1430 Shorthand Self Taught 
1434 How to Think Clearly 
1436 Strange Marriage Customs 
1476 What to Know About Your 
Sensations 

1508 Facts About Poisons 
1524 Famous Eccentric Ameri¬ 
cans 

1548 Chinese Cook Book 
1562 How to Live Long 
1633 Exploits of a Fiddler 
1677 How Army and Navy Fight 
Venereal Diseases 
1710 The Magic of Numbers 
1712 Great Dates in History 

1714 Determination vs. Free 

WiU 

1715 Funeral Services Without 

Theology 

1717 Religion and Progress 
1719 Inge's Apology for 
Christianity 
1721 Gambler's Luck 
1727 Fifty Famous Sauces 

1738 How to Win Prize Contests 

1739 Hints on Developing Per¬ 

sonality 

1740 True Prison Escapes 

1716 Mediums' Tricks and 

Rackets Exposed 
1753 Why Many Women Are 
Unattractive 

1756 Simplified Cook-Book 
1761 America’s Little Hitlers 
1826 How to Cash In On Your 
Veteran’s Benefits. The 
G.I. Bill of Rights 


HALDEMAN-JULIUS CO. 

Dept. A-1715 Girard, Kansas, U. S. A. 









THIS MONTH EXPERIENCE 
THE EXTRA COMFORT 
OF SANAPAK . . . 
the napkin that now gives you 

Sanapak is cleverly designed to fit with¬ 
out bulk, without chafing. They are softly 
faced with cotton to give you even greater 
comfort. 

But most important ... Sanapak is made 
with three special layers, including the 
famous "Pink Back”! They give you triple 
protection! All at no extra cost! 



V 1 Ga<uam««d by 
.Good Hoowkoopinj Mi 



GIVE wincfi fo 

cpuct cwtcU WITH TH 

PEERLESS A 


GUARANTIED 
FOR ALWAYS! 


Your choice of 


BATTLESHIP GRAY 


BURGUNDY, NAVY 


EBONY BUCK 


See your dealer 
or write direct 


PIUS FED. TAX 
These ore the new 
streamlined pen and 
pencil sets that are 
literally flying over 
paper to make writ¬ 
ing history. 


New Y«rk 11, N.Y.-Dept.h 


happen, the prop man neglected to 
fill the revolvers with fresh blank 
cartridges, and all the embarrassed 
G-men including Dan found them¬ 
selves doing heroic battle with guns 
which wouldn’t fire! 

For 85 consecutive weeks he played 
the minor part and then suddenly 
was switched to the leading role of 
the crippled architect. Getting a job 
no longer was a problem after that, 
and when the played closed, he went 
immediately into the role of a divinity 
student in “Many Mansions” which 
in turn led to parts in “Ned McCobb’s 
Daughter,” and a revival of “Rain.” 
Then came “Missouri Legend” in 
which he played the first of the 
sneaky villain roles which later car¬ 
ried him to fame; he was the “dirty 
little coward who shot Mr. Howard 
and laid poor Jesse James in his 
grave.” 

“From then on I was a marked 
man,” he recalled. “Actually, the only 
other time I played a ‘right guy’ was 
as the tank driver with Bogart in 
‘Sahara’—and it’s the only picture 
people never remember I was in!” 

Even so, Dan was glad he made 
“Sahara”—it gave him one picture he 
could allow his sons to see! He has 
kept them carefully away from all 
the others, fearful of what his por¬ 
trayals of evil men might do to their 
impressionable minds of 3 and 6 
years respectively. 

“At that the boys are beginning to 
hear the other kids talk about what 
a nasty heel I am,” Dan related. “The 
other day Peter, the elder, came to 
me almost in tears because of some 
crack a playmate had made about me 
being the meanest man in the movies. 
The only thing I could do was try to 
explain it as kind of a game I play 
where I make believe I am someone 
else.” 

After “Missouri Legend” Dan was 
cast as the treacherous, half-witted 
brother, Leo Hubbard, in “The Little 
Foxes” starring Tallulah Bankhead. 
By all odds he made Leo the nasti¬ 
est of the nasty Hubbard clan, and 
against mighty stiff competition from 
the rest of the cast. The critics were 
lavish in their praise of his delinea¬ 
tion, and when Sam Goldwyn decided 
to film the play, he signed Dan under 
long term contract to play his original 
role in the screen version. The year 
was 1941. 

“Frankly, I had thought of Holly¬ 
wood before that,” Dan admitted, 
“but I decided the smart thing was 
to wait until Hollywood wanted me. 
It seldom paid, I noticed, to go knock¬ 
ing at Hollywood’s door uninvited.” 

The deluge of critical acclaim fol¬ 
lowing the release of the picture, “The 
Little Foxes,” led all of Dan’s friends 
to predict boldly that thereafter he 
could “write his own ticket in Holly¬ 
wood!” Modesty forebade such an ex¬ 
cessive self-evaluation of his talents, 
but Dan was puzzled, and then pan¬ 
icked, to find himself sitting month 
after month (six of them in all!) with 
no new assignment. He asked for a 
release from his contract and has 
worked on a freelance basis ever 
since. 

“That way I am able to turn down 
weak parts which might hurt my 
career,” he explained. “Also, it is a 
safeguard against making too many 
pictures in any one year. I made that 
mistake last year when I made six 
pictures, but even so I turned down 
ten parts. This year I am making 
only two, so the public won’t say, 


‘Cripes, there’s that Duryea guy 
again!’ and get sick to death of me. 
Most fortunate for me from the be¬ 
ginning is the fact that I have worked 
only in big budget pictures with big 
name stars. Without that protective 
break, I probably would have been a 
has-been long before now—or a 
never-was!” 

“The Little Foxes,” however, set 
the pattern for Duryea performances, 
and among the classic heels he has 
portrayed are numbered the show-off 
gangster in “Ball of Fire,” a Nazi spy 
in “Ministry of Fear,” the selfish 
brother in “Valley of Decision,” the 
weakling son in “Mrs. Parkington,” 
the sarcastic sportswriter in “Pride of 
the Yankees,” the blackmailer in 
“Woman in the Window,” the killer 
in “Along Came Jones,” and the'de¬ 
batable squirt in the new Durbin 
thriller, “Lady On a Train.” In his 
latest, “Scarlet Street,” he plays a 
cheap, chiseling crook—the closest 
approach the Hays Office would par- 
mit to the part as originally conceived 
in the play, “La Chienne.” 

Luckily, it doesn’t bother Dan that 
he has been typed; long ago, he said, 
he became resigned to being an A-l 
louse. It is no matter of luck, how¬ 
ever, that the “typing” has not spelled 
finis to his career as it has for so 
many others caught in the same web; 
only his remarkable versatility in 
creating unpleasant characters, and 
his brilliant shading of them into 
powerful portraits, has saved him 
from that fate. 

He doesn’t know what he does, Dan 
insists, to make his characterizations 
so unusual and inevitably so loathe- » 
some. Sometimes it may be merely a 
bit of “business” as it was in the 
stand-out scene in “Mrs. Parkington;” 
in that, you remember, he stood care¬ 
lessly toying with his watch chain 
while speaking the words which 
broke his father’s heart. Sometimes 
it is a matter of deliberate under¬ 
playing, or an unexpected expression 
or tone of voice which capitalizes on 
the surprise element and thus pro-- 
duces a sort of shock; a smile, for 
instance, where you anticipated a 
leer, or a gentle voice where you ex- 

E ected a snarl. Usually, however, it 
oils down to “thinking what you’re 
saying, thinking as the character 



Meanie” roles started when Dan came to 
Hollywood to play his "Little Foxes" role. 


















The Duryea family live a simple life in their modest home. Dan did well as an advertising 
salesman in White Plains, N. Y. until he had a nervous breakdown and had to quit. 


would be thinking, and then doing 
what is most natural.” That’s as near 
as he can explain it anyway. 

One quirk in Dan completely baf¬ 
fles Hollywood. Most actors, once 
they have gained sufficient impor¬ 
tance to rate the privilege, dash like 
mad to see the “rushes” of completed 
scenes. Dan refuses to look at them. 

“It’s not conceit or lack of interest,” 
he said. “It’s just that I probably 
would not like the character as I was 
creating him and would want to make 
certain changes despite my lack of a 
proper perspective on the picture as a 
whole. I’d be going off half-cocked 
most of the time, which is both a 
stupid and a dangerous procedure. So 
I prefer to wait until all the little 
pieces are blended into the final 
whole before passing judgment. Be¬ 
sides, the director knows what he 
wants, and if I’m not giving it to 
him, he’ll tell me quickly enough.” 

Equally unorthodox, but just as 
soundly sensible, is a notion Dan has 
about the rearing of his sons. Peter 
and Richard are allowed to sit at the 
small bar in the Duryea home, for 
instance, when Dan and Helen are 
having a before-dinner cocktail. 

“Of course they are given only 
grape juice or ginger ale in their 
glasses,” Dan explained, “but they 
feel they are being treated as equals. 
I’m a firm believer in children learn¬ 
ing about things at home; and han¬ 
dling the matter in this fashion, they 
never will have that teen-age urge 
to slip off and see what it’s like to 
have a few drinks. Instead if it being 
a forbidden sweet, and therefore 
twice as desirable, they will know 
that when they are old enough, they 


may have a drink right at home if 
they want it.” 

Dan nurses one not-so-secret am¬ 
bition. Comes the day when he is 
finished with double-crossing men 
and slapping women (“but not too 
soon, please; it’s nice work and I’ve 
got it!”) he wants to play Hamlet. No 
fooling! He’s the original Hamlet fan, 
and hasn’t missed a Melancholy Dane 
on the stage since he was old enough 
to know the score. 

“Yeah, and what’s wrong with 


that?” he challenged, bristling with 
mock menace. “Even a louse can 
aspire to the finer things in life!” 

As a matter of record, I bet he 
could play Hamlet; and probably 
will, some day not too distant. When 
this happens I want two on the aisle. 
Meanwhile I’ll" settle for anything he 
deals in dastardly dirt. 

Judging by his fan mail, so will 
every other movie goer in the coun¬ 
try. He’s a solid sender, that onef 
The End 



Win friends, Win love 


I waited for 
him but she 
was smarter 
-she WROTE! i 


to HIM on 


-r\ \\\ \l. 5* H * u ’ “55 an ^. 

SI. J xt^ss^»tss&s»- 

Send «beta*- 

coup° n 

FREE! As a gift for your promptness in moiling coupon wfth your dollar, we will send you your lucky Birthstone 
Story.” Know your birthstone. leorn how to ochieve lasting love, glamour, riches, ond power. WRITE TODAY! 


only * 1 # 00 

(GARTNER PRINTING A: LITHOGRAPH CO.—Dept. 4 I 
1186 South Alvarado Street, Los Angeles 4. California f 

I Send me a box of pleasing "Half and Half" S/a/ionery im» 
mediately. I'm enclosing □ money order Q check □ $1 bill. 
I Send my Lucky Birthstone Story as a free-gift for promptness ■ 

| my birthday is... 

Name (please print).-.j 

Address .-..... j 

k City A Zone. ...State. .j 

\ 


i m PRINTING AND 

LITHOGRAPH CO 

186 South Alvarado Street, Los Angeles 4. California 


63 




















64 



EYELASH DARKENER 

To keep lasbes and brows bewitchingly dark 
and alluring . . . even after swimming, crying 
or perspiring, use “Dark-Eyes”. This indelible 
darkener never runs, smarts or smudges. One 
application lasts 4 to 5 weeks .. . thus ending 
daily eye make-up bother. Caution: Use only 
as directed on the label. Try ir! Get a package 
of “Dark-Eyes” today! 

$1.00 (plus tax) at leading drug and depart¬ 
ment stores. If your favorite dealer does not 
yet carry "Dark-Eyes”, mail coupon today! 

["""'Dark'Eyes 
J 218 S. Wabash 


Dept. AC-6 

h Ave., Chicago 4, Illinois 


--- I 

I enclose $1.20 (tax included) For regular size I 
I package ol “Dark-Eyes", and directions. i 

| Check shades: □ Black □ Brown 


I 

' • 

Address •.. I 


I Name 

J 
I 


State. 


I 




■h 


Mod&uiWioui 

Relieves J 

Miseries of ^Qfl£|£ 

Duning Night 



/ Penetrates ^Stimulates 


to upper bronchial 
tubes with its soothing 
medicinal vapors. 


the chest and back 
surfaces like a nice, 
warming poultice. 


Warming, soothing relief—grand 
relief—comes when you rub good 
old Vicks VapoRub on the throat, 
chest and back at bedtime. Its 
penetrating-stimulating action 
keeps on working for hours. In¬ 
vites restful sleep. And often by 
morning most misery of the cold is 
gone. No wonder most mothers use 
VapoRub. Try 
it tonight — 
home-proved' 


WICKS 

V VapoRub 


LUCKY LADY 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 331 


imtm? 


what you really wanted to be was a 
fashion designer. You earned some 
money working at a local soda foun¬ 
tain, but life really became interest¬ 
ing when you got a job in a depart¬ 
ment store because that was getting 
close to the Career—that important 
designing job. 

That’s what Barbara did and when 
she had saved a little money her 
father agreed to help her finance her 
studies in commercial art at the 
Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. And 
so—what happened? Artists who had 
already “arrived” glimpsed the pretty 
little student and persuaded her to 
model for them. This pleased her be¬ 
cause the money she earned would 
help to pay for her own lessons. How¬ 
ever, her struggle to be an artist 
turned into a losing fight. 

When she had been in Chicago 
about two years, A1 Seaman, of the 
Chicago Models Bureau, sent her 
picture to an R.K.O. executive in 
Hollywood and that gentleman was 
so impressed that he stopped in 
Chicago, on his way from New York 
to Hollywood, to have a look at 
Barbara. A more surprised girl would 
have been difficult to find. 

Barbara’s Fate or guiding spirit is 
certainly a fast worker because two 
weeks later she found herself in Hol¬ 
lywood, contract already signed, play¬ 
ing her first screen role in a little 
number called “Gildersleeve’s Bad 
Day.” By this time she was beyond 
being surprised. She was just plain 
frightened. “Wasn’t it incredible?” she 
breathes, adding “You can see what 

I mean about Fate—and things_” 

Well, can’t you? 

On this totally unpremeditated 
journey she brought with her two 
suitcases. One had “some clothes” in 
it; whatever garments she could put 
her hands on in her hurried and fran¬ 
tic packing. The other was filled with 
letters, snapshots and clippings—her 
most treasured possessions. Not that 
she ever looks at them, you under¬ 
stand. She just can’t bear to part 
with them. 

Barbara, now playing one of the 
plum-of-the-year roles opposite Rob¬ 
ert Young, in “Lady Luck,” is a mem¬ 
ber of one of Hollywood’s most amus- 
mg households. But to explain that 
Ill have to go back and tell a bit 

about Bill Williams. You know Bill_ 

the fascinating guy in “Those En¬ 
dearing Young Charms” and “Dead¬ 
line at Dawn!” Barbara and Bill were 
signed by R.K.O. at about the same 
time and now he is definitely the Man 
in her life. 

They met just before they both were 
cast in “West of the Pecos” and Bar¬ 
bara says now, “I should have guessed 
then how it was going to be with us 
Bill was shot in the first reel of the 
picture and I felt perfectly terrible 
about it. He looked so dead lying 
there and somehow I thought I 
couldn’t bear it!” 

She recovered over a coke with 
him at the studio commissary and 
after that they nearly killed them¬ 
selves partaking of pop until Bill 
finally plucked up courage to invite 
her to dinner. That made them feel 
really acquainted,” although neither 
of them is sure whether or not they 
were ever actually introduced to one 
another. 


Meanwhile Bill was quietly being 
divorced from the girl he had mar¬ 
ried and from whom he had been 
separated years before. No one here 
knew about it until the divorce was 
several months old. It takes a year 
in California, you know, for a divorce 
to become final. 

Now about the household. When I 
asked Barbara, casually, what kinds 
of parties she liked to give, she burst 
into giggles. “I’ll just have to tell you 
the truth,” she announced. “We can’t 
give any parties! We haven’t any 
chairs.” It developed that “we” meant 
Harold and Annette Soldinger with 
whom Barbara shares a house in the 
Valley. Annette is Barbara’s stand- 
in. You see, the Soldingers had a 
house—but no furniture. Barbara had 
a little bit of furniture she had ac¬ 
cumulated while living at the Studio 
Club—but very little! So the three 
pooled their possessions and share 
expenses. Oh, yes! Bill is in on this, 
too! He has a small furnished apart¬ 
ment but he likes home-cooked meals. 
So-o-o they have all put themselves 
on strict weekly budgets, and every¬ 
one chips in and a merry time is had 
by everyone—no doubt—although the 
thought of all that bookkeeping makes 
me shudder. 

“You know,” Barbara muses, “I 
used to think that when a girl signed 
a motion picture contract she im¬ 
mediately burst forth with m inks , 
emeralds and swimming pools. Just 
now—well, things are growing even 
more complicated because Annette 
has had a message from the stork!” 

They have their fun, though, mostly 
at. the Malibu ranch of the Weir 
Brothers, people ' Bill knew in his 
vaudeville days. These are outdoor, 
barbecue affairs with the men doing 
most of the cooking and with every¬ 
one, talented or not, required to “put 
on his act.’ Most of the guests really 
are talented and thousands of dollars’ 
worth of top flight entertainment is 
squandered on the lucky few who are 
privileged to be present at these 
shindigs. 

Barbara assures you that she is a 
very good cook and can turn out some 
pretty fancy dishes, only—well—she 
never seems able to have everything 
cooked to a turn at the same moment. 
„} m a specialist, I guess,” she says. 

I can do a beautiful job with one dish 
at a time. Getting a whole meal re¬ 
duces me to hysterics.” 

She dresses beautifully, despite her 
limited budget. Edward Stevenson, 

K. K. O. designer, sighs happily that 
she is one actress who knows and ap¬ 
preciates harmony of line and color 
and who knows what is right for her. 
She likes herself in what Eddie calls 
glow colors.” Heady corals, violets, 
golds, rusts and warm autumn 
browns. Pastels make her faintly ill 

,? h ®, c ? n ’ t bear what she calls, 
clutter m her costumes—tassels, 
fringes, ruffles, bangles and so on. 
She likes to “dress down.” 

Her favorite things in the world, in 
the order of their importance are (1) 
babies; almost any baby will do, but 
she is especially ecstatic over her 
young nieces and nephews. She yearns 
for a flock of tots of her own. (2) 
Tne warm feeling of a family getting 
together ‘Holidays are such fun— 
especially Christmas!” (3) Surprises. 





















ADVICE FOR 


ABUSED SKIN 


DON'T BE AFRAID AND STOP W0RRYIN6 NOW ABODT EXTERNAL 
SKIN TRODBLES. FOLLOW THESE EASY DIRECTIONS 


By feetLj, Me+nfduA. 


Have you ever stopped to realize that the leading screen stars that you 
admire, as well as the beautiful models who have lovely, soft white skin, were 
all born just like you with a lovely smooth skin? 

Almost everyone can have a natural, normal complexion which is in itself 
beauty. All you must do is follow a few simple rules. Models and screen 
stars must give their skin special attention. So should you, because everyone 
looks at your face. Your social success may depend upon your being good 
looking, because a lovely skin may be a short cut to success in love and busi¬ 
ness. Your pleasure is worth it; and you owe it to yourself to give your 
complexion a chance to be more beautiful. 

Medical science gives us the truth about a lovely skin. There are small 
specks of dust in the air all the time 


When these little specks, which are 
in the air get into an open pore in 
your skin, they can in time cause the 
pore to become larger and more sus¬ 
ceptible to dust and infection. These 
open pores begin to form blackheads 
, which become infected and bring you 
the misery of pimples, irritations or 
blemishes. When you neglect your 
skin by not giving it the necessary 
care it requires, you leave yourself 
wide open for externally caused skin 
miseries. When you know that your 
skin is smooth, white and fine, you 
have more confidence and it helps 
improve your personality, and it 
helps improve your entire well being 
Your skin is priceless, yet it costs 
you only a few pennies daily to 
keep it normal, natural and love¬ 
ly. Many women never realize or 
even suspect that the difference be¬ 
tween a glamorous complexion and 
an ordinary one may be caused by 
having blackheads and pimples. 

The proper attention with the 


double Viderm treatment may mean 
the difference between enjoying the 
confidence a fine skin gives you or 
the embarrassment of an ugly abused 
skin. The double Viderm treatment 
is a formula prescribed by a doctor, 
and costs you only a few cents 
daily. This treatment consists of two 
jars. One jar contains Viderm Skin 
Cleanser, a jelly-like formula which 
penetrates and acts as an antiseptic 
upon your pores. After you use this 
special Viderm Skin Cleanser, apply 
the Viderm Fortified Medicated Skin 
Cream. You rub this in, leaving an 
almost invisible protective covering 
for the surface of your skin. 

This double treatment has worked 
wonders for so many cases of abused 
skin, it may help you, too, or your 
money will be refunded. Use it for 
ten days. You have everything to 
gain and nothing to lose. It is a 
guaranteed treatment. Enjoy it. 

Use your double Viderm treatment 
every day until your skin is smoother 
and clearer Then, use it only once 
a week to remove stale make-up 
and dust specks that infect your 
pores and to aid in healing external irritations. When you help prevent 
blackheads, you help prevent externally caused skin miseries and pimples. 
While your two jars and the doctor’s directions are on the way to you, be 
sure to give your face enough attention and wash it as often as is necessary 
Wash with warm water and then cleanse with water as cold as you can stand, 
in order to freshen, stimulate and help close your pores. After you receive 
everything, read your directions carefully, and then go right to it with these 
two fine formulas. 

Just mail your name and address to Betty Memphis, care of The New York 
Skin Laboratory, 206 Division Street, Dept. 233, New York City 2, New York. 
By return mail you will receive both of the Viderm formulas, with full direc¬ 
tions for using Viderm Skin Cleanser and Viderm Fortified Medicated Skin 
Cream The doctor’s directions and both jars are packed in a sealed carton, 
safety sealed. On delivery, pay two dollars plus postage If you wish, you can 
save the postage fee by mailing your two dollars with your letter. If you are 
in any way dissatisfied, your money will be cheerfully refunded. Both of the 
formulas you use have been fully tested and proven, and are reliable for you 
If they don’t help you your treatments cost nothing. After you have received 
your Viderm, if you have any questions to ask concerning abused skin, just 
send them in.—ADV. 


65 



66 


ORDER BY MAIL FROM HOLLYWOOD 



*m« 


bottom*;/*/ 




njJi 

SEND 
NO 


MONEY 


00WN2EAT SWEATED... *4 99 
SERENADE BLOUSE .... *2.99 

Brim Bl«n Oavtafe 

• Leading Lady brings you America's best triple feature, 
real pre-war quality, made and acclaimed in Hollywood for 
all America. Springin’ for Summer, bright and smart. The 
"Belle-Bottom** skirt la terrifically different. Fine rayon; 
full cut; 5 King size gores. 3 in back—2 in front. The elon* 
gated waistband cuts the hip line; accentuates the skirt 
flare; smart tucking “flexes for spread", a Leading Lady ex¬ 
clusive. Convenient side zipper. The Serenade Blouse is a 
perfect complement. Mannish tailored, with the exclusive 
Bobby Bane long wing collar. Fashioned from expensive 
materials, originated in men's fine shirts. The Downbeat 
Sweater is lOOO'fr wool. Soft Australian type full bodied 
weave; Sloppy Joe Senior. Step into the style headlines with 
these year-round beauties. More exciting when seen than 
these sketches from actual stock. Catalogue enclosed. 



LIADIN6 LADY 
Of HOLLYWOOD 
S42 S. Broadway. Las Aaqalas 13. Calif. Dapt. 211 I 

tend the f©n*wlne: I’ll i>ay Po«tm*n tdmtlied prior plus p«rt**r u«1 _ 

10c handling charge I mm4tntm4 I may ntei far f«U rrfuatf if art I 
tabfflad By 5-day cnaparitM. 

Q B«tl«-BotU>a Skirl $4.09. (Circle 1st and 2nd choice of colon) | 
Nary Kdly Brown Bed Aqua Gold ■ 

Slac: 14 2d 2X 3ft (Circle KUc) 

□ Serenade Blow. $2.99. White Only 

SUf: 32 34 36 3H (Circle Sfer) 

□ Doxubeat Sweater, $4.99. (Circle 1st and 2nd choice of eotm) 

Aqua Sun Yellow Grey Lush Pink White m 

Site: 34 36 38 40 (Circle Sire) I 

Mark bow Many af each desired la large seuam at left. g 

Be sure ta circle calm and sins. 


PRINT NAME... 


I 

I 


ADDRESS_ 



As in the case of babies, almost -any 
surprise will do: a gag pfesent to 
make her laugh, a birthday card or a 
really nice present. She adores them 
all. 

Presents, she thinks (except at 
Christmas), are more fun if they 
aren’t for any special occasion. She 
sends her family “Happy Friday pres¬ 
ents” or just “Happened to be think¬ 
ing of you” gifts. And she and “Wil¬ 
lie” constantly exchange absurd pack¬ 
ages and greetings. 

By the way, Barbara is the only 
person in the world who is privileged 
to call Bill Williams “Willie.” From 
her he loves it. From anyone else— 
well, I fear a short punch in the nose 
might ensue! 

She has no pet personal extrava¬ 
gances. “I know too much about the 
value of money,” she explains. “I 
never buy anything for myself with¬ 
out first weighing in my mind whether 
I really want and need it, and wheth¬ 
er it is really worth what.it is going 
to cost. I can’t bear to think I’m not 
getting my money’s worth!” 

She loves horseback riding better 
than any other outdoor sport and she 
enjoys bowling occasionally. She likes 
to watch football and basketball 
games. 

Barbara thinks one of her worst 
faults is that she is a “phone cud- 
dler.” She loves to curl up in a big 
chair with the telephone and talk 
and talk and talk, until other people 
nearly go mad, especially those people 
who are trying to reach her on im¬ 
portant business. Then, too, she is 
what she calls a “squirrel by in¬ 
stinct” and this also annoys the people 
around her. She saves letters, clip¬ 
pings, photographs, scraps of mate¬ 
rials, theater programs, buttons and 
stacks and stacks of women’s maga¬ 
zines which contain household hints 
she thinks she may find useful some 
day. 

Bill, who is a tidy soul, seriously 
deplores these tendencies in his be¬ 
loved and persistently makes her 
presents of filing cabinets and neat, 
sectioned boxes and cases for the 
disposal of these objects. Only he can’t 
get her to put them into the boxes. 
Once he stood over her sternly and 
made her paste snapshots into an 
album, but it was a pretty strenuous 
occasion and he hasn’t repeated it, 
since then. 

He has managed however, to per¬ 
suade her to be more punctual than 
she was when she first came to Holly¬ 
wood. She admits to a slight feeling 
of surprise at finding that things run 
much more smoothly and pleasantly 
when she manages to be on time for 
appointments. “I never imagined it 
would make so much difference,” she 
remarks. “And it’s not much trouble, 
once you get used to it!” 

About the mental telepathy—there 
has always been a strong bond be¬ 
tween Barbara and her mother and 
they are both convinced that they 
communicate with one another quite 
inadvertently at times. Not long ago 
Barbara suddenly; said, “I have to go 
home! It’s something about Mother... 
And as soon as it could be arranged 
she was on her way. When she ar¬ 
rived, unannounced, someone went to 
her mother’s bedroom and said, “You 
have a guest.” Mrs. Hale said, “I 
know . . . ” and called, “Come in, 
Barbara! I’m so glad you were able to 
get here!” 

She had been very ill, so ill that 
Barbara hadn’t been told, pending 
doctors’ examinations. But Barbara 


insists that she knew her mother 
needed her and Mrs. Hale never 
doubted for a moment that her child 
would come. 

“You see,” Barbara says, very ear¬ 
nestly, “when you are a certain kind 
of person . . . things . . . well, unex- 

F lainable things just happen to you. 

can say, ‘I’ve been awfully lucky' 
but that doesn’t really explain any¬ 
thing. If you’re the sort of person to 
whom Things happen—you can never 
plan. You can only try to be ready 
and worthy and susceptible to sugges¬ 
tion. 

“I didn’t plan to be a model. I had 
something entirely different in mind. 
I certainly didn’t plan to be an actress. 
But now that an acting career has 
sort of ‘happened to me,’ I have an 
assured feeling that it’s right, that it 
was meant all along for me to become 
a screen actress. 

“The first thing you learn about 
acting is that it is dreadfully hard 
work, especially all the things you 
have to do when you are not in front 
of a camera. The next thing you have 
to learn is that if you get too frantic, 
work too hard, it begins to show on 
you. It ages you and puts strain into 
your face and your efforts. Probably 
the hardest thing you have to learn 
about this business is to concentrate 
on it, give it your best efforts, while 
still trying to relax at it. And believe 
me, that requires concentration.” 

Many more experienced people than 
Barbara have realized this all-im¬ 
portant theory too late. 

Despite the fact that the little Hale 
says she can have no Plans for her 
future—between you and me, she has. 
At least she has a consuming de¬ 
sire. It’s for babies of her own and, 
what’s more, for taking a real and 
active part in looking after under¬ 
privileged babies everywhere. “You 
couldn’t feel right about your own 
much-loved, well-taken-care-of in¬ 
fant if you weren’t doing something 
about another baby who was deprived 
of love and care!” she says. And she 
means it, with a sort of dedication to 
something very dear to her. 

And now, I’ve saved a tidbit for 
dessert in this story about Barbara— 
and “Willie.” You’ll be seeing Holly¬ 
wood’s cutest pair of lovers co- 
starred some time early in 1946, in a 
picture which is tentatively titled, 
''“A Likely Story!” And won’t that 
be fun! 

The End 



Bill and Babs are saving money -for "Der Tag." 












DARLING. THIS 
STIRLING 
-■ CHTCR 
CIRTAINLY 
HUPS! 


Every seconds someone enters a hospital! YOU—or some¬ 
one in your family—may be next! Good hospital insurance is im¬ 
portant. Provide cash to help pay the many bills that pile up when 
accident, sickness, or a needed operation sends you or a mem¬ 
ber of your family to the hospital. At special low family rates 
this new Sterling Family Hospital and Surgical Policy pro¬ 
vides cash benefits to help pay your expenses for hospital 
room and board, operating room, X-ray, anesthetic, medi¬ 
cines, and other stated hospital expenses — and also for 
doctor’s fee for operations. One policy covers each and 
every member of your family. 


FOR YOU and Your Family 

HOSPITAL EXPENSES (Tor) 

Pays expanses for Room and 
Board, up to $4.00 a day for as 
many as 90 days in any policy 
year—no matter how many times 
you are in the hospitall 

PLUS ... A total of $50.00 for addi¬ 
tional hospital expenses incurred up 
to . . . $10.00 for operating room, 
$5.00 for laboratory fees, $5.00 for 
medicines. $10.00 for anesthetics, 
$10.00 for physiotherapy, $5.00 for 
X-rays, $5.00 for ambulance service. 
These benefits payable for EACH 
hospitalization. 

PLUS OPERATION EXPENSES 

. . . provides benefits from $5.00 to 
$100.00 for surgical operations, 
whether performed in hospital, at 
home, or in doctor's office. 

CHILDBIRTH BENEFIT. ..Pays 
$4.00 a day for the usual 10-day 
period of maternity confinement. 
(After policy is in force 1 year.) 

• 

Policy covers accidents immediately 
. . . sickness after policy in force 
30 days . . . just a few specified sick¬ 
nesses require that policy be in force 
for 6 months. 


SPECIAL FAMILY RATES — Take the Expense Out of Hospital Care 


You are not limited to just one hos¬ 
pitalization—this policy pays benefits no 
matter how many times you or any in¬ 
sured member of your family has to go 
to the hospital, up to 90 days in any 
policy year for EACH person, as pro¬ 
vided, The money is paid direct to you, 
and you may use any doctor and any 
hospital anywhere. You may insure as 
many in the family as you wish—anyone 

IN ONE POLICY...PROTECT 

FATHER 
MOTHER 


s 


now in good health, from 3 months old to 65 years. 

Insure With Confidence 

This low-cost Family Hospital and Surgical Policy is 
issued by the nationally known Sterling Insurance 
Company, a legal reserve insurance company with 
over $2,000,000.00 surplus for policyholders. There 
are more than 500,000 Sterling-protected men, 
women, and children throughout America. Over 
$3,000,000.00 cash benefits already paid on Sterling 
policies, and more being paid every day. 

10 DAY TRIAL OFFER —Mail Coupon Today 

Rush coupon below now for Policy on 10-Day Trial 
Offer which gives you opportunity to have actual 
policy in force protecting you and your family with 
full benefits while you make up your mind. There’s 
no obligation of any kind ... mail this coupon today. 
No agent will call on you! 


Sterling Insurance Company 
N4149 Sterling Bldg., Chicago 11,111. 

Send me, without obligation, your 10-Day Trial Offer of Low-Cost 
Family Hospital ond Surgical Plan. No agent will calL 


NAME. 


terling Insurance l^o. 


ADDRESS. 


CITY.STATE. 




N4149 Sterling Building • CHICAGO 11, ILLINOIS 


□ Check here if you wont details of new Life Insurance Plan at 
Vi cost for first 5 years. 


I 

I 

I 

I 


l 


67 



























HANDY MAN 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 311 


68 



THE QUALITY RICE IN THE 
BLUE AND YELLOW PACKAGE 


They're coming back, fhose plump, sparkling clean, 
whole grains that have made WondeRice famous 
for quality throughout the country. In small lots 
at first, because WondeRice quality standards limit 
quantity — but in greater amounts later, as soon 
as conditions make increased packaging possible. 
Look for WondeRice in the blue and yellow package. 


WALTON RICE MILL. INC.. STUTTGART. ARK. 




BUILDUP 
RED BLOOD 

to get more 

STRCN6TH 

■ If you lack BLOOD-IRON! ■ 


You girls and women who suffer so 
from simple anemia that you are pale, 
feel tired, weak, “dragged out”—this 
may be due to lack of blood-iron. 

So start right away—try Lydia E. 
Pinkham’s TABLETS—one of the best 
and quickest home ways to help build 
up red blood to get more strength 
and energy—in such cases. 

Pinkham’s Tablets are one of the 
greatest blood-iron tonics you can buy. 
Just try them for 30 days—then see if 
you, too, don’t remarkably benefit. 

Lydia E. Pinkham’s TAGiCTS 


exotic workmen, you have to employ 
but one lone man! Mr. Dana Andrews. 

Naturally, some of Dana’s past jobs 
have blossomed with more fruitful 
experience than others. Take the as¬ 
signment of being a political reform¬ 
er: Dana was only about sixth or 
seventh in command. Dana’s father 
was a minister and father of eight 
sons. He and an attorney friend in the 
Texas town in which the family were 
living, learned that the local law 
makers and law enforcers were in 
cahoots with the shady gentry from 
back in the hills. The Reverend Mr. 
Andrews and his attorney friend 
launched some corrective propaganda, 
and all the little Andrews assisted in 
disseminating the good word by the 
use of fists. According to Dana, “The 
sons of ministers are traditionally 
reputed to be the most unruly bunch 
in town; we did not plan to cross up 
tradition, especially when the sons of 
the opposition made a slighting re¬ 
mark about our dad.” 

In the midst of the crusade, the 
Reverend Mr. Andrews was called to 
another parish. As it was situated in 
a university town in which the older 
Andrews children could continue their 
educations, the post was accepted. 

During the summer, energetic Dana 
made a deal to work for a local apiar¬ 
ist (Little did he dream that he would 
also have to deal with B’s in Holly¬ 
wood.) Dana liked the work; it was 
interesting. So interesting, in fact, 
that Maurice Maeterlinck (who also 
liked blue birds) wrote a book about 
bees. This, Dana bought at once and 
read. He discovered that bees were 
friendly creatures; they crawled on 
his neck, hands and arms (he never 
wore a net as some workers did), and 
committed no havoc. If, occasionally, 
a bee forgot his good manners and 
nipped Dana, the result was a pin 
prick that lasted an hour. 

So great was Dana’s enthusiasm 
that he encouraged his older brother 
to join him amid the clover and honey. 
“Sounds good to me,” said the brother 
—and retained that notion for about 
three hours. On his first morning, the 
brother was stung half a dozen times; 
the wounds puffed up like mumps, 
began to throb, and turned purple. 
He left, calling back curses on bees, 
hives, clover, honey, Dana . . . and 
Maeterlinck. 

One day not long ago, Dana strolled 
into a Hollywood market and selected 
a certain cut of beef. When the butch¬ 
er emerged from the back room, tossed 
a roast on the scales and called out a 
price, Dana looked at the man in dis¬ 
belief. “That isn’t what I ordered,” he 
said mildly. 

Said the butcher, “Look, friend, 
I’ve been cutting meat for a long time 
—I know my business. When I go to 
a movie, I don’t expect to tell you 
how to act. How about each of us 
sticking to his own talent?” 

Grinned Dana, “I used to cut meat 
in Texas. If I had a nickel for every 
steer. . . .” 

The butcher tossed aside the roast, 
and saying, “In that case. . . he 
went to the back room and returned 
with the item for which Dana had 
originally asked. 

Dana wasn’t fooling. During one 
J summer vacation he served in the 
I market all morning, segmenting 


halves of beef, and in the afternoon 
he hopped on a horse and rode de¬ 
livery service. 

During two other summers, Dana 
worked as a plumber’s assistant. The 
first summer he was the Duke of 
Draino; he learned fast, and he ap¬ 
plied what he learned. He worked 
under the close supervision of his 
journeyman employer, and was con¬ 
sidered to be a one-man pipe dream. 
The second summer found this em¬ 
ployer showered with work and 
flushed with financial success; he set 
Dana to work installing the plumbing 
in an apartment building under con¬ 
struction. It was a rush job, and a 
highly important one at that. Dana 
gave it top priority haste, installing 
pipe, making connections, and lead¬ 
ing joiners. After him, in hot pursuit, 
came the plasterers, who closed the 
walls. 

The owner, a man with the soul of 
Sherlock Holmes, came around to 
comment on the speed, and efficiency 
of his workmen. Idly he turned on a 
washbasin faucet in one of the bath¬ 
rooms; instantly the shower sent 
forth a spray of cold water. Horri¬ 
fied, he instituted an investigation. 
In some apartments, a twist of a 
shower faucet turned on the bath tub 
water, and a revolution of bathtub 
faucet operated the wash basin out¬ 
let. 

Go ahead and laugh. Dana didn’t. 
He got fired; being separated from 
the plumbing business was an awful 
wrench. All the plaster over the 
plumbing connections had to be re¬ 
moved, the pipes had to be re-joined, 
then the plaster had to be replaced— 
and the despondent plumber had to 
pay for the work. The final job cost 
him considerably more than he had 
been paid for his original work. 

Nowadays, when something goes 
wrong in the liquid conduit system 
in the Andrews home, Dana rushes 
to the telephone and summons the 
nearest plumber. He is a man who 
cannot trust himself with a pipe. He 
smokes only cigarettes. (Gag.) 

Then there was that period of serv¬ 
ing as a Burroughs Bookkeeping Ma¬ 
chine Operator and general utility 
man in a small bank. Dana liked the 
orderly progression of numbers out 
of his machine; he liked the business¬ 
like clucking of the mechanism as it 
tossed out debits, credits, and bal¬ 
ances. He also liked the importance 
of delivering a certain envelope to 
the post office every Saturday noon. 

The envelope contained all the large 
denomination bills taken in during 
the week, and it was mailed to a 
parent bank. 

On this particular Saturday, Dana 
stopped at the drug store and picked 
up a copy of the Saturday Evening 
Post, then he slipped the envelope 
just inside the Post’s front cover 
because it was known around town 
that large sums of money were dis¬ 
patched from time to time, and Dana 
didn’t want anyone to get the idea 
that he would be an easy touch, if 
touched with the business end of a 
.45. 

With the bank roll happily protected 
by the SEP, Dana proceeded to the 
Post Office, whistling softly on the 
fair summer air. Approaching the 
mail chute, he glanced around, then 















lifted the top cover of his magazine. 
Nothing there. 

Swallowing hard, his hands grown 
as fingerless as boxing gloves, he 
■ tried to leaf over the magazine. Then, 
in desperation, he turned it over and 
shook it so that any loose object would 
fall free. All he got for his pains was 
one of those tiresome subscription- 
renewal blanks. 

He swung around and charged along 
the sidewalk, head down, eyes scrap¬ 
ing the concrete. When the corner¬ 
stone of the bank interrupted his 
view, he knew the worst: the precious 
envelope had escaped from between 
the slick pages of the magazine, and 
someone—enterprising and dishonest 
—had snapped it up. 

The envelope had contained fifteen 
hundred dollars. 

The police were notified; so were 
the officials of the bonding company. 
Everyone questioned a white-faced 
and heart-sick Dana. Fifteen hundred 
dollars! He was earning seventy-five 
dollars per month, and saving prac¬ 
tically nothing. If he cut down his 
living expenses to the bone, perhaps 
he could save ten dollars per month. 
That was one hundred and twenty 
dollars per year. 

Thus calculated, it was plain that 
it would require 12 V 2 years to repay 
the loss. Mr. Andrews bowed a 
stricken head. 

After investigation, it was an¬ 
nounced that the loss (never re¬ 
covered, incidentally) was obviously 
accidental and did not involve collu¬ 
sion, misappropriation, theft or mis¬ 
cellaneous hijinks. Dana was exoner¬ 
ated, and the insurance company 
made up the loss. But from that day 
to this, Dana has never carried more 
than $2.17 in cash on his person at 
any time. 

And the next time someone tried to 
filch some company money from him. 
. . . Well, that happened somewhat 
later in the Andrews career, when he 
was working in the office of a cotton 
seed oil company. 

Some of the workmen, after draw¬ 
ing their pay envelopes on Satur¬ 
day, went out on the town to the 
extent of the total receipts. Then, 
rather beerily having added up their 
assets to zero, and having imagined 
the tone of the Little Woman’s voice, 
and the glint of the Little Woman’s 
eye, when they came home heavy with 
excuses instead of earnings, they 
doubled back to the company office. 

One such character, standing six 
feet five and weighing around 260, 
lumbered into Dana’s department with 
a simple demand: “I want you to loan 
me my next week’s pay—right now.” 

There was, luckily, a counter divid¬ 
ing the reception section from the 
desk area. In addition to Dana’s desk 
and those of several other office 
workers who were gone for the day, 
there was a round coal stove and, 
because the time was late summer, 
the empty coal scuttle. 

“Sorry,” said Dana. “You know as 
well as I do that it is absolutely for¬ 
bidden for me to advance one penny 
to you. I’d be fired Monday morning.” 

“I don’t care what happens to you,” 
declared the stimulated citizen, pre¬ 
paring to leap the counter, “I want 
some dough.” 

Dana arose from the desk, grabbed 
the heavy coal scuttle, and equipped 
the workman with a tin bonnet. It was 
very becoming, especially with the 
gentleman stretched out amiably on 
the floor. Dana had no trouble after 
that: the word went around: Don’t 


ONE MOTHER TO ANOTHER 

There were difficulties during the war in supplying 
mothers with a complete variety of prepared bat>y 
foods. Happily, these days of scarcity are almost 
over. Today you will find your dealer’s shelves 
plentifully supplied with the varieties you need* 



When baby looks like this... 

It means food’s on the way —and it better be good! Enjoy 
peace of mind like so many young mothers who, at doc¬ 
tor’s suggestion, serve Gerber's Baby Foods. For Gerber’s 
is made to taste extra good, with uniform, just-right tex¬ 
ture always. The choice vegetables and fruits are carefully 
washed in pure, artesian water, then cooked the Gerber 
way by steam ... to retain precious minerals and vitamins.. 
Every step is laboratory checked. Be sure to get Gerber’s 
— with "America’s Best Known Baby” on the label! 

Baby Cereals, pre-cooked, rich in iron _ 
Serve Gerber’s Cereal Food and Gerber’s Strained Oat¬ 
meal at alternate feedings to give variety, and help baby’s 
appetite. Both cereals are rich in added iron and B-com- 
plex vitamins needed by most babies over three months 
old. Serve by adding milk or formula, hot or cold. 



Remember, it is always wise to check your 
baby's feeding program with your doctor 



Jsiee sample 


Address.. 


erber’s 


FREMONT. MICH. 


OAKLAND. CAL. 


Cereals Strained Foods Chopped Foods 


/ *> kinds of Strained 
Foods, 8 kinds of 
Chopped Foods, 2 
special Baby Cereals. 


) 1046. G. P. C. 


Address: Gerber Products Co., Dept. ML 3-6, Fremont, Mich. 


My baby is now.months 

old; please send me samples of 
Gerber’s Cereal Food and 
Gerber’s Strained Oatmeal. 


Name 


City and State.. 


A9 












70 



D on’t avoid new ideas. Don’t be apa¬ 
thetic. At least, don’t resist a new 
trend until you have investigated it. Take 
the case of Tampax now and look at the 
facts frankly. Wouldn’t you like to be 
free of the monthly pin-and-belt nui¬ 
sance? Of your sanitary deodorant 
troubles? Of the disposal problem? . . . 
Well, all these problems vanish when 
you use Tampax for modern sanitary pro¬ 
tection. 



Accepted for Advertising — 

by the Journal of the American Medical Assoctat/on 


NO BELTS 
NO PINS 
NO PADS 
NO ODOR 


Tampax is scientifically correct for its 
purpose. Perfected by a physician, it is 
daintily small but very absorbent and 
efficient. Only pure surgical cotton goes 
into it and individual patented applica¬ 
tors are provided.... No pins 
or belts. No odor or chafing. 

No ridges or bulges to show 
under sheer clothing. Millions 
of students, business girls, 
housewives, travelers, sports¬ 
women keep Tampax handy in purse or 
desk drawer—takes up very little space. 
Quick to change. Easy to dispose of. 

Sold in drug stores and at notion 
counters. Three absorbencies: Regular, 
Super, Junior. Whole month’s supply 
will go into purse. For 4 months’ supply 
get Economy Box and join the modern 
legion of Tampax users. Tampax Incor¬ 
porated, Palmer, Mass. 

( REGULAR 

3 absorbencies < super 

^ | JUNIOR 


go near the pay roll office on Satur¬ 
day afternoon unless you want to 
make a chump out of The Man In The 
Iron Mask. 

Where did he get the idea that he’d 
like to be an actor? Oh yes, from a 
job he had in high school. He had 
run the local movie projection ma¬ 
chine when “talkies” were so new 
and so expensive that small town 
theatres showed what were called 
“sound” pictures. These “sound” pic¬ 
tures were manufactured by the pro¬ 
jectionist who inserted train whistles, 
automobile honkings, the sound of 
horses hooves and other noises into 
the continuity. Because Dana had to 
watch the screen so closely for clues, 
day in and day out, night in and night 
out, he came to the conclusion that 
anyone who could speak English and 
avoid looking like Gargantua before 
a camera was set as an actor. 

So he resigned from the oil busi¬ 
ness, giving the Farewell Party That 
Made Texas Famous. He rented a hall; 
he hired an orchestra; he bought 
flowers for all the girls, and ice for all 
the boys. As ice is no good alone, he 
bought certain equipment to keep the 
ice from melting entirely of loneli¬ 
ness. It was, indeed, a celebration. 

The next day he counted the dol¬ 
lar bills and silver left in his pockets: 
$10.29. Total. But his wardrobe was 
strictly from Esquire—gabardine suits, 
tweeds, top coats, snap-brimmed hats. 
So was his luggage. He hit the high¬ 
way, cutting arcs through the air with 
his thumb. After three minutes he se¬ 
cured a ride from Uvalde to El Paso. 
Just outside El Paso, a long lowslung 
convertible buzzed past Dana, some¬ 
thing new in the hitch-hiking profes¬ 
sion, slowed down, turned around and 
came back. Said the driver, “Where 
do you want to do?” 

“To Los Angeles,” said the refugee 
from Abercrombie & Fitch. 

“Well. . . . I’m going to Deming, 
New Mexico. I’ll give you a lift that 
far,” said the man under the Stetson. 

He and the driver fell into com¬ 
panionable conversation. Dana told 
something of his background and ex¬ 
perience, and the driver finally con¬ 
fessed that he, too, was going to 
Hollywood. He said that he wrote for 
one of the studios. “Here is a bit of 
advice for you,” he said. “The first 
thing to remember in Hollywood is 
that you’ve got to pay your own way 
all the time. Don’t be a sponge. Don’t 
be a moocher. Live on your own 
dough, and pay your own way.” 

It occurred to Dana that this might 
be a hint from the driver that Dana, 
since he was a gratis passenger, 
should pay for the driver’s meals or 
hotel accommodations. Said Dana, “If 
you mean that I should pay up, mister, 
I can only say that I’d like nothing 
better, but I’m almost flat broke. I’ve 
got about $3.24.” 

“Here—I’ll loan you ten,” said the 
driver. 

“Never mind. I’ll get by,” insisted 
Dana. 

But the driver pressed the ten spot 
on Dana, so Dana finally accepted. 
After that, the driver paid the hotel 
bills before Dana could get to the 
desk, and he picked up the check 
whenever the men stopped for food. 
Dana protested several times, but the 
driver always overruled him. 

They reached Yuma, Arizona, along 
in the middle of the night. It was Jan¬ 
uary and as cold as a polar pump. 
“This is where you get out,” said the 
driver to Dana. 

“I thought you said you were go- 



Dana and wife at the Farmer's Market Party. 


ing to Hollywood,” observed Dana. 

“I am. But I don’t like your atti¬ 
tude. You don’t pay your own way.” 

Dana gulped. “But I’ve explained 
my situation. And, incidentally, I have 
your name and address, and just as 
soon as I get a job I’m going to pay 
you back with the customary interest. 
I haven’t gone into it because I was 
embarrassed, and I thought you’d 
understand. After all, I was hitching 
when you picked me up. Usually 
hitchers aren’t covered with gold.” 

Said the driver, pulling off his right 
boot, “Just to show you that I don’t 
need to be paid back. . . and he 
unrolled a stack of currency taller 
than a farmhouse pile of hotcakes. 

He pulled on his boot. “But I don’t 
like your attitude,” he said. And with 
that he drove away. 

His dust hadn’t settled before Dana 
was picked up by another motorist 
who brought him into Hollywood. 

Things in California were tight, 
very tight. Dana took a job digging 
ditches; he also poured concrete for 
underground improvements. Finally 
he took a job (for $10.00 per week) 
driving a school bus. He was living 
in a back room with a private family, 
paying $4.50 a week for board and 
room, and saving every penny pos¬ 
sible. As soon as he had amassed the 
amount he imagined his host from El 
Paso to Yuma had expended, he went 
to the address given by the man. 

The apartment manager was be¬ 
wildered. There was no tenant by that 
name living in the building then, nor 
had there ever been. 

So Dana bought a suit of clothes 
with the proceeds. 

From the bus driving job, Dana 
went into the filling station business. 
He was adding up the day’s receipts 
one evening, punching an adding ma¬ 
chine and singing, when he became 
aware of the presence of a customer. 

“Been listening to you sing,” said 
the customer. “How would you like 
to make a try at motion pictures?” 

“You’re kidding, of course,” said 
Dana, but he didn’t laugh. 

“I’m not kidding,” said the man. 
“I think I can place you.” 

Which explains how 17 professions 
trained Dana Andrews to be an actor. 
He has just signed a fabulous con¬ 
tract with 20th Century-Fox and Sam 
Goldwyn, which will pay huge 
amounts of money to Mr. Andrews 
and his family of four. 

But if motion pictures ever become 
obsolete, Dana won’t be out of a 
job for more than twenty mintues. 
P. S. Since he has been living in the 
San Fernando Valley, he has taken 
up gardening. His roses are phenom¬ 
enal. 

The ] f ND. 
















WHO’S NEW 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 54) 


the chapel door. She was “commis¬ 
sioned.” 

“I did Christ and the children,” 
she recalled. “It’s still there. Actually, 
it was merely a copy; and after that 
I realized I had no originality. I had 
a feeling for color—but I felt a true 
artist must have ideas. So I made up 
my mind to be an actress.” 

Making up your mind is one thing: 
getting a foothold in a profession is 
another. While at the Royal Academy 
of Dramatic Art in London, Patricia 
enjoyed acting, but discovered that 
throngs of other girls seemed to en¬ 
joy it, too. How would they all get 
jobs? Pat left the academy, and 
was about to tick acting off as a bad 
idea when she was invited to a party. 

Because Patricia spoke French flu¬ 
ently, she was introduced to Edouard 
Cornelion-Molinier, French director, 
also a guest. They discussed plays 
and pictures, and then he asked: 
“Would you like to make a test for a 
French version of a film?” 

Patricia managed an enthusiastic 
assent, and presently she made the 
test not only in French but in English. 
She worries herself thin over tests 
now, but at that time, the idea of a 
test didn’t bother her, probably be¬ 
cause it seemed like an adventure. 
She clicked—and there she was in 
pictures! 

While she was still in school, Pa¬ 
tricia’s parents took her to Switzer¬ 
land on holiday. Among the hotel 
guests was Dr. Murray Laine of 


London, who had picked out his va¬ 
cation spot by sticking a pin into a 
map. The two young people skated 
and ski-ed together. “Having a won¬ 
derful time” was an understatement. 

The doctor knew he was in love, 
but Patricia wanted a career. Even 
when, two years later, he wore down 
her resistance, she said “Yes” with 
the proviso that he wouldn’t interfere 
with her film ambitions. 

“He hasn’t so far,” she confided. 
“He’s very busy in an important pro¬ 
fession and he looks on films as just 
a little nonsense that keeps me oc¬ 
cupied.” 

Their wedding was to have been a 
great occasion. Three hundred invita¬ 
tions had been sent out, six brides¬ 
maids had ordered their dresses and 
discussed hats and flowers, Patricia’s 
wedding gown was being made and 
honeymoon plans were under way, 
when war broke out. Guests show¬ 
ered the bride with regrets, but they 
were off to war. The wedding gown 
wasn’t finished when the wedding day 
arrived, but Patricia became Mrs. 
Murray Laine at a quiet ceremony in 
St. Mark’s Church, London, wearing 
her going-away suit. Naturally there 
was no time for a honeymoon. 

During the first months of the war, 
Patricia was assigned to a factory 
where she assembled parts, but later 
she was released to make a picture. 
Films being considered essential to 
morale, she kept on making them, but 
each month she had to appear before 


a board to get the necessary permis¬ 
sion. 

Acting, according to the young 
actress, isn’t merely a matter of 
technique. “No one can truly imagine 
grief until he’s lost someone he dearly 
loves,” she asserted. “You think you 
can guess how you’d feel, but the 
reality is so dreadfully different! It’s 
the same with love, marriage and 
marriage problems. I think you can 
imagine hunger, cold and physical 
danger; but I know I never imagined 
how war would be until it came. 

“English women took war as a chal¬ 
lenge; they drew together, took over 
the country’s work, made up their 
minds that nothing could defeat them, 
and each one carried her own weight. 
You might lose your family, your 
friends, your home, your fortune, but 
you went on, proudly. You’d have 
expected to be bowed down with 
grief, sick with fear when the planes 
came over, or full of hate and fury 
at those awful robot bombs, but in¬ 
stead you were determined to get it 
over, you were stubborn and proud.” 

Walter Wanger saw the star in 
“Millions Like Us,” and when the ex¬ 
change system was arranged, asked 
for her to play Caroline Dance in 
“Canyon Passage.” Mr. Rank gave 
her one week’s notice, and she was 
off with her travel permit—and one 
small suitcase. 

After six years of rationing, she 
could hardly believe our dining-car 
menus. Meals seemed bountiful and 
good; she couldn’t believe passengers 
on her cross-country train could be in 
earnest when they grumbled that the 
food was hogwash. Arrived at Uni¬ 
versal Studios, she decided that the 
commissary served the finest dishes 



3% Suite S&»fiA in Texas, Louisiana, Illinois and Missouri 


71 
















For a Flawless-Looking 
Complexion, Use 



"x FORMULA 301 


Powder Base and 
Complexion Beautifier 

The Foundation of an Exquisite 
Complexion. Skillfully' conceals 
tiny lines and minor blemishes. 


ASTRINGENT • ANTISEPTIC • PROTECTIVE 

&5“s 8 ,„*£ 39c-$1.00-$1.50 

At all Ten Cent Stores-Trial Sizes 10c and 20c 

MY PREPARATIONS CO., 522 5th Avenue, New York 18 

If unavailable in your locality, order from us. 
10c □ 20c □ 39c □ $1.00 □ $1.50 □ 

(Add 20% tax) Ft 

Name . 

Address...... 

City & State. 



kAftt&se 

LEARN AT HOME 

j Practical nurses are needed in every 
| community . . . doctors rely on them . . . 
| patients appreciate their cheerful, ex- 
- pert care. You can learn practical 
nursing at home in spare time. Course 
endorsed by physicians. 47th yr. Earn 
while learning. High School not re¬ 
quired, Men, women, 18 to 60. Trial plan. Write now! 
CHICAGO SCHOOL OF NURSING 
Dept. 453. 100 East Ohio Street, Chicago ll t III. 

Please send free booklet and 16 sample lesson pages. 

Kam e _ 

City _ State _ Age - 


Relieve TEETHING Pains 



When Baby's Cry 

Rips Off The Roof 
Rab NUM-Z1T On 

That Coming Tooth 

This new, modem formula relieves teething 
pains quickly. Just rub a few drops on sore 
gums. Effective! Non-injurious! No dosing. 
Does not upset baby’s stomach. 

Costs little. Buy it at your drug 
store. 

For trial package, send 10€ to American 
Druggists Syndicate, Dept.A3. 21-09Borden 
Ave., Long Island City, New York. 


NUM-ZIT 

TEETHING LOTION 


72 



she’d ever tasted, and was amazed 
when actors murmured: “Where’s the 
butter? Fish— again? No steaks?” 

A few days after her arrival, she 
was sent to Oregon on location. She 
loved it: the glorious scenery, friendly 
people, wonderful box lunches! “But 
what appalled me was the waste,” she 
confessed. “We’ve skimped so long at 
home. Each day up there we’d receive 
lovely clean, white boxes containing 
delicious foods wrapped in nice, clean 
waxed paper. People poked through 
their boxes, and presently they threw 
away, not only the food they didn’t 
care for, but the boxes! Those beau¬ 
tiful boxes! It was all I could do not 
to gather them up. In England we’d 
have used them for a year.” 

Her shoulder-length brown hair 
rippled as she shook her head. “It’s 
funny how quickly you can get used 
to anything,” she observed, “Now, I’m 
a waster myself!” 

This is Mark Stevens, Joan Fon¬ 
taine’s leading man in “From This 
Day Forward.” He is convinced that 
an actor must have an understanding 
of life, if he is to make an audience 
believe him. 

“Not just the side of life that lovers 
know,” he elaborated, “but how it 
feels to be hungry and frightened, to 
believe that every man’s hand is 
against him. An actor must be sensi¬ 
tive enough to transmit his own deep 
feeling to the screen. You can’t live 
in a glass case and think you can 
make drama real. Don’t get me 
wrong, though—that doesn’t mean 
you can’t portray a killer because 
you’ve never killed anyone. 

“I’d like to do a gangster role,” 
Mark continues, “for a criminal is 
just a bitter man, driven beyond en¬ 
durance. I’ve known bitterness, I’ve 
spent nights on a park bench in the 
rain, I’ve been underpaid and over¬ 
worked—I know how bitter a man 
can feel.” 

Mark is a dreamy-looking youth, 
tall, dark and slender; bitterness has 
left no mark on him. 

Ever since he can remember, Mark 
has been determined to be an actor. 
There were none in his family, al¬ 
though rumor had it that his maternal 
grandmother once had stage ambi¬ 
tions. When Mark was three, his 
mother took him to Folkstone, Eng¬ 
land, to live with his grandparents, 
Captain and Mrs. William Morrison. 
The captain was official ship’s captain 
for the royal family whenever they 
crossed the Channel or put out to sea, 
and the little boy saw gold cuff-links, 
silver cups, engraved platters and so 
on, presents to his grandfather from 
King George V and the then Prince 
of Wales, now Duke of Windsor. 

His mother’s brothers, whom he 
met upon his return to Cleveland, 
Ohio, when he was seven, were all 
successful men. Her sister had mar¬ 
ried an equally successful man in 
Montreal, Canada, and Mrs. Stevens 
joined her there. Five years later, 
Mark had a stepfather, James Cooke, 
who had worked his way up from 
bookkeeper to vice-president, secre¬ 
tary-treasurer and principal stock¬ 
holder of the Railway & Engineering 
Supply Company. 

No one could have been kinder to 
Mark than his stepdad, but the boy 
was frail, small for his age; so much 
success in the family made him feel 
inferior. He was thrown out of one 
school after another for inattention. 
He heard someone say he’d never 
amount to anything, and vowed to 
himself that he’d be famous. When he 


was sixteen, he asked for an audition 
with the Corona Barn Players in Mon¬ 
treal and won a role under the name 
of Steven Richards. 

A year later, he decided to try the 
New York stage. Arrived there, he 
found he had no notion of how to get 
a stage role, he knew nothing about 
agents, and was chased away from 
stage doors. For three days he walked 
the streets, snatching unsatisfactory 
bites at lunch counters, trying for 
jobs he didn’t want, like dishwashing, 
but without success. To help matters, 
it rained most of the time. The third 
night he sat next to a bum on a park 
bench all night. At 3 A.M., a police¬ 
man snarled: “Move on, there!” at 
the bum, but after a look at the 
miserable youngster huddled in his 
soaking wet clothes, the Law made no 
move to dislodge him. Finally, the 
stepdad sent money for Mark to come 
home. 

“I hope that theatrical nonsense is 
knocked out of your head,” observed 
Mr. Cooke, “Come, I’ll give you a 
job in the plant.” 

Mark stood the job for six months, 
and walked away again. He tried to 
enlist when war broke out, even 
traveling to Chicago once to get into 
the Air Force, but an old injury to 
his back caused his rejection. 

On the pretext of visiting relatives 
in Akron, Ohio, Mark again crossed 
the border. Canada permitted no one 
to take more than a small amount of 
money out of the country, and Mark 
was presently without funds. Too 
proud to mention that he didn’t even 
have bus fare, he walked miles to 
apply for a radio station job. He got 
the job at $15 a week, working from 
6 A.M. to 11 P.M. His schedule in¬ 
cluded running the station alone at 
times, writing, producing and acting 
the star part in a radio drama: “Was 
I Right?” Extremely irked by his 
small salary, but determined to gain 
experience, Mark stuck to the job for 
two years. 

On a flying visit to New York he 
met agent Nat Goldstone at a party. 
“You ought to be in pictures,” said 
Mr. Goldstone, as has been said be¬ 
fore—only Mr. Goldstone meant it. 
When Mark came to Hollywood, it 
was Mr. Goldstone who arranged a 
screen test at Warner Brothers for the 
youth. 

“Broke as usual, I was staying at 
Seal Beach when word came,” related 
Mark. “I had just enough money for 
the bus to Long Beach, train to Los 
Angeles and bus to Hollywood. I 
lacked the quarter for the bus to the 
studio, so I walked the dozen miles. 
I was late and practically exhausted, 
my hair was windblown, I couldn’t 
have looked worse; but I got through 
the test and they gave me a contract. 
My agents found out how poverty- 
stricken I was and staked me to a car, 
living expenses, and doctor bills until 
finally I owed them $2500. They were 
wonderful—whenever I hear of kind¬ 
ness, I think of them. I paid them 
back in time; but even when I was 
earning $125 a week, I was so deeply 
in debt that I looked at a quarter 
twice before I spent it on a sundae.” 

That first contract was disappoint¬ 
ing, for so many of Mark’s best scenes 
in “Objective Burma” and “God Is 
My Co-Pilot” were left on the cutting 
room floor. The other side of the 
ledger balanced, however, for it was 
at Warner’s that he met Annelle 
Hayes. When this schoolgirl from 
Texas visited the set one day, Mark 
paid her scant attention. He saw, he 



























Wear Smart Clothes Again 

Give me just 7 days and I’ll prove free of 
cost that I can help you take off 10, 20 
—yes, even 40 or 50 pounds of excess 
weight without resorting to starvation diets 
or drugs. I’ll help you banish a “spare- 
tire” waistline and reduce bulging hips. 

Then I’ll show you 
how to reproportion 
your figure to slender, 
attractive lines. And, 
when you are reduced 
you can. once again, 
wear stylish clothes— 
sizes smaller. Thrill 
your family — amaze 
your friends, keep 
your date book filled. 


WEIGH LESS ... FEEL BETTER 

in a Week ... THIS HEW EASY WAY.... 

SfAWas vS; gjurs 

thrill to noticeable results the first week. Mrs. P. Hawks, of Washington, D. C, has 

\f r r tte R t/ V £, ha i th ? r,‘ a reco , rd onl y one week and have lost 5 pounds. I’m so pleased.” 
Mrs. Betty Blazek of Chicago has written, “In 3 months I lost 40 pounds. Now I weigh 

“ Here ' s my sensa,ic ™' ol,er “ 

Send, fiot 7 TPayi' Tree "Trial 

Don’t send a penny. Simply mail coupon. By return mail, postage prepaid 
I’H send y° u my reducing phonograph record to try in your own home on 
7 days’ FREE trial. Sent in plain wrapper. No obligation. 

EXTRA FREE GIFT for You 

In addition to sending you my reducing record and les- 
son for 7 days’ trial in your own home, I’ll include a 
copy of my amazing booklet, “A Woman’s Birthright.” 

This is my free gift to you and is yours to keep 
forever. Send your request without delay. This offer 
is open only to women over 18 years of age. Address 


SEND 
MAIL 


coupon 


WALLACE, Suite 1009 
154 E. Erie St., Chicago, 11, Ill. 

Please send me free and postpaid the reducing 
record and lesson for 7 days’ FREE TRIAL. 
Also include my free copy of your booklet, “A 
Woman’s Birthright.” This does not obligate 
me in any way. 1 am over 18 years of age. 


WALLACE RECORDS 


Suite 1009 


154 E. Erie St., 


Chicago 11, 111. 


Name 


Address 


City . Zone _ State. 


73 




























Stout 

Women 


Imagine Yourself 



/O ~ Defit. 283 

/one /Vrucmt 752 east market st. 

^ ^ INDIANAPOLIS 17 , IND. 


• LANE BRYANT, Department 283 

I 752 East Market Street, Indianapolis 17, Indiana 

• Please rush me FREE Style Book for stout women. 


j Address . 

| Town ... State . 

[ If you wish to receive also our Style Book 1 I 
for Expectant Mothers, please check here. I_I 


Looking MUCH Slimmer! 


PICTURE yourself 
in a flaftering dress 
that really SLIMS your 
figure! Now you can enjoy 
new grace and charm in 
smartly styled dresses 
and coats, especially 
proportioned to help 
you look more slender. 
Mail coupon below today 
for FREE copy of new 
Style Book containing a 
wide selection in your rire. 

This Brunch-Coat is 
of multi-color Cotton 
Print Cloth, only $3.98. 
Many others S2.00 to 
S16.95. Coats from 
$10.95. Also suits, 
slacks, hats, hosiery, 
shoes, underwear—- 
all priced very low. 

Rush coupon for your 
new FREE Style Book. 

X4 t ' tWSWff M 



Now We Both 
Have Lovely 

/Blonde //air/ 


jmce using inis 

New J 1-Minute Home Shampoo 

Mothers and daughters stay young together 
when sunny golden curls are gloriously 
lovely. That's why Blondex, the special sham¬ 
poo that helps keep light hair from darken¬ 
ing and brightens faded blonde hair, is so 
popular. Blondex makes a rich cleansing 
lather. Instantly removes dingy, dust film that 
makes hair dark. Takes only 11 minutes at 
home. Gives hair new lustrous highlights. 
Safe for children. At 10c, drug or dept, stores. 


says, that she was a nice girl, but he 
intended to avoid all girls until he 
got out of debt. A few days later, 
Annelle came again. As she left the 
studio, Mark passed her in his car 
and offered her a lift home. He meant 
to leave her there forever, but he 
couldn’t. He asked her for a date, to 
see what she’d say, and their date 
was delightful. Annelle went back to 
school; later she returned to do a pic¬ 
ture at RKO, met Mark once more— 
and they were married. 

Parting from Warner’s, Mark im¬ 
mediately was signed by 20th Cen¬ 
tury-Fox who gave him a leading role 
in “Within These Walls” and planned 
good things for his future. Presently, 
RKO borrowed him for the lead op¬ 
posite Joan Fontaine in “From This 
Day Forward.” 

It hasn’t been easy, but Fame is in 
sight. Before very long, the actor’s 
successful relatives will be boasting 
about that brilliant young fellow, 
Mark Stevens. 

Everything has been luck with 
Frances Ramsden, the heart interest 
in Preston Sturges’ new picture. 
Streamlined, tall and dark with long, 
narrow eyes that light up with excite¬ 
ment; a fascinatingly generous mouth, 
she was a Conover model known as 
“Robin” (because that’s an easy name 
to remember), until she came to 
Hollywood two years ago. 

She’d hardly set foot in town before 
a writer friend took her to lunch at 
Paramount’s commissary. There he 
introduced her to Preston Sturges, 
who said: “You’re a good picture 
type. I think you’ll get somewhere. 
Come to see me next week and we’ll 
see.” 

At the time, Frances’ mind was torn 
between marriage and a career, and 
marriage won. She forgot films for a 
year, then met Mr. Sturges again. To 
her surprise, he recognized her and 
suggested an appointment with Para¬ 
mount’s casting director. She went to 
see Mr. Meiklejohn, who suggested a 
screen test, but again she failed to 
go back. 

Six months later, Frances found 
that marriage didn’t work out, and 
got a divorce. She sought an agent, 
tentatively, but nothing happened. 
Some months ago, dining at the 
Players’ Club with the writer friend, 
she looked up into the eyes of Mr. 
Sturges. “Well, well, if it isn’t Miss 
Ramsden, the elusive one!” he cried. 

Frances’ cheeks flamed. She made 
an appointment and surprised them 
both by keeping it. Mr. Sturges had 
exactly the role for her in his new 
production “The Sin of Harold Did- 
dlebock”—and just like that, she was 
in! 

“Mr. Sturges had said he liked my 
type, and he didn’t try to change me,” 
marveled Frances. “My hair is 
combed in a thick bang, just as I’ve 
always worn it; my lipline and brows 
are still natural. I’ve never had a 
lesson, even in dancing. Before each 
scene, Mr. Sturges tells me what he 
wants, and I try to give it to him.” 

The secret of acting, so far as she 
has observed, is correct reaction. She 
sits on the sets, watching the listening 
actors. Anyone can put his all into a 
dramatic speech, she’s sure, but to 
appear to be hearing a line for the 
first time and staying in character is 
the great test! 

Although Michael Dunne, 20th 
Century-Fox’s handsome find, has a 
father who once played with the 
Abbey Players in Ireland, acting was 
not Michael’s first choice. He wanted 


to be a journalist. He edited papers 
at school, and later his ambition was 
heightened when he became radio 
announcer for Raymond Gram Swing 
and the late Raymond Clapper. 

“I’d give my right eye to go where 
you’re going and do what you’ll do,” 
he told Mr. Clapper, the day he signed 
off for him for the last time. Mr. Clap¬ 
per was killed on his mission in the 
Pacific, but Mike still hopes some day 
to be Journalist Dunne. 

When he was in high school in 
Northampton, Massachusetts, the girls 
of Smith College drafted boys for 
their plays; Michael, being tall for 
his teens, became a leading man. 
He’ll never forget the night he played 
the role of Paris in “Helen of Troy.” 
It seems he forgot to make up the 
backs of his legs—the fronts were 
bronzed—and the audience greeted 
his first turning with shrieks of mirth. 

He was studying stenography, typ¬ 
ing and mathematics, under the mis¬ 
taken impression that it would be nice 
to be an accountant, and after gradu¬ 
ation, when he went to New York, 
he took a job as stenographer for the 
General Electric Company. 

“Later I decided to go to college,” 
he recalled, “and enrolled at the Uni¬ 
versity of Alabama to major in drama 
and journalism.” 

Working his way through college, 
Michael became secretary to the head 
of the Psychology Department; this 
job, along with newspaper activities, 
left him barely six hours of sleep a 
night. But that’s the way to profit by 
education, he believes, and is deter¬ 
mined that his children will obtain 
their college degrees this way, too. 

Just before he left for Alabama, he 
met Vivian Belliveau at a dance. Love 
smote him at first sight, but he re¬ 
fused to acknowledge it since he’d 
made up his mind to play the field. 
He tried to be the gay bachelor dur¬ 
ing that first semester, but the fun 
had gone out of it. Home for Christ¬ 
mas, he discovered at another dance 
that Vivian was The Only One. En¬ 
gaged for two years, they married in 
1940 on the strength of a part-time 
radio announcer’s job in Chicago. 

Summer vacations from college had 
been spent in New Hampshire at the 
Maria Ouspenskaya School, and the 
stage began to weave its spell. Michael 
didn’t have the acting bug—then— 
but he had theories about acting and 
enjoyed experimenting. 

After marriage, he advanced in 
radio to a top spot as radio news¬ 
caster and announcer for New York’s 
Station WOR. Radio is hard on the 
nerves, and the constant tension so 
worked on Michael that he was re¬ 
jected from the Armed services once 
we were in the war. This depressed 
him terribly, and all his efforts to 
gain weight and serenity, to prove 
that he was material for Mars, failed. 

During this period, the goodlooking 
Irishman was often approached for 
pictures, but he laughed his offers 
away. They must be kidding! At 
length, a talent scout spoke to his 
radio boss, and that gentleman per¬ 
suaded the overwrought Michael to 
try Hollywood for six months. 20th 
Century-Fox advanced his ticket and 
a contract, and Michael went as a gag. 

To his surprise, he liked pictures. 
He likes them even more after doing 
three roles. You saw him in “Junior 
Miss” and you’ll see him in “Doll 
Face.” In fact, you’re certain to see 
the name of Michael Dunne on movie 
screens for some time to come. 

The End 

















GREAT SCOTT 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 401 




began a ham-on-rye diet varied 
occasionally with two-bit spaghetti 
plates. 

She was saved from complete mal¬ 
nutrition when she landed the role of 
Sadie Thompson in “Rain” at the 52nd 
Street Stock Company Theatre. There 

she impressed-both visually and 

vocally-the producers of Tallulah 

Bankhead’s “Skin Of Our Teeth.” She 
reminded those worthies of their fabu¬ 
lous star, and they wasted little time 
signing her as Tallu!s understudy. 

For seven heart-breaking months 
Lizabeth waited for Fate to sock Miss 
B on her lovely chin, or to delay her 
Long Island train. But the star was 
consistently prompt and healthy; 
finally, Lizabeth just up and quit. 

A brief month later the manager of 
the show phoned her. Gladys George, 
who had replaced Miriam Hopkins, 
who had replaced Bankhead, couldn’t 
go on. Lizabeth, come home; all is 
forgiven! 

That night she took to the boards 
before a hardened Broadway audience 
and so captivated it that even the 
critics smothered their usual yawns 
and joined the applause at third act 
curtain. Lizabeth went on with the 
company and filled out the Boston run 
of the show. The fashion modelling 
she resorted to between engagements 
to vary her starchy diet, eventually 
led to Hollywood. Producer Hal Wal¬ 
lis saw her picture in a magazine, 
waggled a finger at her, and she 
trained west. One listen at that purr- 
of-a-voice and Lizabeth was handed 
a dotted line to sign on. 

Her career is important to her, but 
she has room for other interests. Her 

family, for instance-she dotes on it. 

It’s a family that does strange and 
unpredictable things and it reminds 
her happily of the dizzy entourage in 
“You Can’t Take It With You.” One 

of her favorite relatives is a priest- 

a wonderful and inspiring man to 
whom she lets down her ample back 
hair via correspondence. And there 
is a kid sister who’s attending Ver¬ 
mont Junior College; another who’s 
a student at Western Reserve, and a 
brother who’s a Navy V-12 at Case 
Institute of Applied Science. 

“I never realized,” she says, “how 
much pride people have in their home 
towns until I began making personal 
appearance tours across the country. 
Why, I’ve seen grown men almost 
come to blows over the wonders of 
their respective birthplaces. It’s so 
silly. I’ll always believe that ‘home’ 
is your family-not your town hall. 

“I must have had all the earmarks 
of an adolescent snob when I hit New 
York,” she goes on. “I couldn’t abide 
the ‘cinema.’ The theatre was my life 
and I meant to keep it that way. Then 

one day-back in ’38 or ’39-1 

went to see a movie, “Of Mice And 
Men.” I sat through it twice, com¬ 
pletely spellbound. Then I thought, 
‘No wonder I like this. It’s pure the¬ 
atre. Someday I want to work with 
that director.’ 

“The director was Lewis Milestone, 
and I’m working with him now on 
‘Strange Love.’ He’s teaching me so 
muc h—he’s even begun teaching me 
Russian! I remember hearing my 
grandmother speak that language 
when I was just a kid. When ‘Milly’ 



Girdles 
Brassieres 
All-i 


**-tr 


BRASSIERES W to *1.50 
■ * 

FOUNDATIONS *2.50 to *6.50 

& v - 

Bestform Foundations, Inc. • 64 West 23rd Street, New York 10, N.Y. 



/fair 


Ffain 




stop 

jllSSl ' 1 


^ fott O'*- 






HAIRTAINER* 
grips hair here 


ORDINARY COMB lets 
hair strands slip through. 


.on 


sd ea c0 u^ tetS 

tvodo* 


Mfd. Proo. P.t. No. 2 . 196 , 81 sDIADEM, INC., DEPT.HW-3, LEOMINSTER,MASS. •HAIRTAINER Trode M«r* R«r. O.S.P.t.Off. 


















Before After 

"How I Lost 76 Pounds in 6 Months" 

— as told by Mrs. Betty Woolley, of Port Clinton, Ohio 


“Last summer I weighed 206 pounds, was 
so tired I had to rest every afternoon. 
Today I weigh 130, have a world of en¬ 
ergy, and my appearance is so completely 
changed that friends do not recognize me. 
After wearing size 42 dresses, I now slip 
into a size 14 with ease and confidence. 
My skin and hair show great improve¬ 
ment. In fact, at 28 I look and feel so dif¬ 
ferent that it is almost like starting life 
over. 

“How did it all happen? Well, I had al¬ 
ways been overweight and thought I was 
just naturally fat. But three months after 
my second baby was born, I decided to 
try the DuBarry Success Course. 

“Results began to show surprisingly 
soon. In six weeks I lost 30 pounds. In 
six months I had lost 76 pounds and had 
reduced my bust 11 inches, my waist 13, 
my abdomen 12, my hips 11. Through 
improved posture, I stand an inch taller. 


“To me all this proves what a grand and 
workable plan the DuBarry Success 
Course is. My only regret is that my 
doubts delayed my starting for a whole 
year.” 

HOW ABOUT YOU? Haven’t you 

wished that you might be slender again, 
hear the compliments of friends, look and 
feel like a new person? The DuBarry 
Success Course can help you. It shows 
you how to follow, at home, the methods 
taught by Ann Delafield at the famous 
Richard Hudnut Salon, New York. You 
get an analysis of your needs, a goal to 
work for and a plan for attaining it. You 
learn how to bring your weight and body 
proportions to normal, care for your skin, 
style your hair becomingly, use make-up 
for glamour —look better, feel better, be 
at your best. 

Why not use the coupon to find out 


and the script man began exchanging 
a few Russian words on the set I un¬ 
derstood most of what they said. Now 
they’re making me their star pupil. 

“Milestone is a wonderful man. 
Gentle and patient and wise. He has 
great basic integrity, too. You know 
that if he believes in something he’ll 
fight for it. Too few people are that 
sincere. They talk a good game, but 
they’re too lethargic or complacent to 
want anything hard enough to go out 
and get it. Milestone does. He has 
the courage of his convictions. I ad¬ 
mire him tremendously.” 

Lizabeth has a refreshing approach 
to life; she’s forthright, realistic and 
courageous. A realist in her thinking, 
she follows through with a love of 
realism in painting and ballet. But, 
paradoxically, she knocks on wood 
and she relies on her instincts. She 
admits her memory is abominable. She 
wants to start a Van Gogh collection. 
Color fascinates her and she dotes on 
even violently mediocre Mexican 
paintings. 

She wears simple, superbly-cut 
clothes. A dead-black suit trimmed 
with black braid is a pet. Another is 
a classically unadorned champagne 
crepe gown with dolman sleeves. She 
wears almost no jewelry and has 
nightmares, which her Negro maid in¬ 
terprets for her. Her appetite is end¬ 
less and she spends most of her time 
trying not to eat. She went on a 
week-long liquid diet a while back 
and whittled herself down to nothing. 

Her vocabulary has dictionary scope. 
It is a distinct relief to hear her talk 
for half an hour without a cliche, with 
few word repetitions and with a no¬ 
ticeable lack of Hollywoodisms. 

She lives alone in a small apartment. 
She has no telephone. The absence 
of the jangling bell makes her lonely 
on occasions, but she fills in empty 
moments with dainty tomes like Vol¬ 
taire’s Experiences with the Quakers 
in England. She likes the Thomases 
Mann and Wolfe. Her hobby is a 
glass menagerie (from the play of the 
same name). She is taking driving 
lessons. She swims, rides horseback, 
likes solitude in small doses, and can’t 
abide pub-crawling, club-hopping, or 
whatever you want to call it. 

She has been dubbed “The Threat” 
by the Master Motion Picture Projec¬ 
tionists of Southern California, and 
has been set-up as “The Voice of Al¬ 
lure” by speech expert Bert B. Gott- 
schalk. 

Lizabeth recently made the front 
pages when a thief swiped her last 
pair of Nylons from the clothes-line. 
She is helping her former room-mate, 
Meredith Thomas—bed-ridden for two 
years with a broken back—by arrang¬ 
ing a singing test which will be made 
at the gal’s home in up-state New 
York. She resents people who sell 
Hollywood short. She recently inher¬ 
ited a half interest in a 400-seat movie 
theatre near Croydon, England. 

You can believe her when she says, 
“I’m going to stay here in Hollywood 
and work myself silly. I’m going to 
be a great—I mean a really great 
dramatic actress, or I’m going to die 
in the attempt. I’m not kidding my¬ 
self. _ I know I have a lot to learn. 
I m in the process of learning now. 
1 know I’ll get to the top because I’m 
willing to fight for what I want—fight 
all the way—without stepping on any¬ 
one’s toes. And because I want to do 
my job to the fullest.” 





Accepted tor adeertising in publications 
ol the American Medical Association 


Ann Delafield, Directing 


what this Course can do for vou? 


RICHARD HUDNUT SALON 
NEW YORK 



With your Course, you receive a Chest 
containing a generous supply of DuBarry 
Beauty and Make-up Preparations . 


Richard Hudnut Salon, 

Dept. SC-54,693 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. | 
Please send the booklet telling all about the 
DuBarry Home Success Course. 


,’N\ 


Guaranteed by 
Good Housekeeping 

1 f mtuttieio* 


MlSS 

Mrs— 


Street- 


City- 


JState- 


76 


The End 


















RELATIVELY SPEAKING 

ICONTINUED FROM PAGE 29 ) 


On the set of “Easy Come, Easy Go,” 
two brothers are working: Barry Fitz¬ 
gerald and Arthur Shields. Barry, in 
diving suit and helmet, is being hauled 
up from beneath dark and dirty 
waters by an agitated Arthur, in 
sweater and boots. Arthur is seven 
years younger, eighteen inches taller, 
and his hair, instead of receding in 
a graying film, is very thick and dark. 

Shields is the brothers’ real name. 
Arthur went from school to join the 
Abbey Players as a “regular actor,” 
attending classes at the Abbey School; 
but Barry had a job as clerk in a gov¬ 
ernment office in Dublin, where both 
boys were born, and could devote 
only evenings to his ambition. Since 
no office boss looks with favor on an 
employee’s stage career, Barry de¬ 
cided to call himself Fitzgerald. 

Often in those years, they were cast 
in the same play, sometimes playing 
brothers, now and then father and son. 
Arthur came to America in 1921, his 
tour taking him on to Australia, and 
Barry finally gave up his clerkship for 
the stage. In 1936, they played to¬ 
gether in their first Hollywood pic¬ 
ture, “The Plough and the Stars,” a 
venture that won Barry for films. 
Arthur went back to the stage, return¬ 
ing a few years later to join Barry 
again in “How Green Was My Valley.” 

Between shots on the dock, Arthur 
commented: “I’ve been reading in the 
papers that it’s bad luck having a 
brother in this business. They say one 
brother will succeed and the other 
will get the leavings. It hasn’t been 
so with us. Barry was no better actor 
when he got his Academy Award last 
year than he was when he first came 
here—he’s always been good. It’s fine 
to have a brother in the same line, for 
what one doesn’t hear, the other will, 
and they can exchange news. We’re 
friends, and we don’t play the same 
type of thing. Not having the same 
name may help, too, for I’m told pro¬ 
ducers are inclined not to like a star’s 
relatives. But there’s no doubt it’s 
easier to meet important people if 
they are guests in a brother’s home.” 

When Joan Fontaine began her 
career, sister Olivia de Havilland was 
a star. Refusing to trade on Olivia’s 
bright name, Joan took her step¬ 
father’s and made a start on the stage 
in Hollywood. Joan wouldn’t mention 
their relationship then, but Olivia, 
who was proud of her younger sister, 
would launch into the subject at any 
conversational opening. 

A little later, David Selznick offered 
Joan the role of Melanie in “Gone 
With the Wind.” 

“I’m not the type,” said Joan, hon¬ 
estly, although she was new and 
needed a good role, “why not get 
Olivia? It’s exactly her meat!” and 
Melanie gave Olivia a lift. 

I am assured that the rumors of 
rifts between the sisters are the re¬ 
sult of a not-too-bright idea of a 
publicity man. Not true, not true! 

“Change your name if you’re re¬ 
lated to fame” is a theory with many 
advocates. Take Jeanette MacDon¬ 
ald’s sister, Blossom MacDonald, once 
well known on the New York stage. 
As Marie Blake, she is equally well 
known on the screen today. 

“I was an actress before Jeanette 
grew up,” smiled Marie, “but after she 
had her great success in pictures, I 


ARE IGNORANCE AND FALSE MODESTY 



There comes a time in many married 
women’s lives when their husbands start 
showing an insufferable indifference. And 
yet the wife often has no one but herself 
to blame. False modesty has kept her 
from consulting her Doctor. Or she very 
foolishly has followed old-fashioned and 
wrong advice of friends. 

Too many married women still do not 
realize how important douching often is 
to intimate feminine cleanliness, charm, 
health and marriage happiness. And 
what’s more important—they may not 
know about this newer, scientific method 
of douching with— ZONiTE. 

No other type liquid antiseptic tested is 
SO POWERFUL yet SO HARMLESS 

No well-informed woman would think of 
using weak, homemade solutions of salt, 
soda or vinegar for the douche. These 
do not and can not give the germicidal 
and deodorizing action of zonite. 


No other type liquid antiseptic-germicide 
for the douche of all those tested is so 
powerful yet so safe to delicate tissues. 

zonite positively contains no carbolic 
acid or bichloride of mercury; no creosote. 
zonite is non-poisonous, non-irritating, 
non-burning. Despite its great strength— 
you can use it as directed as often as you 
wish without risk of injury. 

Zonite principle discovered by 
famous Surgeon and Chemist 

zonite actually destroys and removes 
odor-causing waste substances. Helps 
guard against infection. It’s so powerfully 
effective no germs of any kind tested have 
ever been found that it will not kill on 
contact. You know it’s not always pos¬ 
sible to contact all the germs in the tract 
but YOU can be sure that zonite im¬ 
mediately kills every reachable germ and 
keeps them from multiplying. 

Buy zonite today. Any drugstore. 

FREE! 

For frank discussion of intimate 
physical facts—mail this coupon to 
Zonite Products, Dept. ML-36, 370 
Lexington Ave., New York 17, N. Y., 
and receive enlightening free booklet 
edited by several eminent Gynecologists. 

Nome_-_ 

Address__ 

City_Stole-— 


Zomte 

FOR NEWER 

Jemimne /yyiene 



77 















'ffrM' \ 

tlMl POUW 

NNltVl 

«M-COU 


25c 

at cosmetic counters 


SEAL-COTE 

Use Over Your Favorite Polish 


found that her fame held me back. 
I’d go to see a producer, looking for 
a job, and all he could think of was to 
try to persuade me to get Jeanette to 
do a show for him. Nobody wanted 
to discuss a role for me. At length, 
I consulted a numerologist and paid 
her $5 to rechristen me. That did it!” 

K. T. Stevens, daughter of Producer 
Sam Wood, found that “Gloria 
Wood,” her own name, was a distinct 
handicap. It was easy for Gloria to 
get in to see important people, but 
once in, producers and directors were 
apt to laugh and say: “Now, what 
makes you think you want to act? 
You have plenty of money, why not 
just play around until you find a nice 
young man?” They wouldn’t take 
Gloria and her ambitions seriously. 

Equipped with a new and cryptic 
name, her calls became more produc¬ 
tive. She got a good stage role, fine 
notices, judged by personality and 
ability, and began her climb before 
her true identity was known. 

Maureen O’Hara’s young sister, 
Florrie, hopes to launch a Hollywood 
career after the birth of her expected 
baby. As “Claire Hamilton,” Florrie 
made a picture in England; she’d had 
a taste for acting ever since, as a little 
girl, sister Maureen used to direct her 
in home theatricals, and she hopes to. 
follow in her sister’s footsteps here. 
It’s a great advantage, says Florrie, 
to have a star in the family. Maureen 
introduced her to her own agent and 
so gave her a chance to get a test. 
Rumors are that there’s a contract in 
the offing as soon as the heir arrives. 

Cleo Morgan, now working in 
“Time for Two” at MGM, Lucille 
Ball’s starring picture, is actually Lu¬ 
cille’s sister. She’s married to Ken¬ 
neth Morgan. She carefully guarded 
the secret of her relationship to the 
star until an interviewer charged her 
with it. “You mustn’t tell anyone,” 
she begged. But he did. 

“Oh Lucille, is it all right?” she 
cried, when the item appeared. 

“Ail right?” echoed Lucille, “You 
crazy kid, it’s wonderful!” The star 
adores Cleo, and hopes their relation¬ 
ship will be a help and not a hin¬ 
drance to the newcomer. 

Loretta Young’s sisters, who were 
on the screen before she was, ulti¬ 
mately found themselves handicapped 
by her fame, according to their 
mother. All three girls could play the 
same kind of role, and when the 
youngest of them began her rise, she 
was always chosen ahead of Sally and 
Polly. They retired into matrimony 
and wouldn’t go back to the screen if 
they could, but there were early 
heart-burnings, not at all the fault 
of Loretta, of course. 

Katherine Grayson’s sister and 
brother, both stage-struck, decided 
they wouldn’t trade on Katherine’s 
name and fame. The sister became 
Frances Raeburn and made her screen 
debut as one of the “7 Sisters” with 
Katherine. No one knew they were 
actually sisters until after the film 
was previewed. The brother is known 
as Michael Butler. He has done some 
small parts on the screen, some fine 
roles in radio, and is now headed for 
New York and musical comedy. 

When Joan Leslie got her Warner 
Brothers’ contract, she was well under 
age and, according to law, could work 
only half a day before the cameras. 
Her sister, Mary Brodell, had passed 
her 18th birthday and looked so much 
like Joan that she could pass for her 
at a distance. In long shots in Joan’s 


RADIO 

GIRL 

An exotic, tantalizing 
fragrance ... so full of 
mystery and loveliness 
... So truly different, so 
inviting to romance 
Radio Girl Perfume 
lingers like a haunting 
melody 

\10£-25C at beauty^ 

COUNTERS EVERYWHERE 





Margot FitzSimons expects to join her sister, 
Maureen O'Hara, after her film debut in the 
J. Arthur Rank film "I Know Where I'm Going." 


early pictures, the girl you see is 
really Mary. Joan worked only in 
close-ups. This experience may have 
soured Mary on a career of her own, 
for she’s never been near a studio 
since her marriage. The second sister, 
Betty Brodell, has a Warner contract, 
too, and is slowly coming up. Joan, 
asserts Betty, was never a handicap 
—instead she was the key that un¬ 
locked the studio gates! 

A famous brother team includes 
George Sanders and Tom Conway, 
both born “Sanders” in St. Peters¬ 
burg, Russia, sons of a British manu¬ 
facturer and a Russian mother, and 
British citizens under protection of 
the British Embassy. 

When Tom was 13 and George 11, 
the family fled to England to escape 
the revolution. Following his gradu¬ 
ation, Tom went to Africa to try his 
hand at mining and ranching, but 
malaria cut short these ambitions, and 
he became a glass salesman in Lon¬ 
don. One day he tried to sell an order 
to a man who was preoccupied with 
the casting of a Little Theater play. 

“You’d be wonderful in my play,” 
he kept saying, ignoring Tom’s in¬ 
sistence that he, after all, was selling 
glass. In the end, they made a bar¬ 
gain: The man would buy Tom’s 
quota of glass if Tom would take part 
in the play. Tom discovered that he 
liked acting and joined a repertory 
company. 

About this time, George became an 
actor, too. Both boys did radio work 
between shows, and their voices were 
so alike they were always getting con¬ 
fused—no one could remember which 
Sanders had played which role. 

“One of us must change his name,” 
declared George. “Let’s toss a coin.” 

Tom lost the toss and became Con¬ 
way. Shortly afterward, George 
came to Hollywood. He kept urging 
Tom to follow him, but it was 1939 
before a lull in show business gave 
Tom the opportunity to do so. 

It was a help to find George well 
established, for he could advise his 
brother and introduce him to the right 
people. After a two-year contract at 
MGM, George was once again a help 
to Tom, for the younger brother was 
fed to the teeth with “Falcon” roles 


78 











and suggested that Tom take the 
series over. Which he did, very suc¬ 
cessfully. 

When Noah Beery, junior, was a 
child, both his father and uncle Wal¬ 
lace were famous screen actors. 
“Pidge,” as they called the boy, used 
to go on location where he learned to 
ride, rope calves and shoot at targets. 
He made friends with the Indians in 
the films and used to make small clay 
models of them in action. He wanted 
to be an artist, perhaps a sculptor, and 
was sure he’d never be an actor. 

When he left school, he fell in love 
with Maxine Jones, daughter of Buck 
Jones, also a Western star. You can’t 
keep a wife on a young artist’s pros¬ 
pects, so Pidge accepted an offer of 
a film role and discovered to his sur¬ 
prise that he liked it. Now he’s a 
star, too. 

Then, of course, there are the Ben¬ 
nett sisters, Constance and Joan, who 
manage to continue starring year after 
year. The fame of father Richard 
Bennett gave them an initial impulse, 
no doubt, but they carried on for 
themselves. 

Father’s fame turned out to be a 
detriment to Diana Barrymore. Her 
great name so dazzled producers that 
she was given stellar roles and billing 
before she was ready for them. Diana 
was unfamiliar with the screen; 
people who might have advised her 
felt diffident about doing so because 
of her acting heritage; and when her 
first picture was released, the young 
star was overwhelmed by bad notices. 

Ida and Rita Lupino, daughters of 
an equally famous and even older 
family of actors, feel their name and 
traditions have been of inestimable 
help. 

“Being related to Ida could never 
be a handicap,” says Rita, “We don’t 
do the same type of thing, so we could 
never be rivals for a role. Any time 
the name ‘Lupino’ is mentioned, it 
helps us both'. We’ve made Decca 
records and often do radio shows to¬ 
gether. I can see that there could 
be conflict between sisters if both 
compete for the same part.” Rita 
and her husband, Enrique Valedez, 
appear as a dancing team in “Mas¬ 
querade in Mexico.” 



Tom Conway inherited brother George 
Sanders' "Falcon" roles because of resem¬ 
blance. 



0ailHvU Si&ZM 

M HAIR PREPARATION S 

At better dep’t., drug stores 
Free hair-care booklet. . . write 

DEPT H- 3 • OGILVIE SISTERS. 404 FTft 


DISCOVERED! 


{IMao, m unr riUMj'i 


I 


Ogilvie Sisters’ specialized hair beauty-aids will reveal a treasure-trove 

of highlights hidden in your hair. It's easy to keep your hair radiant, 
easy-to-manage . . . the "professional" way—at home! 


HIGHLIGHTS HAIRINSE 1.00* 

Special Preparation . . . for 
Cleansing and Loose dandruff 
CREME-SET ... 

for quick-grooming lustre 1.25 % 


* subject to Fed. Tax 


COMPLETE CANDID CAMERA OUTFIT 


0&& U */ * ^ n ^^^ n U H c°a T m°e C r R a AFT 

★ CARRYING CASE with 
Your Name in 23-Kt. GOLD 

★ 3 ROLLS of No. 127 FILM 





98 

POST 

PAID 


LOOK AT THESE FEATURES 

* Genuine Simpson Ground ind Pitch Polished Lens 

★ Takes 16 Pictures on Any Standard No. 127 Film 

★ Will Take Pictures in Full Coler 

♦ Has “Bullseye” Level View Finder 

* Easy, Simple, Foolproof Operation 

PICTURES YOU TAKE TODAY 
WITH THIS BIG 3-IN-1 OUTFIT 
WILL BE THE TREASURES OF TOMORROW 

... For while time stands still for no one, the memories 
of happy times can be preserved by Photocraft. Your 
Photocraft candid camera outfit comes to you ready to 
go to work—with a handy shoulder strap carrying case 
Personalized with the name of your choice in 2J-Kt. 
GOLD, and enough film for 48 exposures—for only 
£}.98 postpaid! Your Photocraft will also take full color 
pictures when loaded with Colorchrome film. So wheth¬ 
er for a gift or for yourself, order your Photocraft 
now! Our guarantee is your assurance of satisfaction. 


Sold en a “Examine At Our Risk” 
GVARAHTEE OF SATISFACTIOH 

Yes, if you don’t feel that Photocrafc 
is everything you expected, you may re¬ 
turn it in 10 days for complete refund. 



WITH YOUR NAME 

in 23-Kt. GOLD 


IMPERIAL INDUSTRIES—Dept. PC2II 
618 South Dearborn St., Chicago 5, III. 

Rush my Photocrafc Candid Camera Outfit at with 

Personalized Carrying Case and 3 rolls of No. 127 Film. 
My money will be refunded if returned in 10 days. 

Name Wanted In Gold_- 

CHICK ONE 

0 I'm enclosing $3.98 in full payment. Please send my 
Photocraft Outfit Postpaid. 

0 Send my Photocraft C.O.D. I am enclosing $1.00 de¬ 
posit because I want my Carrying Case Personalized in 
GOLD. Ill ^>ay postman balance of $2.98 plus postage. 
0 Send my Photocraft C.O.D. without name on Carrying 
Case. I will pay postman $3.98 plus postage. 

Name--- 


RUSH THIS COUPON FOR CAMERA OUTFIT 


1 Address- 

City— 


79 


















































f 


80 


IKiWa 


TO LIGHT UP YOUR 
LOVELINESS 



Tic 

0naAc-2^> 


•VAv. OMmu* 


iPSEI, 

/UcvacfA 

Your secret of bewitching charm — that 
radiant dream - exciting glow upon your 
face! Only a few drops of Anatole Rob¬ 
bins Prismatic Make-up will turn you into 
a star for all occasions. 

It covers blemishes, , *!■« 

' (tor average skins) 

never cakes on your WHITE CAMfUIA . 3 50 

face, and comes in (for average skins) 

many exquisite shades DRESDEN ..... 7.50 

to give you everlast- mOW?. 

mg loveliness from (for oily skins) 

dawn till dusk. Plus 20 % tax 

At better stores, or write 

ANATOLE ROBBINS 

5229 Hollywood Blvd. • Hollywood 27, Calif. 


BLUE-JAY with Nupercaine gives 
Amazing 3-Way RELIEF from 

CORNS! 


1 EXCLUSIVE with Blue-Jay, 
anesthetic Nupercaine soon 
curbs surface pain. 

O INSTANTLY stops shoe-pres¬ 
sure pain. 

Q GENTLE medication to loos- 
** en hard “core,” simply lift 
it out in a few days. 

Only Blue-Jay Has NUPERCAINE 

Not single action, not double action, but TRIPLE 
relief with this NEW KIND of corn plaster! 

all drug or toilet goods counters. 

2 Sizes—Standard and Little Toe 
A product of 

■Ill'll III! 11 !■ 

ision of The Kendall Company, Chicago 16 




HEY, MOM! Don’t be a Diaper Drudge! 
Dennison Diaper Liners reduce unpleasant¬ 
ness in changing and washing my diapers. 
Just fold a Liner inside diaper. When soiled, 
flush away. No hard scrubbing. Sanitary. 
Helps prevent diaper rash Costs only a few 
cents a day. Babypads- 200 for $1. Downee- 
soft :,200 for 69t. 

BT FREE.. . To get one full day's supply 
of Diaper .Liners write: Dennison, Dept. 

C-96, Framingham, Mass. 


m y 



JA/WWl&OW 
DIAPER LINERS 

Wherever Baby Goods Are Sold 


Rita’s sentiments are echoed by- 
Dorothy Gish, now in “Centenniai 
Summer,” who began work at the 
same time as her sister Lillian when 
Mary Pickford introduced the pair to 
David Wark Griffith, years ago. Lil¬ 
lian is now working in “Duel in the 
Sun,” and the two careers flourish as 
happily now as they did ’way back 
when. 

“Having a sister is wonderful, 
simply wonderful!” cries Dorothy, 
“I’m sorry for girls without one. We’ve 
always been so close, we couldn’t be 
jealous. Fortunately, we don’t do the 
same type of role, but if we did, I’m 
sure Lillian would never try for a 
part she thought I wanted, and I know 
I’d retire if I heard she was after a 
role.” 

The Gish idea works for the Dowl¬ 
ing Sisters. Constance and Doris 
share an apartment, and even at times 
share hats, gloves or bags. When 
Connie is working, Doris holds script 
for her, comes to the set to watch 
her scenes and “mother” her between 
takes. While Doris was doing her 
stuff in “Lost Week End,” Connie re¬ 
turned the “mothering.” She was on 
the set whenever Doris was there, re¬ 
hearsing her lines, whispering hints 
and running errands. As they are 
under contract to different studios, 
they think there’s not much chance 
of handicapping one another. 

“My sister Marian had the right 
idea,” Betty Hutton told me a year or 
two ago. “She got married and has 
a baby. Now she’s settling down 
in a home of her own. She’s the bright 
one—she has everything that matters! 
What have I got, with all this Holly¬ 
wood how-de-do? A nervous break¬ 
down—that’s what!” 

Now Betty.is married, and Marian’s 
husband manages Betty’s husband’s 
business. Marian has stepped out of 
the “home of her own” to sing again 
in night clubs and work in a few pic¬ 
tures, and Betty’s long-term contract 
keeps her in pictures. 

Speaking of sisters, Betty Caulfield, ' 
who replaced Joan in the New York 
production of “Kiss and Tell,” came 
to Hollywood to visit Joan. Betty 
was promptly offered a screen test, 
which she just as promptly refused 
to accept. 

“I couldn’t take it, because Joan is 
my sister,” sighed Betty, “I must get 
more experience before I’ll dare to try 
the screen. You see, if I fail, I’ll let 
Joan down. If I was on my own, it 
would be different.” 

Ottilie Kruger found that having 
Otto Kruger as father smoothed her 
way. He began to train her as an 
actress when she was seven years old, 
and neither she nor her parents ever 
thought of any other career for her. 
Through Otto, Ottilie gained her first 
audition, for which he prepared her. 
“He can take the bows for my success, 
if I have any,” she assures me, “If I 
fail, however, there is no one to blame 
but myself.” 

“A famous father can be a handi¬ 
cap,” confides Andy McLaglen. “I’m 
interested in the technical end of the 
film business, but the minute a pro¬ 
ducer hears my name he says: “Oh, 
no, you should be an actor!’ I was 
acting all the time until I went out to 
Republic Studios on my own and 
managed to land a job as technician 
before they remembered my father’s 
name is Victor. I was an old hand at 
the studio when father signed a con¬ 
tract there!” 

The End 


CHANGE OF FACE 

ICONTINUED FROM PAGE 361 


Now, as Georges Lanlaire in “The 
Diary of a Chambermaid,” (for which 
Ben Bogeaus borrowed Hatfield from 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer) Hurd por¬ 
trays a romantic youth of 19th Cen¬ 
tury France, who has to cope with ill 
health and a domineering mother 
(Judith Anderson); groping desper¬ 
ately for happiness, he finally wins it 
in the shapely form of Paulette God¬ 
dard. These are things everybody 
understands, and it’s a pleasure to see 
this gifted young actor at last behav¬ 
ing like a human being on the screen. 

Nobody was happier over the 
change than Hurd himself. Not that 
he’s had any complaints about the 
other roles, but he likes variety. 

“It’s been a wonderful experience,” 
he declared, just after shooting was 
completed. “The story of ‘Diary’ has 
absolutely everything: adventure, 
tragedy, romance, conflict. There are 
a great many love scenes in it, some 
very tender, some very passionate, 
and of course all very French. It’s the 
first time I’ve ever played a lover. I 
always did character parts in the 
theater. 

"And it’s been a grand experience 
working with Paulette,” he went on. 
“I had never even met her before, and 
right after we were introduced on the 
set, we had to go into a love scene. 
That was a little difficult, as you can 
imagine. But Paulette was so nice I 
soon got oyer my nervousness. She 
hasn’t a trace of the pettiness or 
jealousy about closeups and footage 
that you hear about in connection 
with some feminine stars. Whatever 
will improve a scene or the picture 
as a whole, is what she’s for. All 
through the picture she gave me 
every benefit and opportunity. I can’t 
imagine anyone being nicer than 
Paulette, and I hope I’ll have a chance 
to make another picture with her. 
She told me she’d like to see me do 
comedy, and said also that she’d like 
to do ‘The Guardsman’ with me. I 
wish that would happen. Metro owns 
the story. 

“There was a wonderful spirit 
among the cast and crew all through 
the shooting of ‘Diary’ which made it 
more like play than work. Burgess 
Meredith and Francis Lederer are 
wonderful to work with. We all be¬ 
came good friends. And Judith An¬ 
derson was lots of fun.” 

Shades of Mrs. Danvers! “Judith 
Anderson fun?” someone exclaimed 
“Yes, she is,” he insisted. “I was 
surprised, too. She entered right into 
^he spirit of things, and was always 
adding to the fun. 

“There was never any sense of 
strain in our work, which is largely 
due to Jean Renoir, the director. He 
comes on the set with a great sense 
of freedom which affects everybody 
so that there’s always a feeling of 
relaxation and ease.” 

As this friendly, enthusiastic 
young man talks, you keep thinking 
that the contrast between his three 
screen roles is a mere “bag o’ shells” 
as compared with the contrast they 
all offer to Hurd Hatfield himself. If 
your idea of him has been colored at 
all by the sinister overtones of “Dori¬ 
an Gray,” you’d be in for a slight 
shock and a decidedly pleasant one 
—on meeting him. Then, for the first 
time, do you fully realize what a ter- 























rific acting job he turned in as Dorian. 
There is about as much resemblance 
between the mask-like indifference 
of that character and this gracious 
young man with the healthy tan and 
ready laugh as there is between 
Mortimer Snerd and a Quiz Kid! 

Georges Lanlaire (in “Diary”), in 
spite of being the most life-like per¬ 
son Hurd has portrayed on the screen, 
is also a far cry from Hurd Hatfield. 
There is none of the tragic frustration 
and low vitality of Georges in off¬ 
screen Hurd. He fairly radiates health 
and goodwill and joie de vivre. 

This comes partly from having been 
born into fortunate circumstances and 
brought up with the advantages of 
cultivated living and education. En- 

f countering no parental opposition 
when he decided to become an actor, 
he has been able to pursue his career 
free from the emotional and financial 
struggle that so often makes progress 
difficult. He’s an intelligent, clear- 
thinking young man who is thorough¬ 
ly appreciative of his own good 
fortune without being smug about it. 
He knows many are not so lucky, and 
has a quick sympathy for the prob¬ 
lems of others. 

“I’m never unhappy, and I’m never 
bored,” he says, “because I like peo¬ 
ple, and I find them unfailingly in¬ 
teresting. I enjoy parties and dancing; 
in fact, so much so that I have to 
watch myself or I go overboard. But 
I don’t go out much when I’m work¬ 
ing; that’s probably why some people 
have the idea that I’m a recluse, or 
a snob, or trying to pull a Garbo, or 
something. It’s just that for me, par¬ 
ties and work don’t mix. It takes a 
good deal of energy and concentra¬ 
tion to do your work right, and I’m 
too tired at night to go out. Besides, 
I really think that with these fan¬ 
tastic sums they pay you for your 
work here, you have to keep yourself 
in condition for it.” 

In spite of persistent romantic 
rumors about him (you know how 
Hollywood loves to marry off attrac¬ 
tive bachelors), Hurd insists he’s 
heart-whole and fancy free. He’s seen 
about with various beauties, most 
frequently with Virginia Hunter, 
who’s also under contract to Metro. 
But they both insist it’s a beautiful 
friendship and no engagement. 

Hurd likes Hollywood—but with 
reservations. As he puts it, many 
facets of Hollywood life leave him 
cold, and one thing he dislikes is the 
tendency to talk shop all the time, a 
charge that has frequently been made 
and always admitted. “I suppose,” he 
explains, “it’s just that I’m an east¬ 
erner, and I don’t feel that I’d ever 
be completely at home here. I’d con¬ 
sider it an ideal arrangement if I 
could divide my time between pic¬ 
tures and the stage, going back for a 
play about every two years.” 

Meantime he’s very happy in his 
work, and thinks there are many 
wonderful people here. Some of the 
most interesting to him are the tech¬ 
nicians that work on the sets. “They’re 
the real people,” he says, and tells 
about the crew on “Dorian Gray” 
making him a replica of the cat which 
figured so prominently all through 
the picture. “They told me to take it 
home and it would keep evil spirits 
away. Frankly, I wasn’t so sure about 
that, but I was pleased at their 
thoughtfulness. I took the cat home, 
and I have it on a table in my front 
window.” 

There’s a delightfully humorous 
slant in all Hurd's conversation. He 


LIFE INSURANCE 

(kftt&cti iQ a UteeA 


BUDGET PLAN offered BY MAIL 


GENEROUS BENEFITS! 

BUDGET-PLAN 
Life Insurance Provides: 

DEATH BENEFITS 

for Death from Sickness or 
Natural Causes 

DOUBLE INDEMNITY 

Double Benefits for 
Accidental Death 

EXTENDED INSURANCE 

If you can’t keep up Policy, 
protection continues for 
a liberal period 

CASH VALUE 

If you want to turn in Policy 

TOTAL DISABILITY 

and other generous Benefits. 


• Now, every man, woman and child can afford re¬ 
liable LIFE INSURANCE backed by Legal Reserves! 
No need to be without protection! BUDGET-PLAN 
permits you to decide how much insurance you want 
Over 21 Billion Dollars budgeted insurance 
now in force proves its tremendous value! 

PAY AS YOU GO! 

Pay as little as 5c a week if you wish! 10c pays dou¬ 
ble benefits; 15c pays triple benefits, etc. So easy on 
the pocketbook, so easy to own, all members of the 
family should have their own individual policy. 

NO MEDICAL EXAMINATION 

No Red Tape—No Agent will call—No Collectors. 


FREE COUPON rj'L'l! 


FREE INSPECTION 


Pioneer Life Insurance Co., 


• Examine this amazing Policy without fail. I 1158 Insurance Exch. Bldg., Rockford. 


Send coupon for complete FREE details and 
21-day FREE INSPECTION offer. No obli¬ 
gation. Don’t delay! Be sure to mail it today! 


SEND NO MONEY! 


PIONEER LIFE INSURANCE CO. | 

1158 Insurance Exch. Bldg.. Rockford. III. 


III. 


Please send me Free details about Budget- 
Plan Life Insurance and Free Inspection offer. 


Name .. 
Address 


j^City. 


. State. 




ENLARGEMENT 

acquainted, we will beautifully enlarge your favorite snap¬ 
shot. photo. Kodak picture, print or negative to 5x7 
inches, if you enclose this ad with a 3c stamp for return 
mailing. Please include color of hair and eyes and get 
our new Bargain Offer giving you your choice of handsome 
frames with a second enlargement beautifully hand tinted 
m natural lifelike colors and sent on approval. Your orig¬ 
inal returned with your enlargement. Send today. 

DEAN STUDIOS. Dept. 1465. 211 W. 7th St.. Des Moines. Iowa 


MARCH PAGEANT gives you a complete 
progrom to make you look and feel 
younger, to give you more energy, to help 
you lose extra weight—in only 15 days. 
It’s yours—in March PAGEANT. 

DIVORCEES' HOME ... how a New 

York woman provides a unique way to 
mend broken hearts caused by broken 
families. Pictures of how the experiment 
works, together with a full explanation of 
the results achieved. 

CINDERELLA IN TRIPLICATE . . . 

the rags to riches story of the Andrews 
Sisters whose income today exceeds $400,- 
000 a year. This story of small-town 
warblers who became big-time entertain¬ 
ers is packed with the romance of achieve¬ 
ment. 

PAINLESS CHILDBIRTH WITHOUT 
ANESTHESIA . . . the startling discovery 
made by a foremost English obstetrician 
that an expectant mother's fear often 
hinders the normal process of childbirth. 
Here's a challenging feature every woman 
will want to read today! 


Read March 

PAGEANT 


America's most exciting magazine 
At your newsstand.25c 


81 




























Hair Rinse 

Gives a Tiny Tint 

cuid. . . 

Removes 

m 

du 
fill 


1. Does not harm, permanently 
tint or bleach the hair. 

2 . Used after shampooing — your 
hair is not dry, unruly. 

3 . Instantly gives the soft, lovely 
effect obtained from tedious, 
vigorous brushings . . . plus a 
tiny tint—in these 12 shades. 

1. Black 7. Titian Blonde 

2. Dark Copper 8. Golden Blonde 

3. Sable Brown 9. Topaz Blonde 

4. Golden Brown 10. Dark Auburn 

5. Nut Brown 11. Light Auburn 

S. Silver 12. Lustre Glint 

4. The improved Golden. Glint 
contains only safe certified 
colors and pure Radien, all 
new, approved ingredients. 

Try Golden Glint...Over 50 million 
packages have been sold...Choose 
your shade at any cosmetic dealer. 
Price 10 and 25<i — or send for a 

— FREE SAMPLE — 

GOLDEN GLINT CO. 

Seattle 14 , Wash. Box 3366-C-ll 

Please send color No._as listed above. 


Address. 


GOLDEN GLINT 



^ Atcddi 4 


IIMEA 

PERFUME 


$3.50 UP 

(plus fax) 


FOR SALE IN GIFT SHOPS, DRUG AND DEPARTMENT STORES 


Lovers of the unusual will thrill to Linnea... 
the perfume that captures the dawn-freshness 
of Scandinavian woodlands. It brings you the 
same delicate scent that so entranced Karl von 
Linne, world’s greatest naturalist, who dis¬ 
covered and named the lovely Linnea flower. 

So that you may learn its enchantment, 
we have prepared a special "get acquainted” 
package of Linnea Perfume — not sold in any 
store — this will be sent you prepaid for just 
25c together with the coupon below. Order 
several for yourself and friends! 


Please send - "Get Acquainted ” Packages, prepaid. 

Name ___ 


Address _._ 

Enclosed find $ _ 

LINNEA PERFUMES, INC. 

200 West Ohio Street Dept. 283 Chicago 10, Illinois 


never pokes fun at people, but he gets 
a lot of fun out of them—there’s a 
difference. He talks rapidly and with 
enthusiasm, but not the kind that 
exhausts listeners. His enthusiasm 
sparks the minds of his companions, 
so that ideas are soon flying thick and 
fast, to the benefit and pleasure of all 
concerned. Unlike many good talkers, 
Hurd is not a monologuist. He’s in¬ 
tensely interested in other people’s 
reactions and ideas, and his presence 
is likely to stimulate conversation in 
a group, with an equal chance for 
everybody to speak up. (If you’ve 
ever noticed, that’s rather a rare gift 
in these Hollywoods—or in any 
woods. A good talker usually wants 
an audience, rather than co-talkers.) 
And best of all, his entire outlook 
reveals a genuine kindliness and tol¬ 
erance that is seldom acquired by 
anyone under 96 in this vale of tears! 

The business of being a celebrity 
not only amazes but delights him. “It 
tickles me to death,” he says, with 
engaging frankness. “It’s all I can do 
to keep up a dignified front while I’m 
out on display, as it were, and I think 
it’s incredibly nice of the fans to be so 
interested in me.” 

Even the more extreme antics of 
some of the over-enthusiastic bobby- 
soxers, Hurd thinks, should not be 
criticized too harshly. Hero worship 
is natural at that age; it’s a phase 
nearly everybody has gone through. 
He remembers when he himself would 
have gone to practically any lengths 
for just one personal word from Ethel 
Barrymore. 

He does think the kids today go a 
little far some times, but he’s always 
found them good-natured and ready 
to take suggestions, and thinks it’s 
fairly easy to curb their exuberance 
when necessary. As for instance, the 
time when in New York the young¬ 
sters surrounded him on the street to 
get autographs, and mauled him 
around for about an hour. 

“Some of the kids were ccming 
back for two or three extra auto¬ 
graphs,” explained Hurd. “It seems 
they trade them. And others weren’t 
getting any. Everything was getting 
very confused. Well, I once taught 
school and it comes in handy some¬ 
times. So I said in a loud, firm voice, 
‘Children! We’re going to line up now, 
and everybody will get an autograph. 
Everybody in line now!’ And it 
worked. 

Some subjects Hurd Hatfield is very 
serious about, and one of them is his 
chosen profession. 

“I don’t think of acting as an es¬ 
cape,” he says. “To me, acting is a 
deepening of understanding of things 
foreign to myself. I like to play roles 
that are widely different from my 
own nature. Nothing could be more 
deadly than just being myself all the 
time. That’s why I have a horror of 
being typed. Any role at all appeals 
to me, just so it’s unusual or exciting, 
something new, and different from the 
others. 

“Acting is a tremendously difficult 
craft,” he continued. “It requires a 
great deal more than just the ability 
to be ‘natural’ in front of a camera, 
as so many people seem to think. The 
camera is a very penetrating instru¬ 
ment—almost mystical. It sees your 
thoughts, so you have to act much 
more inwardly and truly before it 
than you do on the stage. If you don’t 
concentrate on what you, as that 
character, are supposed to be think¬ 
ing, or if you allow yourself to an¬ 
ticipate something that you, as the 


character, are not supposed to know 
is going to happen, the camera will 
give you away instantly.” 

After majoring in drama at Colum¬ 
bia University, Hurd was fortunate 
enough to be chosen for a scholarship 
to study in England under Michael 
Chekhov (who in younger days was 
a celebrated star of the Russian 
stage, and is, incidentally, a nephew 
of the great writer, Anton Chekhov). 
The students lived in a castle once 
occupied by Richard II, and for five 
years were given the most thorough 
and grueling training in all phases of 
dramatic work and related subjects. 
Exhaustive as the course was, Hurd 
considers it only a drop in the bucket 
compared to what there is to be 
learned. But the training was in¬ 
valuable, and now that Chekhov is 
living in California, Hurd is able to 
continue studying with him in an 
unofficial sort of way. 

“I always talk to him about my 
roles, and he helps me work out my 
interpretations. It’s tremendously 
helpful to have somebody like that to 
talk over problems with. Chekhov 
has just finished an acting role in 
‘Spellbound’, and there is a great deal 
of interest in him here. Many people 
are hoping he will produce some 
plays. Ingrid Bergman is one who 
wants to do a play with him. Several 
of the cast in ‘Diary of a Chamber¬ 
maid’ were greatly interested, and 
asked me a great many questions 
about his methods. I hope he will go 
into active production here.” 

Some of Hurd’s early publicity in 
pictures emphasized his remarkable 
ability for concentration, which was 
said to be achieved by staring for two 
hours a day at a coin or some such 
object—part of the Chekhov training, 
it was explained. 

“That sounds a little nutty,” he 
laughed. “As a matter of fact, there’s 
more to it than that. Naturally, con¬ 
centration is very important to an 
actor. He has to concentrate on his 
own lines, on other people’s lines, on 
mood, situation, etc. In order to de- 
(Continued on page 84) 



Hopper's stopper topper . . ^.the hat which 
stopped a tennis match. It really did! 


82 






















Editor’s Note: In answer to the 
many, many Movieland reader re¬ 
quests for addresses of this or that 
fan favorite, it’s necessary to explain: 
sorry, no can do. We can’t hand out 
home addresses, or unlisted personal 
telephone numbers—don’t you wish 
we could!—but, we can “put you in 
touch,” through this star-studio di¬ 
rectory. 

The- list given here, complete and 
accurate as it’s possible to make it, 
has been prepared “as of the present.” 
We ask you to keep this in mind, be¬ 
cause some of the player contracts 
are shared by more than one studio, 
others are signed for a single picture, 
and still others specifically reserve the 
right to “free lance” from one studio 
to another. Named here, in each case, 
is the studio where mail should be 
be addressed now. 

Col—Columbia Pictures Corp. 

1438 North Gower 
Hollywood 28, Calif. 

DOS—David O. Selznick Prod., Inc. 
9336 West Washington Blvd. 
Culver City, Calif. 

Int—International Pictures 

1041 North Formosa Ave. 
Hollywood 46, Calif. 

MGM—Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios 
Culver City 
California 

Mon—Monogram Pictures Corp. 

4376 Sunset Blvd. 

Hollywood 27, Calif. 

Par—Paramount Pictures Corp. 

5451 Marathon 
Hollywood 38, Calif. 

RKO—RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. 

780 North Gower 
Hollywood 38, Calif. 

Rep—Republic Studios 

4024 Radford Ave. 

North Hollywood, Calif. 

SG—Samuel Goldwyn Studios 
1041 N. Formosa Ave. 

Hollywood 46, Calif. 

SL—Sol Lesser Prod. 

9336 W. Washington Blvd. 

Culver City, Calif. 

20—Twentieth Century-Fox Films 
10201 West Pico Blvd. 

West Los Angeles 24, Calif. 

UA—United Artists Studio Corp. 

1041 N. Formosa Ave. 

Hollywood 46, Calif. 

U—Universal Pictures Co. 

Universal City, Calif. 

WB—Warner Bros. Studios 
Burbank, California 
A—Abbott & Costello—U; Allbritton, 
Louise—U; Allyson, June—MGM; 
Ameche, Don—20; Anderson, Mary 
—20; Andrews, Dana—20; Arden, 
Eve—WB; Arthur, Jean — RKO; 
Astaire, Fred—MGM; Astor, Mary 
—MGM; Aumont, Jean Pierre— 
RKO; Autrey, Gene—Rep. 

B—Bacall, Lauren—WB; Bainter, Fay 
—MGM; Ball, Lucille—MGM; 
Bankhead, Tallulah—20; Bari, Lynn 
—20; Barnes, Binnie—RKO; Don 
(Red) Barry—Rep; Barrymore, Li¬ 
onel—MGM; Baxter, Anne—MGM; 
Beery, Wallace —MGM; Bellamy, 
Ralph—U; Bendix, Wm.—20; Ben¬ 
nett, Bruce—WB; Bennett, Con¬ 
stance— UA; Bennett, Joan—U; 


Benny, Jack—WB; Bergman, In¬ 
grid—DOS; Bey, Turhan—U; Bish¬ 
op, Julie—WB; Blr.ine, Vivian—20; 
Blair, Janet—Col; Blondell, Joan— 
20; Blyth, Ann—-WB; Bogart, Hum¬ 
phrey — WB; Bowman, Lee — Col; 
Boyer, Chas.—Col; Bracken, Eddie 
— Par; Bremer, Lucille —MGM; 
Brent, Geo.—Int; Britton, Barbara 
—Par; Brown, James—-WB; Bruce, 
David—U; Bruce, Virginia—Rep; 
Burnett, Smiley—Col. 

C—Cagney, James—UA; Canova, Judy 
—Rep; Cardwell, James—UA; Car- 
roll, John — UA; Carson, Jack — 
WB; Clark, Dane — WB; Cobum, 
Chas. — Col; Colbert, Claudette — 
Int; Colman, Ronald—MGM; Con¬ 
way, Tom—RKO; Cook, Donald— 
U.; Cooper, Gary—Int; Cotten, Jo¬ 
seph— DOS; Coy, Johnny — Par; 
Craig, James—MGM; Crain, Jeanne 
—20; Crawford, Joan—WB; Crosby, 
Bing—Par; Cummings, Robt.—Par; 
Curtis, Alan—U. 

D—Dali, John—WB; Dantine, Helmut— 
WB; Darnell, Linda — 20; Davis, 
Bette—WB; Davis, Joan—U; Day, 
Laraine—RKO; DeCarlo, Yvonne— 
U; DeCordova, Arturo—Par; DeHa- 
ven, Gloria — MGM; DeHavilland, 
Olivia—Par; Donlevy, Brian—Par; 
Drake, Tom—MGM; Dunne, Irene— 
Col; Durbin, Deanna—U; Duryea, 
Dan—U. 

E—Edwards, Bill—Par; Emerson, Faye 
— WB; Errol, Leon — U; Evans, 
Dale—Rep; Eythe, Wm.—20. 

F—Falkenburg, Jinx—Col; Faye, Alice 
— 20; Field, Betty — UA; Fields, 
Gracie—MGM; Fitzgerald, Barry— 
Par; Fitzgerald, Geraldine — U; 
Flynn, Errol—WB; Fontaine, Joan 
—DOS; Ford, Glenn—Col; Foster, 
Preston—20; Foster, Susanna—U; 
Francis, Kay — Mon; Freeman, 
Mona—Col. 

G—Gable, Clark—MGM; Garfield, John 
—WB; Garland, Judy—MGM; Gar¬ 
ner, Peggy Ann—20; Garson, Greer 
—MGM; Gifford, Frances—MGM; 
Gish, Lillian—Par; Goddard, Pau¬ 
lette— Par; Grable, Betty — 20; 
Grant, Cary—RKO; Granville, Bo¬ 
nita—U; Grayson, Kathryn—MGM. 

H—Hall, Jon—U; Harding, Ann—WB; 
Harens, Dean—U; Hasso, Signe— 
MGM; Hatfield, Hurd—MGM; Ha¬ 
ver, June—20; Hayward, Louis— 
UA; Hayward, Susan—Par; Hay¬ 
worth, Rita—Col; Heather, Jean— 
Par; Henie, Sonja—Int; Henreid, 
Paul—RKO; Hepburn, Katharine— 
MGM; Hodiak, John—MGM; Hope, 
Bob — Par; Horne, Lena — M GM; 
Hunt, Marsha — MGM; Hussey, 
Ruth — UA; Huston, Walter — 
MGM; Hutton, Betty—Par; Hut¬ 
ton, Bob—WB. 

J—James, Harry—20; Johnson, Van— 
MGM; Jones, Allan—U; Jones, Jen¬ 
nifer—DOS; Joyce, Brenda—U. 

K—Karloff, Boris—U; Kaye, Danny— 
SG; Keyes, Evelyn — Col; Knox, 
Alexander—Col; Kreuger, Kurt— 
WB; Kyser, Kay—MGM. 

L—Ladd, Alan—Par; Lake, Veronica— 
Par; Lamarr, Hedy — RKO; La- 
mour, Dorothy—Par; Landis, Ca¬ 
role— RKO; Langford, Frances — 


RKO; Lansbury, Angela — MGM; 
Laughton, Charles — U; Lawford, 
Peter—MGM; Leslie, Joan — WB; 
Loder, John—RKO; Loy, Myrna— 
MGM; Lukas, Paul—RKO; Lupino, 
Ida—WB; Lynn, Diana—Par. 

M—MacMurray, Fred — 20; Madison, 
Guy—DOS; Marshal, Alan—RKO; 
Mayo, Virginia—SG, McCallister, 
Lon—20; McCrea, Joel—Par; Mc¬ 
Donald, Marie —Int; McDowall, 
Roddy—MGM; Maguire, Dorothy— 
RKO; Milland, Ray—Par; Miranda, 
Carmen—20; Montez, Maria — U; 
Montgomery, Robt.—MGM; Moran, 
Dolores — WB; Morgan, Dennis — 
WB; Morris, Chester—Par; Muni, 
Paul—Col; Murphy, George—RKO. 
N—Neal, Tom—RKO; Nolan, Lloyd— 
20. 

O—Oakie, Jack—U; Obei’on, Merle—U; 
O’Brien, Margaret—MGM; O’Brien, 
Pat— U; O’Hara, Maureen—RKO; 
O’Keefe, Dennis—Rep; O’Shea, Mi¬ 
chael—20. 

P—Paige, Robt. — U; Parker, Jean — 
Par; Patrick, Gail — UA; Payne, 
John—20; Peck, Gregory—MGM; 
Peters, Susan — MGM; Pidgeon, 
Walter — MGM; Powell, Dick — 
RKO; Powell, Jane—MGM; Pow¬ 
ell, Wm.—MGM; Price, Vincent— 
20. 

R—Raft, George—RKO; Rains, Claude 
—WB; Raines, Ella—U; Rathbone, 
Basil — U; Reed, Donna — MGM; 
Reynolds, Joyce — WB; Richards, 
Ann — RKO; Rogers, Ginger — 
RKO; Rogers, Roy—Rep; Russell, 
Gail — Par; Russell, Jane, UA; 
Russell, Rosalind-—RKO; Ruther¬ 
ford, Ann—UA; Ryan, Peggy—U. 
S—Sanders, Geo.—MGM; Scott,'Ran¬ 
dolph—RKO; Scott, Zachary—WB; 
Sheridan, Ann—WB; Shirley, Anne 
—RKO; Shore, Dinah—Int; Si¬ 
natra, Frank — RKO; Singleton, 
Penny—Col; Slezak, Walter—RKO; 
Smith, Alexis—WB; Sothern, Ann 
—MGM; Stanwyck, Barbara—Par; 
Sullivan, Barry—Par. 

T—Taylor, Eliz.—MGM; Temple, Shir¬ 
ley— DOS; Tierney, Gene — 20; 
Tone, Franchot—UA; Tracy, Spen¬ 
cer—MGM; Trevor, Claire—RKO; 
Tufts, Sonny — Par; Turner, Lana 
—MGM. 

W—Walker, Bob—MGM; Wayne, John 
—Rep; Wilde, Cornel—Col; Wil¬ 
liams, Bill—RKO; Williams, Esther 
—MGM; Woolley, Monty—MGM; 
Wright, Teresa—SG; Wyman, Jane 
—WB. 

Y—Young, Loretta—Int; Young, Robt. 
—MGM. 



Jane Greer, James Warren; "Sunset Pass" RKO. 


83 





















City . Zone.. 


State 


Instantly, You'll See 
the Results of this Famous 

3-WAY MEDICINAL 
TREATMENT 

You don’t have to wait week after week—try 
just one application of the Glover’s 3-Way 
Medicinal Treatment tonight — and tomorrow 
you’ll see the difference! Compare the lovelier, 
natural-looking color tones—the fresh radiance 
—the sparkling highlights and clear, soft, ex¬ 
quisite beauty of your hair. Get all three today 
— Glover’s Original Mange Medicine — GLO¬ 
VER Beauty Shampoo—Glover’s Imperial Hair 
Dress—and use separately or in one complete 
treatment. Ask for the regular sizes at any Drug 
Store or Drug Counter—or mail the Coupon for 
FREE application! 

GLOVER’S 

with massage, for DANDRUFF, ANNOYING 
SCALP and EXCESSIVE FALLING HAIR 

FREE TRIAL 

Send Coupon for all 
three products in her¬ 
metically-sealed bottles, 
with complete instruc¬ 
tions for Glover's 3-Way 
Treatment and useful 
FREE booklet, “The Sci¬ 
entific Care of Scalp and 
Hair.” 


GLOVER'S, 101 West 31st St., 
Dept. 673, New York 1, N. Y. 
Send Free Trial Application package in plain wrap¬ 
per by return mail, containing Glover’s Mange 
Medicine, GLOVER Shampoo and Glover's Hair 
Dress, in 3 hermetically-sealed bottles, with FREE 
booklet. 1 enclose 10c to cover cost of packaging 
and postage. 

Name . 


(Continued from page 82) 
velop this faculty, Chekhov taught us 
to study some object, a coin, box, ash¬ 
tray—anything. You were supposed 
to study the outline of it, the dimen¬ 
sions, color, material—all its physical 
properties. Then you were supposed 
to think about it, identify yourself 
with it, until finally you almost were 
that object. That was the exercise, and 
it really does wonders.” 

Another thing Hurd would like to 
debunk is the story that he can mem¬ 
orize a script practically by flipping 
through the pages. 

“The story got out that I have this 
phenomenal memory, whereas I have 
a great deal of trouble with my 
memory. I was supposed to have 
memorized the whole script of ‘The 
Picture of Dorian Gray’ overnight, 
before reading the part for Albert 
Lewin (who produced the picture). 
As a matter of fact, I didn’t know a 
line of any scene. But I did re-read 
the story, which I hadn’t read since 
college days and had forgotten. In 
this way, I got the pattern for certain 
scenes in my mind, and when Mr. 
Lewin asked me to read, I just im¬ 
provised. Improvisation was a thing 
that Chekhov especially emphasized. 
When he asked me to go with him 
to another executive’s office and do 
the scene, I said, ‘I can’t—I don’t 
know the lines. I was improvising, and 
I couldn’t do it again exactly the same 
way.’ ” 

Like everyone else, Hurd regards 
with horror the destructive possibili¬ 
ties presented by the atomic bomb, 
but he thinks they are less dangerous 
than selfishness and prejudice. On this 
subject he says: 

“I think one of the finest things 
about acting is that it helps free one 
from prejudice. You play characters 
of all different nationalities or races. 
In order to play a character, you’ve 
got to try to understand him, think as 
he thinks, feel as he feels, to sym¬ 
pathize with him. How can you do 
that and be prejudiced against him 
at the same time?” 

As to his own future, it might sur¬ 
prise you, and also his home studio, to 
know that he wants to do a musical. 
He can sing, too, though he doesn’t 
think the studio knows it. Not that it’s 
any secret, fact is, they just never 
asked him! 

With all due respect to motion pic¬ 
tures, Hurd believes that the greatest 
satisfaction for the actor will always 
be on the stage, because of the greater 
variety offered, and also because of 
the stimulation in long, sustained per¬ 
formances, which is not possible in 
pictures. 

“It’s a directors’ world out here. 
Directors and producers do all the 
creative effort. It’s no criticism against 
anybody that an actor has to work in 
spasmodic effort, without the over-all 
conception of his work that is possible 
on the stage. That’s the way a picture 
has to be made and it can’t be helped. 
But I think this way of working 
weakens an actor if he does it too 
long.” 

“And what is your greatest ambi¬ 
tion?” he was asked. 

“What almost every actor wants to 
do,” came the prompt reply. “ ‘Ham¬ 
let.’ I know I won’t be ready for it 
for years. I would need a great deal 
of time to study and prepare myself 
for it. But the last thing before I step 
into my coffin, I hope I can plav 
‘Hamlet’.” P y 

The End 



Before 

and 

after 


fdidn't 6eiiev& it .. 

UNTIL! TRIEDf“ 




Says 

HELEN 

SHARITER 

of 

New York 
City 


BEFORE 

LOSES 

22 POUNDS 

IN 5 WEEKS 

New Friends and Interests 
Make New World for Her 

Helen Shariter never wanted to 
believe anything. She thought 
she was meant to be stout and 
unattractive. A friend told her 
how the Bonomo Culture Insti¬ 
tute Home Course helped her 
and persuaded Helen to send 
for it. These pictures show the 
amazing improvement in 5 short 
weeks. 

SUCCESS THROUGH BEAUTY 

Many girls say they don’t care 
how they look. Actually they do. 

Ask yourself! “What do I want 
more than anything in this 
world?” A normal girl will say, 

“I want to be attractive, popu¬ 
lar . . , successful!” _ 

You can, if you’ll try! Thousands have made a 
new life for themselves through the Modern 
Beauty Methods oi the Bonomo Home Course. 
Mr. Bonomo, director, has had over 20 years’ ex¬ 
perience in Hollywood and New York helping stars 
of stage and screen to success through beauty. 


AFTER 


NOT JUST A 
REDUCING COURSE 

With over 200 how-to-do-it 
photos you’ll learn simply and 
quickly . . . How to Make up 
Properly; the correct Hair-Do 
for You; How to Dress Better 
and save money; How to Move 
Gracefully; and many more 
valuable beauty hints. 

SEND NO MONEY 

Mr. Bonomo makes you this 
offer. “Send for this Course 
today—try it for ten days. If 
you don't see a marked improve¬ 
ment in yourself ... If you 
don’t agree it’s worth more 
than courses costing 10 times as 
much—then return it and your 
money will be promptly refund¬ 
ed. Remember, I only ask you 
to try.” 

MAIL COUPON TODAY 



Complete 
Home Course 


JOE BONOMO 

world famous 
beauty authority 
and publisher of 
"Beautify Your 
Figure", 
your guide to 
Grace. Beauty 
and Charm . . . 
at all newsstands. 


?<,°.^?, M0 J CULTURE INSTITUTE. Dept. 323 
1841 Broadway. New York 23. N. Y. 

-fend me ln . pla * n wrapper complete Bonomo Institute 
Form , < -,°, ur , se *?. Success through Beauty of Face and 
11 deposit with postman $2.95 plus postage. If not 
de ghted 1 may return Course In 10 days and my money 


Name 

Address 


PleasePrint’piiiinfy" 


City 

□ 


Zone. State. 

JI 6ncloge (B $'2.95 f°r delivery postpaid. 

~ advance) 


. r , VIICVOC VL.dtl I Ul ULIIVCIJ 

(Canada and Foreign $3.50. Cash in 
























THE LASS WITH THE DELICATE AIR 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 451 


To say that this grey-eyed sprite 
had accommodated herself perfectly 
to the world in which she finds her¬ 
self, would be a vast mis-statement. 
She adapts herself as well as she 
can; but orderly, purposeful, plumb- 
line behavior puzzles her. 

It is quite safe to say that Miss 
McGuire could never be accused of 
thinking or acting dully. Nor could 
she be guaranteed to behave predict¬ 
ably. 

She started, for instance, in bright¬ 
eyed search of a gift for a girl friend 
who was soon to have a child. She 
strolled into one infants’ apparel store 
and gazed about critically. To a 
friend whom she had persuaded to 
accompany her on the shopping ex¬ 
pedition, Dorothy said with dissatis¬ 
faction, “I don’t see anything to buy.” 

The friend sat down in one of the 
chairs foresightedly provided. “This 
is one of the few stores in Southern 
California that really has something 
to sell,” whispered the friend. “Please! 
Look around. Hand-knitted robes, 
hand-crocheted booties, hand-em¬ 
broidered dresses. Electric bottle 
warmers, plastic bib pins, illuminated 
night pictures. Furthermore, this 
place even has a few dozen diapers!” 

“But all the things are for little 
babies,” said Dorothy, as if the sim¬ 
ple statement explained everything. 

The friend’s eyes hardened. “Little 
babies—yes. That’s the way they’re 
being delivered this season, dear.” 

“It’s foolish to buy anything for a 
very little baby. Mothers always buy 
much too much for the first, and this 
is going to be a second baby, so it 
will have enough hand-me-down 
clothing for quadruplets. Then, since 
she’s having a shower, she’ll get a 
lot more clothing and infant equip¬ 
ment, which the baby will outgrow 
before he can use. No—I want some¬ 
thing for a middle-aged baby.” And 
Miss McGuire dreamily led the way 
out of the store. 

She and her friend wandered on 
down the street in quest of a twixt- 


teen store. Before a red barn that 
had been painted, polished and con¬ 
verted into an antique store, Dorothy 
paused and read the sign announcing 
a close-out sale with attendant bar¬ 
gains. In wandered the girl who, re¬ 
member, was shopping for a shower 
gift. She fell into conversation with 
the proprietor, a French woman who 
was disposing of her stock because 
she wanted to return to France. 

Hanging on a wall was a superb 
carpet that entranced the McGuire 
eye: it was an authentic French 
antique velvet done in soft rose 
shades; here and there were abraded 
spots worn thin by the hurrying feet 
of silken ladies long dead; here and 
there were lines of warp laid bare by 
the boots of cavaliers long since dust. 

“How much is it?” asked Dorothy 
quietly. 

The shopkeeper mentioned a figure. 
Dorothy swallowed. She said she 
would pay a sum just about one-half 
of the asking price, but the shop¬ 
keeper shook her head. She wanted 
the money with which to return to 
France. 

Said her friend to Dorothy, “Come 
on, dear, let’s run across the street 
for a moment. I have an errand I 
want to do before the shop closes.” 

“I’ve got to have that rug,” said 
Dorothy. 

“You can make up your mind in 
the morning,” said the friend, steer¬ 
ing Dorothy out of the shop by one 
reluctant elbow. They separated at 
their respective cars, after Dorothy 
had promised to give the price and 
the condition of the floor covering 
some serious thought. Pointed out 
the provident friend: “You plan to 
build a house some day soon, but that 
rug may not fit into any possible 
decorating theme. And, it’s so old, 
Dorothy. It will have to have re¬ 
pairs done by an expert.” 

“Hmmmmmm—isn’t it romantic to 
think . . murmured Dorothy. 

“You go home and sleep on it. And 
write to your husband,” cautioned 





Mail Coupon Today 
m for FREE Samples 

Read this thrilling news! 
You don’t pay one penny 
^p£ever, for your choice of gor- 
p i geous new dress in your own 
{/ | favorite style, size and color. 
X / Select your dress from more 
than 100 newest Harford 
Frocks styles—and it’s 
yours just for sending orders 
for only 3 dresses for your 
friends, neighbors, or mem¬ 
bers of your family. That’s 
all! Not one cent to pay now 
pr any other time—every¬ 
thing supplied without cost! 

Experience Not Needed 
—Use Spare Time 

Imagine showing your friends 
and neighbors a vast complete 
selection of gorgeous, exquisitely- 
designed Harford Frocks—more 
than 100 styles, all sizes, and 
scores of beautiful fabrics in the season’s latest colors 
and patterns—as well as hosiery, lingerie, sportswear, 
suits, coats, children’s wear, etc. Your friends and 
neighbors will be eager to give 
you their orders when they see 
the beauty of the styles, the 
huge selection, and learn the 
LOW MONEY-SAVING 
PRICES. And for sending or¬ 
ders, for only 3 dresses at the 
low regular prices, YOU CAN 
SELECT YOUR OWN DRESSi 
TO BE SENTITO YOU without 
paying one cent for it! And thi3 
thrilling plan does not stop with 
only one dress! You can go right 
on getting dress after dress, until 
you have a complete wardrobe! 

Gorgeous Style Presentations Sent FREE! 

Mail Coupon Below 

Yes—we send you gorgeous presen- 
tation showing scores of latest 
fashions with actual sample fabrics 
In dresses, lingerie, children’s wear,! 
sportswear, suits, coats, etc. Due to 
present conditions we may not be 
able to send your Style Presenta¬ 
tion at once—but rush coupon be¬ 
low now to place your name on our 
list and be among the first to receive 
the new Style Line when available. 

No money needed. Don't miss this 
opportunity to get complete ward¬ 
robe for yourself—with chance to 
earn up to $22.00 in a week cash 
besides. Mall coupon now. 

HARFORD FROCKS, INC. 

DaptB9004,Cincinnatl 25, Ohio 

~llARFORD FROCKS, INC. 

Dept.BM04,Cinclnnatl 25, Ohio 

I want to get a dress for myself 
for ordering 3 dresses for friends, or members of 
my family. Please rush me the new Harford frocks 
Style Presentation FREE as soon as possible. 

Name. 

Address. 

City.State. 

My Age Is. 



r 


Ethel Barrymore relaxes with Dorothy McGuire 'tween scenes of "The Spiral Staircase 


85 


















SMART WIFE , PAZO RELIEVED 
THOSE SIMPLE PILES 


JIM > I KNOW FROM 


Don’t just suffer the agonizing pain, 
torture, itching of simple piles. Re¬ 
member, for over thirty years amazing 
PAZO ointment has given prompt, 
comforting relief to millions. It gives 
you soothing, welcome palliative relief. 

HOW PAZO OINTMENT WORKS 

1. Soothes inflamed areas—relieves pain 
and itching. 2. Lubricates hardened, 
dried parts, helps prevent cracking and 
soreness. 3. Tends to reduce swelling 
and check minor bleeding. 4. Provides 
quick and easy method of application. 

SPECIAL PILE PIPE FOR 
EASY APPLICATION 

Pazo ointment tube has a specially de¬ 
signed, perforated Pile Pipe, making 
application simple and thorough. Ask 
your doctor about wonderful Pazo oint¬ 
ment and the soothing, blessed relief 
it gives for simple piles. 

PAZO SUPPOSITORIES TOO! 

Some persons, and many doctors, pre¬ 
fer to use suppositories. So Pazo is also 
made in handy suppositories. Same 
soothing relief! Get Pazo in the form 
you prefer, at your druggists today. 

A Product of 

THE GROVE LABORATORIES INC. • Si. Louis, Mo. 




Imagine—in just a few weeks every trace of 
gray was gone, and the change was so gradual 
and so perfect my friends forgot I ever had 
a gray hair. Wonderful, how you can now 


86 


Just Comb the Gray Away! 

It’s so easy, so simple! Just comb your hair 
once a day for a few days with a few drops 
of Kolor-Bak sprinkled on your comb. No 
muss; no fuss; no mixing. Kolor-Bak is a 
solution for artificially coloring 
gray hair that imparts color and 
charm and abolishes gray hair 
worries quickly. 

Men, too, Praise the 

2^ KOLOR-BAK 



They find it helps them look years younger; 
makes them feel more secure about business 
and social success. Get 
new Kolor-Bak at 
your drug or depart¬ 
ment store on mak¬ 
er’s guarantee of satis- 
faction or money 
back. 


Solution for Artificially 
Coloring Gray Hair 



the friend—but to no avail. 

The instant she reached home, 
Dorothy telephoned the shop. In a 
blind rush, she ordered the rug. 
Then, like Scarlett, she turned res¬ 
olutely away from the cost. “I won’t 
think about it tonight. I’ll think 
about that tomorrow,” she decided. 

Currently, this rare and exquisite 
rug is placed on top of the broadloom 
in Dorothy’s modern furnished apart¬ 
ment. Someone, noting it with 
breathless admiration, asked Dorothy, 
‘‘What is its size?” 

Dorothy’s eyes moved down in 
thought. “About 8Y2 by 11,” she 
said. 

Her guest howled. “You beauti¬ 
ful dope,” said the visitor affection¬ 
ately, “Rugs don’t come in that sort 
of dimension. Probably the rug is 
9 feet by twelve feet. A sheet of 
typewriting paper is 8 Vz inches by 
eleven.” 

“I knew I’d heard that measure¬ 
ment somewhere,” said Miss Mc¬ 
Guire serenely. 

L’affaire du rug is not the first time 
Dorothy McGuire has fallen in love 
at first sight with an object and re¬ 
fused to be provident or sensible or 
resigned about it. When she was 
touring American Army camps over¬ 
seas in the USO road show of “Dear 
Ruth” she chanced upon an antique 
copper lavatory. A rather large af¬ 
fair, it had been designed to hang 
outdoors from an arbor or similar 
arch. Above was a small tank with 
a spigot, and below the spigot was a 
huge hanging basin. In bygone days, 
Inn guests—dusty from long horse¬ 
back rides—would turn on the spigot 
and wash their hands beneath the 
small flowing stream. 

Dorothy’s imagination leaped to 
life like tinder touched by a match. 
“I must have it,” she told the some¬ 
what astonished dealer. The en¬ 
suing conversation brought up for 
consideration the facts that (1) the 
copper lavatory was expensive, even 
considering the rate of exchange; 
(2) she didn’t have enough money in 
her possession to buy it; (3) because 
of wartime currency restrictions and 
wartime shipping regulations, she was 
going to have a nightmarish time 
buying the object in the first place, 
and a simonized nightmarish time 
getting the thing back to the States. 

P.S. It is now in storage in New 
York. Nothing can foil a determined 
McGuire. 

It was while she was on vacation in 
Tucson with her husband that Doro¬ 
thy again fell victim to the must- 
have-its. One evening the Swopes 
were strolling along a side street 
and were attracted by an Indian 
store. They paused to study the 
turquoise rings, bracelets and tie 
clasps, the dyed-feather Indian war 
bonnets, the handmade Indian dolls, 
and the myriad other handicrafted 
items. 

Suddenly, bringing her hands to¬ 
gether in a soundless instant of ap¬ 
plause, Dorothy breathed, “Look! In 
there, hanging high on that shelf . . .” 

It was a heavy, hand-wrought In¬ 
dian belt made of sterling silver conch 
shells linked together. Dorothy darted 
into the store, followed by her 
amused husband. Like a frantic child, 
she could scarcely keep her feet on 
the floor while the storekeeper 
climbed stiffly on the ladder making 
the high shelf reachable. 

“A beautiful piece,” he said. “One 
of the heaviest, most ^ intricately 
wrought belts I have ever seen.” And 



avoid embarrassment of unwanted hair. Painless, 
easy, effective, inexpensive . . . without shaving, 
pulling or harsh chemicals. Gives a smooth, dainty 
appearance. It was developed by a young woman 
cursed for years by ugly unwanted hair. It worked 
charmingly. Her poise, love and happiness returned. 
She has helped thousands who voice everlasting 
gratitude. Now, no one need know you have a 
superfluous hair problem. 


FREE.aaSend No Money 

Accept FREE WONDER METHOD booklet “How to Meet 
the Superfluous Hair Problem.” Gives complete facts 
and proof of results. Sent with TRIAL OFFER in plain en¬ 
velope. No obligation. Write ANNETTE LANZETTE, Box 

4040* Merchandise Mart, Dept. 311. Chicago 54* III. 



Free Booklet, Marvel Co,, 70 East St., New Haven, Ct. 


BEAUTIFUL LEGS 


are essential to feminine loveliness! 


The Young Course in Contour Control 
will help you to make—and keep—your 
legs attractive, your hips slim, your stom¬ 
ach flat, and your waistline slender. 

Full details gladly sent upon request. 
WANDA YOUNG Box 1208, Tucson, Aril. 



_r qu: _ __ __ 

Dent's Tooth Drops! “Cavity Toothache" frequently 
strikes at night. Be prepared. Buy either package 
from your druggist today. Keep it handy for 
children and adults. Follow easy directions. . 


DENTS 


TOOTH CUM \ 
TOOTH DROPS 


^j:[.n»H;7?TUTr a 


Nationwide opportunities, 
sound future career waiting. 
Success-proved home study 
courses. Also resident. Start 
now. Write for FREE catalog. 


(OPPO RTUNITIES 

N. Y. INSTITUTE OF PHOTOGRAPHY 
10 W. 33 St., Dept. 94, New York 1, N. Y 



DEVELOP THE PO WERFUL I NFLUENCE 

FEUCHTINGER W/ethod Guaranteed 

[DCE 


IN YOUR 


DO IT YOURSELF AT HOME 


Write far the Voice Book - FREE'! 

Sent only fb those over l7yrsof age 


Studio 6343, 910 Kimball Hall Bldg.. Chicago 4. III. 


Now She Shops 
‘Cash And Carry” 

Without Painful Backache ' 

Many sufferers relieve nagging backache quickly, 
once they discover that the real cause of their trouble 
may be tired kidneys. 

The kidneys are Nature’s chief way of taking the 
excess acids and waste out of the blood. They help 
most people pass about 3 pints a day. 

When disorder of kidney function permits poison¬ 
ous matter to remain in your blood, it may cause nag¬ 
ging backache, rheumatic pains, leg pains, loss of pep 
and energy, getting up nights, swelling, puffiness 
under the eyes, headaches and dizziness. Frequent or 
scanty passages with smarting and burning some¬ 
times shows there is something wrong with your 
kidneys or bladder. 

Don’t wait! Ask your druggist for Doan’s Pills, 
a stimulant diuretic, used successfully by millions 
for over 40 years. Doan’s give happy relief and will 
help the 15 miles of kidney tubes flush out poison- 
ous waste from your blood. Get Doan’s Pills. 


































he named a staggering price. 

Dorothy was holding the silver 
girdle in two faintly quivering hands. 
“Isn’t it gorgeous?” she murmured. 
“Have you ever seen anything . . 

Under his breath John asked, “How 
much money do you have in your 
purse?” 

“About sixty or seventy cents,” she 
answered blithely. 

Mr. Swope edged his wife to one 
side in order to explain that he was 
somewhat flat, too. They couldn’t buy 
the belt that night. Miss McGuire 
didn’t exactly cry but her eyes were 
grey lakes reflecting a foggy sky. “It 
would be silly to invest so much 
money in an Indian belt,” she an¬ 
nounced staunchly. “I’m glad we 
didn’t have enough money to buy it. 
I don't really want it at all—sort 
of . . .” 

“They want an awful lot of dough 
for that gadget,” said Mr. Swope. “Of 
course, it’s hand-made and the price of 
silver is pretty high now.” 

Dorothy said something about an 
Indian sitting for hours, investing his 
life and his eyesight and his skill in 
making the belt. A silence fell be¬ 
tween them, and the belt was not 
mentioned again. 

Two nights later, Dorothy was 
dressing to go to a party. She was 
wearing a black jersey turtle-neck 
sweater of the kind that she likes, and 
with it she was wearing a coarse red 
wool skirt of formal length. Looking 
herself over critically, she thought, 
“How I need that belt. This outfit 
needs some type of glitter right 
around the waist. . . 

Her husband came into the room 
and stood behind Dorothy, looking 
over her shoulder at her mirrored 
image. Slowly he shook out the tin¬ 
kling silver belt, clasped it around 
Dorothy’s waist, and stood back to ad¬ 
mire the effect. The effect was highly 
gratifying; even if he couldn’t see the 
belt because of the jubilantly ex¬ 
pressed thanks of the girl in his arms. 

Since Dorothy has always repre¬ 
sented her enthusiasms with such in¬ 
tense fervor, and since those who 
know her best realize that ardent as is 
her inclination to possess some object, 
if she doesn’t get it she mopes for a 
time and then forgets it, there are 
times when her loudest anmrunce- 
ments of McGuire needs or McGuire 
tastes are treated lightly. 

From an Indian belt to an incident 
of near drowning may seem like a 
fast hop, but the basic situation is 
similar. She had said she would die 
of a broken heart if she didn’t have 
that Indian belt; she didn’t get it for 
nearly a week, and she remained the 
picture of health. 

So, when she and her husband were 
rowing a boat out to the buoy and 
Dorothy announced, “I don’t think I 
can get back to shore. I’m not a very 
good swimmer, you know,” he grinned 
and said, “Yeah—I know. You’ll prob¬ 
ably porpoise in, making me look like 
a frozen turtle.” 

Dorothy smiled. “Really, I can’t 
swim very well,” she insisted gently. 
“I can go about twenty feet, then I 
want to stop and rest.” 

“I should have brought a chair,” 
laughed Mr. Swope. 

That made Dorothy mad. The in¬ 
stant the boat was tethered, she slid 
over the side and began to paddle 
frantically for shore. It was the first 
time Mr. Swope had ever seen his 
wife in the water, and—like any ex¬ 
perienced swimmer would have—he 
recognized at once that she hadn’t 


ENLARGEMENT 

OF YOUR FAVORITE PHOTO 




JUST TO GET ACQUAINTED! WE WILL MAKE 
YOU A BEAUTIFUL 5 I 7 ENLARGEMENT OF ANY 
SNAPSHOT. PHOTO. OR NEGATIVE ABSOLUTELY FREE! 

Be sure to include color of hair, eyes and clothing, and get Our Bar¬ 
gain Offer for having your enlargement beautifully hand colored in 
oil and mounted in a handsome frame. Limit 2 to a customer. Please 
enclose 10c each for handling and mailing the enlargements. Orig¬ 
inals returned. Be sure to include all information. Act Now! 

HOLLYWOOD FILM STUDIOS • 7021 Siata Multi lliO., RallywaiM a, Calif. 


HOLLYWOOD FILM STUDIOS, 


Dept.882 *"] 

7021 Santa Monica aivd., Hollywood 3S. Calif. Fill out description bafow. J 
Enclosed find_.snapshot or negative. Mark back of picture 1 & 2 ■ 

(specify number, JUmit 21 

Please make_.free enlargements. 


(specify number, limit 2) 

Handling and Mailing charge of 10c aach it oncloied 


LOOK THRU TOUR ALBUM 
SCLECT TOUR FAVORITE SNAPSHOTS 




COLOR - Picture No. 
Hair- 
Eyes. 


Clothing_ 

COLOR - Picture No. 2 

Hair__ 

Eyet_ 


Clothing 




Who Is the Robber That 
Steals Your Sleep? 


It is common knowledge that nothing under¬ 
mines health so quickly as loss of sleep. You 
know how just one or two sleepless nights 
can drag you down. Who is the "robber” that 
creeps upon you in the middle of the night 
and keeps you awake? Is it "NERVES” that 
rob you of the sleep you need? Nervous 
Tension can be responsible for so many 
Wakeful Nights as well as Crankiness, Rest¬ 
lessness, Nervous Headache and Indigestion. 
When you feel Nervous and Jittery—when 
you can’t sleep at night, why don’t you try 


Dr. Mile* Nervine? For over 50 years Dr. 
Miles Nervine has been a mild but effective 
sedative, that helps to quiet your nerves, re¬ 
lieve Nervous Tension, and permit Refreshing 
Sleep. Get Dr. Miles Nervine at your Drug 
Store. It comes in two forms. Liquid 25c and 
$ 1.00 sizes. Effervescent Tablets 35c and 75c 
sizes. Caution; read directions and use only as 
directed. See what it can do for you to relax 
tense nerves and help you get your sleep and 
rest. Mile* Laboratories, Inc., Elkhart, Ind. 




OVER 4 POUNDS BEAUTIFUL NEW MATERIALS 
Exeel lent Quality — Large and Colorful 

Bargain Sale! Lovely, new goods that will please 
you. Bright, gorgeous designs. You’ll be delighted! 

GIVEN SEWING OUTFIT AND 

UIVC.IT 20 QUILT PATTERNS WITH ORDER 

.Join our thousands of satisfied customers. Write 
today! SEND NO MONEY. Pay postman only 
$1.98 plus postage. Satisfaction Guaranteed or 
Money Back. Rush your order today! 

GREAT AMERICAN SALES CO. 

2226 Silverton Way, Oept. 534, Chicago 16, III. 


Gmuim OuManteedS\i\\SS MATCHES 

With 


LOWER THAN CEILING PRICES 

JUST ARRIVED—LIMITED QUANTITY! Distinctive, new, handsome— 
renowned for accurate timekeeping. Modernistically styled—finer quality. 
Precision built by Swiss craftsmen—noted for their outstanding excellence in 
material and workmanship. Smart, adjustable bands set off attractive cases 
to excellent advantage. Easy-to-read dials. Comes in beautiful gift boxes. 


ORDER NO. L-l 
Ladies' dainty 
One Jewel watch. 
Precision Movement. 
Adjustable Band. 
Smartly Designed. 


ORDER NO. M-l 
Men’s sturdy 
One Jewel watch. 
Genuine Leather 
Adjustable Band. 

Handsome. 
Precision Built. 


ORDER NO. L-2 
Ladies’ eiquisite 
Four Jewel watch. 
Adjustable Band. 
Beautifully Designed. 


ORDER NO. M-2 
Men’s dependable 
Four Jewel watch. 

Sweep Hand. 
Genuine Leather 
Adjustable Band. 


ORDER NO. L-3 
Ladies’ DeLuxe 
Seven Jewel watch. 
Fine Quality. 
Distinctively 
Styled. 

Adjustable Band. 


ORDER NO. M-3 
Men’s DeLuxe 
IS Jewel watch. 
Sweep hand. Radium 
hands and dial. 

Waterproof. 
Genuine Leather 
Adjustable Band. 


SEND NO MONEY 

WRITTEN GUARANTEE WITH EVERY WATCH. Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Back. Write today, telling; us 
which watch you want. Pay postman C.O.D., plus postage and 10% Federal tax. Immediate delivery. You'll be delighted! 

INTERNATIONAL DIAMOND CO., 2435 Indiana, Dept. 451 Chicago IS, Illinois 
















































VlUS hospital 

rL"* BILLS PAID! 


EVER OFFERED FOR 




SICKNESS BENEFITS! 

Polity pays for loss of time due 
to sickness, a regular monthly 
income for as long as 3 
months, up to. 


ACCIDENT BENEFITS! 

Policy pays for accident dis - 
ability at rate up to $100 per 
month, for as long as 24 
months, or . 


ACCUMULATED CASH! 

Policy pays for accidental loss 
of life, limb or sight up to 
$4,000, accumulated to. . . ... 


plus 0SP/rMMrm/i 

Pays §5 per day and other hospital ex 
pemee. For maternity up to-S50. Sick 
ness and accident, as specified, to over,. 

Added millions can now afford all-round insurance protec¬ 
tion! This policy, issued by an old-line, LEGAL RESERVE 
company, costs but Sl-a-month; yet it provides liberal 
amounts of QUICK CASH when sickness or accident strikes 
... to replace lost income, pay hospital bills, etc. Covers any 
and all accidents, all the common sicknesses*! 

NO waiting period for benefits! 

NO MEDICAL EXAMINATION 

required! No red tape! Policy issued BY MAIL 
at BIG SAVINGS. Ages 15 to 69. Actual Policv 
f° r days' FREE Examination. ACT 
NOW! Write for it today. No cost. No obliga- 
lion. No salesman will call. 


FftCC10-Doy Inspection Coupon 


* THE SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 
, 482-N Service Life Building Omaha 2, Nebr. 

I cost or obli gation, send your GOLD SEAL 

I 51-A-MONTH Policy for 10 DAYS' FREE INSPECTION. 

J Name_ 




a Address.. 
■ C»y- 


- Age_ 


- State- 


Beneficiary______t 



Women 3ai/tZfomp-Se\\ 

IfcuSiA-Viufif nylons 

IN AMAZING NEW FIT SERVICE 


Mail Coupon for 

FREE OUTFIT 

with sample stocking 

Enjoy taking orders from friends, 
in spare time, for amazing Yours- 
Truly Nylon Hosiery in a new In¬ 
dividual Customer Fit Service. Fit 
every type of leg; slim, stout, aver¬ 
age,short, long, extralong. No twisted 
seams, no baggy ankles, or binding at 
the top! Yours-Truly Nylons are more 
beautiful because they fit perfectly. De¬ 
lighted customers buy time after time. 

Be First! Mail Coupon 

Earn money of your own, build a steady 
business with Yours-Truly 
Nylon Hosiery that’s more 
beautiful because it fits per¬ 
fectly. Mail coupon for 
FREE OUTFIT, includ¬ 
ing actual sample stocking. 
Enclose a letter about yourself. 
Put money in the bank and cash in your 
purse for a few hours easy, delightful, dignified 
work. No experience required. No obligation. Act today. 
AMERICAN HOSIERY MILLS, Dept$-209, Indianapolis 7, Ind. 


j American Hosiery Mills, Dept. S-209,Indianapolia 7, Ind. 
| Send me complete outfit with sample stocking FREE. 
| I want to sell Yours-Truly Nylons in Individual Fit 
I Service. I enclose letter about myself. 


I 

I 

I 

L 


Name.. 
Address. 
City. . . 


Age.. 
State 


J 


been exaggerating. She was a wild 
swimmer and she was wearing herself 
out. 

About twenty feet from the boat, 
she turned and screamed at her hus¬ 
band, “I don’t think I can make it,” 
then she began to laugh. There was 
much more hysteria than mirth in the 
sound, but when she whipped the salt 
water out of her eyes long enough to 
catch a glimpse of her husband, Doro¬ 
thy really laughed. He was thinking 
that he had better knock her cold and 
tow her to shore and the notion was 
written plainly on his frightened face. 

That settled it. Controlling her 
panic, Dorothy set out valiantly for 
shore. She remembered everything 
she had ever heard or read about con¬ 
serving strength and making every 
movement count toward beaching a 
living body. Finally, however, she had 
to be towed by her thoroughly fright¬ 
ened husband. When, winded, they 
struck welcome sand and struggled up 
beyond the surf, a small cluster of 
observers had gathered. Abashed by 
their curiosity, most of them turned 
slowly and sauntered away when it 
became apparent that help wasn’t 
needed, but to a few stragglers, Miss 
McGuire called in triumph, “Well, I 
made it!” 

She always makes it. 

From “Claudia,” her first picture, 
to “Till The End Of Time,” in which 
she is currently working opposite Guy 
Madison at RKO, she has always 
emerged triumphant with laurels on 
her brow and applause in her ears. 

She thinks the most difficult charac¬ 
terization for her was the role of 
“Katie” in “A Tree Grows In Brook¬ 
lyn.” Her present part, that of a war 
widow who is fighting bitterness over 
her loss and who is working her way 
to rehabilitation quite as much as the 
returned veteran with whom she falls 
in love, is a role that she describes as 
“interesting because the girl is all 
mixed up inside. Basically, this girl 
is a nice person who has a problem 
and who takes some wrong ways of 
solving it.” 

Perhaps the role nearest Dorothy 
McGuire^s own personality is that of 
‘‘Claudia,” the insouciant Rose 
Franken brain child. 

. But even nearer would be that of 
Wendy in “Peter Pan” with one highly 
important difference. The tragedy of 
Wendy was that, when Peter Pan re¬ 
turned to take her flying with him, 
Wendy had grown up. Dorothy Mc¬ 
Guire, not of her own volition but 
because nature has made her un¬ 
changeable, will never grow up. She 
will be young Wendy perennially; a 
breath of spring, a melody half-for- 
gotten from childhood, a flash of gold 
on windows at sunset. 

And, incidentally, she’ll continue to 
be the delightful creature who strolls 
around Beverly Hills in fur coat, clam 
diggers, handmade Mexican sandals, 
and four different types of necklaces 
worn simultaneously over a black jer¬ 
sey blouse. 

There is no one in Hollywood, nor 
probably in the world, quite like her. 
She is unique—individual—and utter¬ 
ly enchanting. 

The End 


YOU ASKED FOR IT! 

By popular request Tom Drake will be 
Movieland’s cover boy for April issue. 
You’ll also find some interesting data 
on Drake’s career in a feature article. 


. Make AnyArt/c/e 

Mow&mM 

.. \ 

Magic New Discoverg! 



Don’t pay big prices 
for luminous articles^ 
Make your own! Sell 
at big profit or keep 
for your pleasure. 
With our complete 
outfit and confiden¬ 
tial instructions, it's 
easy! A stroke of the 
brush—any article 
glows in the dark like 
magic! Lasts indefi¬ 
nitely. Absolutely 
harmless. Hundreds 
of uses. Use on ties, 
flowers, jewelry, house 
numbers, furniture, 
pictures, statues, toys, 
etc. Order NOW! Sup¬ 
ply limited. Money- 
back guarantee. 
LITE-GLO, Dept. 127- 



w* 

Complete Lite* 
Glo Kit. $1.00. 
Send name, ad¬ 
dress, pay post¬ 
man $1.00 plus 
postal charges: 
Send cash, we 
pay postage. 

LC .Topeka, Kan. 



GIVEN 


1000 

NEW c C d 
CAMERAS 

Each With A 
Roll of Film 


AWAY 


Take clear si»ap 


-„i*ap- 

shots and pic¬ 
tures. We will 

-- send to at least 

!£ e l TL*.I 1 °J?jL WOm f n ,’ JT en ’ bo * s or 9' r, s answering this 
tyi ?? CAMERA and regular size roll 
* 9 ,VE £ fo r selling only one book of 8 coupons 
/Ti 1 , " ♦ 8 ^ and neighbors at. 2 Sc each and returning the 
money collected as per FREE gift catalog. Everyone wants 
pictures of loved ones that are true-to-life and natural, so 
these Coupons (good for 25c on a beautiful, 5x7 inch en¬ 
largement, made from a snapshot or picture) go fast. Send 
no money, just your name and address. We trust you. Write 
tftriav .DEAN STUDIOS, Dept. 12-C, 211 W 7th St 


Des Moines, Iowa. 


P©(w-kct/\.rt Corners- 

1 The Real Thing tor mounting Snapshots. Curds. Stamps, 
etc. No past** needed Pocket Gummed Inside for 
holding prints tight or loose. Near. Quick, and 
Artistic too. Sold at photo supply and album 

B counters or send 10c today for pkg. of 100 
and Free Samples to See and Try them. 

Engel Art Corners Mfg. Co., 

Depl < 5-C 4717 N. Clark ChicagoAO 111 



NEW WRITERS NEEDED 

New writers needed to re-write ideas CISCP 
in newspapers, magazines and books, rntt 
Splendid opportunity to “break into” 
fascinating writing field. May bring DETAILS 
you up to $5.00 per hour spare time. 

Experience unnecessary. Write today for FREE 
details. NO OBLIGATION. Postcard will do 
COMFORT WRITER'S SERVICE 
200-T42 South Seventh (1) St. Louis, Mo. 



Do You Want ■■ M ■ 

LONGER HA IP 

Justtrythis System ■ ■■ 

on your Hair 7 days " 

and see if vou are really enjoying the 
pleasure of Attractive Hair that so 
often captures Love and Romance. _ 

HAIR MAY GET LONGER 

When SCALP and HAIR conditions are , 

normal and the dry brittle, breaking off 
hair can be retarded it has a chance to get' 
i® n ^erand much more beautiful. Just try 
the JUELENE System 7 days and let your 1 
mirror prove results. Send $1.00 orC.O D 
plus postage. Fully guaranteed. Money 
back if you are not delighted. Write to 

IUEL CO., 1930 Irvine Park Rd.,Dept. -601, Chicago 13, IIL 


'pCUCtH<Zt(MCf 

MOVIE 

STARS 

PHOTOS 

?2 fan *t.°° 

Exciting high gloss j 
shots of your Holly¬ 
wood favorites in j 
fascinating poses. | 


pD pP Catalog with more than 600 miniature 
* £ £ photos with each order SPECIAL - 16 page 

"Pin-Up Paradise" catalog on request with each order. 

ALPHA PHOTO SERVICE ,VI 

























































MONEY BACK IF NOT SATISFIED! 


Send no money! We fill all C.O.D. orders in U.S.A. 
promptly. Or, if you prefer, enclose check, cash or 
money order for $5.40 plus 10c postage and save 
C.O.D. charges. In Missouri add 2 % sales tax. 

SALLE ANN, Dept. 250 

1409 Washington Ave., St. Louis 3, Mo. 

Send ... "Check - Mate" dress; $5.40 each plus 
10c postage. Ring your sixe: 12, 14, 16, 18. 

Check first and second color choice: 

□Red and white checks DGreen and white checks 
□Brown and white checks nBlue and white checks 

NAME---- 

ADDRESS---— 

CITY-— STATE- 


PICTURES IN PRODUCTION 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 341 


doing the acting. 

ARMY BRAT takes place in a pre¬ 
war military reservation, which will 
have Indians on it, probably, before 
Butch Jenkins gets through with his 
part. Frances Gifford and James Craig 
are Butch’s parents; Henry O’Neil 
and Sharon McManus are also in the 
cast. 

THREE WISE FOOLS puts a rare 
twist on an old theme. Usually, par¬ 
ents tell their children stories about 
leprechauns. In this picture, lepre¬ 
chauns tell their children about hu¬ 
man beings—and very funny they 
are, too! Bernhardt O’Brien is sur¬ 
rounded by a doting cast including 
Lionel Barrymore, Lewis Stone, Cyd 
Charisse, Edward Arnold, and Thomas 
Mitchell. 

AT 20TH CENTURY FOX: 

THREE LITTLE GIRLS IN BLUE 
is being shot in Technicolor with a 
good deal of fun and laughter. June 
Haver, Vivian Blaine, Victor Mature, 
Celeste Holm and Vera-Ellen are dis¬ 
porting themselves in this song and 

rlancp crippial 

THE SHOCKING MISS PILGRIM, 
also in Technicolor, actually deals 
with the invention of the typewriter 
—with Betty Grable involved; Dick 
Haymes, Coleen Gray, Margaret Ban- 
nerman, Anne Revere, Stanley Pra- 
ger, Susan Blanchard and Roy Roberts 
make up the rest of the cast now 
coming to the aid of their party. 

ANNA AND THE KING OF SIAM 
is a dramatization of the book of the 
same title, with Irene Dunne as the 
school teacher who brought Trafalgar 
Square viewpoints to the jungle. Rex 
Harrison is the King; this is Mr. 
Harrison’s first American film, al¬ 
though he is well known to American 
audiences for his work in “Night 
Train,” “Blithe Spirit,” and others. 
Linda Darnell, Gale Sondergaard, Lee 
J. Cobb, and Mikhail Rasumny round 
out the dramatis personae. 

BLACK BEAUTY is your childhood 
favorite revived with the horse 
“Black Beauty,” Mona Freeman, 
Richard Denning, Evelyn Ankers, 
Charles Evans, Moyna MacGill, Terry 
Kilburn, Clifford Brooke, J. M. Ker¬ 
rigan. 

SOMEWHERE IN THE NIGHT is 
the story of a service man who 
is released from a hospital, healed 
of his wounds, but without memory of 
his past, and bearing a name that 
seems to be unfamiliar to him. He un¬ 
ravels the pretzeled past to prove his 
identity in one of the mystery thrillers 
of the year. John Hodiak, Nancy Guild 
(in her first screen role after having 
stepped from the cover of LIFE to 
Hollywood), Lloyd Nolan, Richard 
Conte, Fritz Korfner, Sheldon Leon¬ 
ard, Josephine Hutchinson comprise 
the cast 

THE DARK CORNER gives Bill 
Bendix his first opportunity since 
“The Glass Key” to create the char¬ 
acterization of a thoroughly unre¬ 
generate citizen. Lucille Ball, Mark 
Stevens, Clifton Webb, Kurt Krueger, 
Reed Hadley, Eddie Heywood and 
Cathy Downs aid and abet the de¬ 
velopment of this thriller. 

CLUNY BROWN is the pictorial 
version of Margery Sharp’s delicious 
story of a scullery maid who finds 
romance in a most unexpected man¬ 


ner. Jennifer Jones, Charles Boyer, 
Helen Walker, Sir Aubrey Smith, 
Margaret Bannerman, Sara Allgood, 
Richard Haydn, Ernest Cossart, Una 
O’Connor, and Florence Bates are 
cast. 

AT UNITED ARTISTS: 

THE SIN OF HAROLD DIDDLE- 
BOCK, Preston Sturges vehicle in 
which Harold Lloyd returns to the 
screen is now in its third month of 
shooting. Working (and chuckling) 
with Mr. Lloyd are Frances Ramsden, 
Raymond Walburn, Rudy Vallee, Ed¬ 
gar Kennedy, Jimmy Conlin, Arline 
Judge, Lionel Stander, and Franklin 
Pangborn. 

ADVENTURE IN CASABLANCA 
will finish shortly now, so that leading 
lady Lisette Verea can go to New 
York to meet her fiance. Giving Miss 
Verea plenty of trouble on the set are 
the three Marx Brothers, Charles 
Drake, Lois Collier, Sig Ruman, Dan 
Seymour, Lewis Russell, Frederick 
Gearman, Harro Mellar, David Hoff¬ 
man and Paul Harvey. 

THE STRANGE WOMAN is the 
dramatization of Ben Ames Williams’ 
lusty novel and is a perfect vehicle 
for Hedy Lamarr’s return to the 
screen. George Sanders, Louis Hay¬ 
ward, Gene Lockhart, Hillary Brooke, 
and Kathleen Lockhart complete the 
cast. 

AT UNIVERSAL: 

CANYON PASSAGE, the rip-roar¬ 
ing western being made by Walter 
Wanger in Technicolor is now in its 
fourth month of production, making 
very busy people of Dana Andrews, 
Brian Donlevy, Susan Hayward, Pa¬ 
tricia Roc, Andy Devine, Hoagy Car¬ 
michael, Rose Hobart, Lloyd Bridges, 
Ray Collins, Ward Bond, Fay Holden, 
Dorothy Peterson, Harry Shannon, 
Ray Teal, Victor Cutler, Jimmy Au¬ 
brey, Walter Doering and Halliwell 
Hobbs. How’s that for a cast? 

GENIUS IN THE FAMILY is a 


Ben Hecht, Pulitier prixe and Academy 
Award winner, is producing, directing, 
writing "Specter Of The Rose' (Rep.). 


of lovely spring-weight 
rayon in tiny cheeks 
Check-mate for all your spring-time activities! 
You'll love the way the Eyelet and Schiffli em¬ 
broidery forms a becoming square-necked bod¬ 
ice! You'll dote on the Eyelet and Schiffli pockets 
that give your hips the flattering 1946 silhouette! 
You'll bless the wonderful zipper placket and set- 
in belt that pull your waistline into a mere shad¬ 
ow of its former self! And wait till you see the 
heavenly hues: red, green, brown, blue! 12 to 18* 


Salle Ann Shops, 1409 Washington, SL Louis 3, Mo. 

31 Shops ii Tills, Louisian, Missouri and Illinois 


EYELET AND SCHIFFLI 


EMBROIDERED DRESS 


89 














of my saving 


vt 


SosISau ^ 1 


pOUC» 




sue 


SSI 15 


only 


Costs 


DAY 


EACH 


ADULT 


1%B A DAY • EACH CHILD 
Benefits begin the day you enter a hospital 


FOR SICKNESS OR ACCIDENT 


Hospital Expenses paid, up to . . . . S540.00 
(beginning with the first day) 


FOR ACCIDENT 

Doctor Expense paid, up te .... $135.00 
loss of Wages reimbursed up to . . . $300.00 
Loss of Life by Accident.$1000.00 


WAR COVERAGE and EXTRA BENEFITS 

Childbirth Expense paid, up to ... $75.00 

Sickness or accident can easily wipe out, in a 
few weeks, savings it may have taken years to 
accumulate. Don't let this happen to you. With 
a Family Mutual Hospitalization policy, you’ll 
be able to pay your hospital bills. In case of 
accident, you will be reimbursed for your doctor 
expenses and for loss of time from work. You 
may choose any hospital in the United States 
and your own family doctor may attend you. 
Benefits applying to children are 50% of 
those paid adults. 

MAIL COUPON TODAY—No Agont Will Bother too 


FAMILY MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO.. WILMINGTON 99. DEL. 


comedy involving Myrna Loy, Don 
Ameche (who should be over on the 
other page helping to invent the 
typewriter), Richard Gaines, Bobby 
Driscoll, Sarah Padden, Clara Blan- 
dick, Molly Lamont, John Callaudet. 

LITTLE GIANT is another Abbott 
& Costello hijinks with Jacqueline 
DeWit, Elena Verdugo, Mary Gordon, 
George Cleveland. 

IDEA GIRL is a comedy starring 
Jess Barker, Julie Bishop, Alan Mow¬ 
bray, Joan Fulton, Laura Dean Dut¬ 
ton, Charlie Barnet and his orchestra. 

SHE WOLF OF LONDON is a 
screamer giving voice to Sara Haden, 
Una O’Connor, Jan Wiley, Forrester 
Harvey, and Dennis Hoey. 

AT WARNER’S 1ST NATIONAL: 

ESCAPE ME NEVER is the story of 
an elfin, impish wife and her dealings 
with a philandering husband. Errol 
Flynn, Ida Lupino, Eleanor Parker, 
Gig Young (his first picture since he 
shed Navy blue), Reginald Denny, 
Isobel Elsom and Albert Basserman 
make up the cast. 

THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS 
is a nightmare-hatcher: concerns a 
detached hand which is capable of 
murder. Holding hands for fear of 
being strangled are Robert Alda (a 
handy man, considering that his first 
picture Gershwinized him), Andrea 
King, Peter Lorre, J. Carrol Naish, 
Victor Francen and David Hoffman. 


Family Mutual Life Insurance Co. hw -12 

601 Shipley St., Wilmington 99, Del. 

Please send me, without obligation, complete informa¬ 
tion on pour Economical Hospitalization Plan. 

NAME_ 

ADDRESS_ 

CITY_STATE_ 


Thrill Your Friends With Your 



Favorite PHOTO or SNAPSHOT 

A thrilling,- new idea in personalization that has 
taken the country by storm. Your favorite photo 
reproduced on stamps—ready to paste on your 
letters, greeting cards, etc. Just imagine the thrill 
your friends and loved ones will get seeing YOU 
in every one of your letters. 


PERSONAL 

PHOTO 

STAMPS 

in your letters, 
greeting cards, etc. 


Use PHOTO 
STAMPS on— 
Stationery 
Greeting Cards 
Gift Cards 
Announcements 
Sheet Music 
Applications 
Match Books 
• 

As Bookplates 

• 

In Photo Albums 
Autograph Books 

• 

Exchange them 
With Pen Pals 


Many Other Clever Uses 

PHOTO STAMPS have many other uses 
.for personalization and identification. 
Large sized (l l /a" x 1 Vi") and printed on 
high gloss gummed stock—simply moisten 
the back and apply. Individually cut with 
smooth edge. Adheres smoothly and evenly 
to any surface, giving the appearance of 
having actually been printed on. 

SEND NO MONEY 

Yes, for only$l 89.you can have 250 per¬ 
sonal PHOTO STAMPS (minimum quan¬ 
tity). Send no money—just send photo (no 
negatives. When stamps arrive, pay post¬ 
man $ 1.89 plus C.O.D. postage. If cash 
accompanies order, we ship postpaid. 
Original photo returned iiyact. 

Money-Back Guarantee 


The PHOTOPLATE Co., Dept. ES3 

^161 W. Harrison St. Chicago 5, 111. ^ 


AT PARAMOUNT: 

MONSIEUR BEAUCAIRE is now in 
its third hilarious month with Bob 
Hope amid brocades and laces leering 
at Joan Caulfield whom you will see 
for the first time in Miss Susie 
Slagle's. By the time “Monsieur Beau- 
caire” comes along, you’ll be a Caul¬ 
field fan. Also rollicking through the 
script are Marjorie Reynolds, Hillary 
Brook, Patric Knowles, Joseph 
Schildkraut, Reginald Owen, Cecil 
Kellaway, Mary Nash, Constance 
Collier, Fortunio Bonanova and Yola 
D’Avril. 

STRANGE LOVE is the new label 
for LOVE LIES BLEEDING, which 
is still preferable to “Strange Love” 



Screen team Yvonne DeCarlo and Rod 
Cameron. He's wed to Janis Paige. 


su F r M ERS P 5 0 RIA SI s 


MAKE THE ONE A — 

SPOT® 

TEST » 


(SCALY SKIN TROUBLE 

DERmOIL 


Prove it yourself no matter 
how long you have suffered 
or what you have tried. 
^ Beautiful book on psoria¬ 
sis and Derm oil with 
amazing, true photo- 
>roof of results 
IE. Write for it. 



Don’t mistake eczema 
for the stubborn, ugly 
embarrassing scaly skin 
disease Psoriasis. Apply 
non-staining Derm oil. 

Thousands do for scaly 
spots on body or scalp. 

Grateful users, often after 
years of suffering, report 
the scales have gone, the 
red patches gradually disappeared and uu u* 

they enjoyed the thrill of a clear skin again. Dermoil 
is used by many doctors and is backed by a positive agree¬ 
ment to give definite benefit in 2 weeks or money Is re¬ 
funded without question. Send 10c (stamps or coin) for 
generous trial bottle to make our famous “One Spot Test ”. 
Test it yourself. Results may surprise you. Write today for 
your test bottle. Caution: Use only as directed. Print name 
plainly. Don’t delay. Sold by Liggett and Walgreen Drug 
Stores and other leading Druggists. LAKE LABORATORIES. 

547 Northwestern Station, Dept. 3530, Detroit 4, Mich. 




SAVE as never before! 

Genuine Fine-Cut 

DIAMONDS 


Not chips, bat genuine, 
fine-cut sparkling dia¬ 
monds poisedi n superbly 
styled 14 kt. solid gold 
settings! At amazingly 
low prices made possible 
only by our wholesale 
diamond connections. 
Diamond rings for women and men, $24 to $700 
Diamond wedding rings, $16.75 to $72.50. 

W rite today for FREE illustrated booklet 
BOND DIAMOND CO. Dept. HW 5 
562 Fifth Avenue, New York 19, N. Y. 


DIAMOND DEALERS SINCE 1881 


Women and Men, 18 to SO 

Many Swedish Massage graduates make $50. 
$7 5 or even more per Week. Large full time 
income from doctors, hospitals, sanatori- 
■ clubs or private practice. Others make 
good money in spare time. You can 
win independence and prepare for 
future security by training at 
home and qualifying for Diploma. 
Anatomy Charts and 32-page 
Illustrated Book FREE:—now! 

THE College of Swedish Massage 
Dpt. 641C, lOO E.Ohio St.,Chicago 11 


STAMMER 


I This new 128-page book, “Stammering, 
i Its Cause and Correction,” describes the 
J Bogue Unit Method for scientific 

■ correction of stammering and stut- 

■ tering — successful for 45 years. 
w Free — no obligation. 

Benjamin N. Bogue, Dept. 3376, Circle 
Tower, Indianapolis 4. Ind. 



LINCOLN AND INDIAN HEAD 

PENNIES WANTED 

W,LL S1A00 CAP II roR CERTAIN 
PAY *111" kHvll LINCOLN PENNIES 

Indian Head Cents 550.00: Nickels $500.00; Dimes 
$1,000.00. All rare coins, bills, stamps wanted. Send 
lOc for Illustrated Catalogue and other information. 

Federal Coin Exchange, 2-HWG, Columbus 5, Ohio 



gr&nce of 5 different expensive 
perfumes! FIVE generous sam¬ 
ple-size vials only 25c plus 5c t-a*. 
30c postpaid! Find the perfume 
which best enhances your person¬ 
ality. Or, SPECIAL I For $1 
(plus 20c tax) we send 4 sample 
sets (20 vials) and include FREE 
of extra charge, full-size bottle 
GOLDEN SHOWERS perfume! 
Money-back guarantee! 

H. U. RHODIUS 
203 Perfume Bldg. 

San Antonio 6, Texas 



PHOTOS 


MOVIE STARS 
PINUP GA 


5 for 50c 12 for $1 

SUPER, Genuine, glossy photos, 
size 3*2 x 5 V 2 , direct from Hol¬ 
lywood, of about 400 World- 
Famous Movie Stars. From 
the oldest and foremost fan 
photo studio. Send M.O. or 
U. S. stamps. Minimum order 
50c. FREE Star folder with 
first order. 

Immediate delivery, postpaid. Give second choice 

BRAM STUDIO (681) 

306 West 44th St. New York 18, N. Y. 




































in this reporter’s mind. However, 
some pollster decided that the word 
“Bleeding” was offensive to the thea¬ 
tre-going public. In the picture, re¬ 
gardless of title, Barbara Stanwyck 
plays one of the witchiest women in 
history. Van Johnson is reported to 
shine in his sinister part and others 
doing good work are Lizabeth Scott, 
Kirk Douglas, and Judith Anderson. 

LADIES’ MAN is the story of an 
Oklahoma farmer who is jilted one 
day and strikes oil. the next. With his 
fifty grand from the first gushing, he 
goes to New York where Eddie 
Bracken’s usual adventures cause 
audiences to bust gussets. Also cast 
are Cass Daley, Virginia Welles, Vir¬ 
ginia Field, Johnny Coy, Roberta 
Jonay, Spike Jones and His Band of 
Rhythmaniacs. 

CALIFORNIA is the Technicolor 
western for which Ray Milland has 
been wearing a suede frontier suit for 
months—breaking it in to the proper 
condition of crease, soil, and perspira¬ 
tion. Having less trouble with their 
wardrobe for the picture are Mr. 
Milland’s fellow players, Barbara 
Stanwyck, Barry Fitzgerald, George 
Coulouris, Albert Decker, and Frank 
Faylen. (Remember Frank Faylen’s 
supremely fine job as the sadistic 
male nurse in “Lost Weekend.”) 

BIG TOWN is in its first week of 
production under the aegis of Bill 
Pine and Bill Thomas, producers 
known around town as the Dollar 
Bills, because of the unceasingly good 
income from their pictures. BIG 
TOWN will prosper through the work 
of Philip Reed, Hillary Brooke, Rob¬ 
ert Lowery, Byron Barr and Veda 
Ann Borg. 

AT RKO: 

TILL THE END OF TIME is the 
new title for THEY DREAM OF 
HOME, and deals with the adjustment 
made by a war widow and a veteran. 
Dorothy McGuire, Guy Madison, Bob 
Mitchum, Bill Williams, William Gar- 
gan, Jean Porter (wasn’t she cute as 
the little French girl in “What Next, 
Private Hargrove?”), and Ruth Nel¬ 
son, are the Thespians. 

WITHOUT RESERVATIONS is the 
new title for THANKS GOD, I’LL 
TAKE IT FROM HERE, which was 
called lovingly in Hollywood, “Thanks 
God, I’ll Name It From Here.” With¬ 
out Reservations is a modern “It Hap¬ 
pened One Night.” It starts with 
Claudette Colbert getting put off the 
train, for lack of accommodations, at 


Answer to Puzzle on Page 18 



I killed my sweetheart’s LOVE 



Every night REAL STORIES FROM 
REAL LIFE brings you true dramatic incidents 
in the lives of real people . . . people 
like yourself who have the same problems, 
the same cares and heartaches, the same 
moments of great happiness. These real stories 
about real people are thrillingly complete 
—packed with the urgency of every day 
living. Listen to REAL STORIES FROM 
REAL LIFE tonight . . . and every weekday 
night ... on your local Mutual station. 


I HEAR ... 

Real Stories ■jl-zctu Real Life 

EVERY DRAMATIZATION A COMPLETE, FULL-LENGTH STORY 

Sponsored by Whitehall Pharmacal Co. 

MONDAY THRU FRIDAY NIGHTS . . . 9:15—9:30 E.S.T., 

YOUR MUTUAL STATION 


9 T 































































































To People 
who want to write 

but can’t get started 


Do you have that constant urge to write 
but the fear that a beginner hasn’t a chance ? 
Then listen to what the editor of Liberty 
said on this subject: 

“There is more room for newcomers In the writing 
field today than ever before. Some of the greatest 
of writing men and women have passed from the 
scene in recent years. Who will take their places? 
Who will be the new Robert W. Chambers. Edgar 
Wallace, Rudyard Kipling? Fame, riches and the 
happiness of achievement await the new men and 
women of power.” 


Beginner Earns $1,819 

“Today I received a check 
for $165 for a story. An¬ 
other I sold for $34. The 
other day I counted up just 
how much I made previous¬ 
ly. It amounted to $1,620. 
Not bad for a beginner, is 
it?—Mrs. L. L. Gray, 579 
E. McHarg Ave., Stamford, 
Tex. 



W riting A ptitude T est—FREE ! 

EWSPAPER Institute of America 
offers a free Writing Aptitude Test. 
Its object is to discover new recruits 
for the army of men and women who add 
to their income by fiction and article writ¬ 
ing. The Writing Aptitude Test is a simple 
but expert analysis of your latent ability, 
your powers of imagination, logic, etc. Not 
all applicants pass this test. Those who do 
are qualified to take the famous N. I. A. 
course based on the practical training given 
by big metropolitan dailies. 

This is the New York Copy Desk Method 
which teaches you to write by writing! You 
develop your individual style instead of try¬ 
ing to copy that of others. You “cover” 
actual assignments such as metropolitan re¬ 
porters get. Although you w T ork at home, 
on your own time, you are constantly guided 
by experienced writers. It is really fascinat¬ 
ing work. Each week you see new progress. 
In a matter of months you can acquire the 
coveted “professional” touch. Then you’re 
ready for market with greatly improved 
chances of making sales. 

Mail the Coupon ISoiv 

But the first step is to take the Writing 
Aptitude Test. It requires but a few minutes 
and costs nothing. "So mail the coupon now. 
Make the first move 
toward the most en¬ 
joyable and profitable 
occupation — writing 
for publication! News¬ 
paper Institute of 
America, One Park 
Ave., New York 16, 

N.Y. (Founded 1925) 


•• Newspaper Institute of America 

P One Park Ave., New York 16, N. Y. 

Send me, without cost or obligation, your Writing 
Aptitude Test and further information about writ¬ 
ing for profit as promised in Movieland, March. 


NOTICE TO 
CANADIANS 

Newspaper Institute's 
operations in Canada 
have been approved by 
the Foreign Exchange 
Control Board. To fa¬ 
cilitate all financial 
transactions, a special 
permit has been as¬ 
signed to their account 
with The Canadian 
Bank of Commerce, 
Montreal. 



Miss) 

Mrs.Y . 

Mr. ) 

Address ..,... 

(All correspondence confidential. No salesman will call 
on you.) 49-0666 


Copyright 1946, Newspaper Institute of America 


La Junta, Colorado. Laughing himself 
sick at this contretemps is John 
Wayne; and aiding and abetting the 
laughter are Don DeFore, Ann Triola 
(if you’ve been in Hollywood, you’ve 
heard her sing at The Bar of Music, 
and if you’ve been serving in the 
South Pacific, you probably heard her 
on one of her USO tours), Ruth 
Roman, Henry Johnson and Dick 
Dickerson. 

NOTORIOUS is the story of the 
Nazi underground activities in Brazil 
and the work of a German scientist 
trying to perfect an atomic bomb. 
Cary Grant enacts the part of an 
American agent, Ingrid Bergman is 
also an American agent, but poses 
as a Nazi. Claude Rains, Leopoldine 
Constantin, Louis Calhern, Lenore 
Ulric are also present. Most spine- 
tingling scene in the picture is that in 
which the two Americans are trapped 
in a wine cellar, knowing that they 
are to be caught momentarily. Nice 
Hitchcock suspense, as usual. 

SISTER KENNY is the story of the 
work of the far-famed Australian 
nurse. Rosalind Russell, Alexander 
Knox, and Dean Jagger are massag¬ 
ing the lines. 

SUNSET PASS is another westrun 
with James Warren, Nan Leslie, Jane 
Greer, and Robert Clarke. 

AT MONOGRAM: 

SUSPENSE is a story of murder on 
ice with Belita, Bonita Granville, 
Barry Sullivan, Albert Dekker, Bob¬ 
bie Ramos and his band. 

MOON OVER MONTANA once 
again disturbs all the little dogies and 
the lonesome cowboys in the persons 
of Jimmy Wakely, Lee White, Jack 
Ingram, Louise Arthur and Stanley 
Blystone. 

AT REPUBLIC: 

THE LAST CROOKED MILE is a 
murder mystery with Don Barry, Ann 
Savage, Tom Powers, Adele Mara, 
Nestor Paiva (the erstwhile villain 
from Los Angeles’ deathless “The 
Drunkard”), and Sheldon Leonard. 

GAY BLADES is now in its first 
month of production with Allan Lane, 
Jean Rogers, Robert Armstrong, Ann 
Gillis and Frank Albertson, who will 
probably be a parent again by the 
time you read this. 

AT COLUMBIA: 

THE AL JOLSON STORY in Tech¬ 
nicolor is the story of the Mammy 
Man with Larry Parks as Jolson. 
Great things are expected of Larry 
in his first big part. Evelyn Keyes, 
William Demarest (who has visited 
more boys in more government 
hospitals than almost anyone in Hol¬ 
lywood), Edgar Buchanan, Bill Good¬ 
win and Scotty Beckett are also in 
the cast. 

DUCHESS OF BROADWAY is 
probably the last picture Jinx Fal- 
kenburg will make for sometime, so 
better catch it. Jinx wants to live in 
the East to be near her husband, 
Tex McCrary. Joe Besser, Trudy 
Marshall and Forrest Tucker are 
working in this picture also. 

MURDER IS UNPREDICTABLE is 
another in The Whistler series with 
Richard Dix, Barton MacLane, Regis 
Toomey, Mike Mazurki, and Pamela 
Blake—and very good it promises to 
be. 

THE END 



from your fa¬ 
vorite picture, print, negative, 
or snapshot, they’re gorgeously 
hand-colored, mounted on wood- 
base and carved from wood with 
a three-dimensional colorful real- 
life effect! 7^ inches tall. Per¬ 
manent, easily cleaned with 

_ damp cloth. Ideal for those 

in Service, or Mother, Father, Sister, Brother. Only 
$1.00 postpaid for picture of ONE person, pet or object. 
For each additional person add 10c each. For example: 
Statuette of two persons costs $1.10; three persons, $1.20, 
etc. Send money TODAY with picture or negative and 
coloring instructions. Or order C.O.D. Pay mailman. 
Fast service! MONEY-BACK guarantee! Supply lim¬ 
ited. Order NOW! A perfect gift for those in Service 
or the folks at home. 

AMERICAN STUDIOS 

Dept. 281-S LA CROSSE, WISCONSIN 



NEW 


TINY POCKET SIZE 

RADIO! 


y S oza.l Complete READY TO 
PLAY as shown with self contained 
phone for personal use. Beautiful black 
silver plastic case. Has patented fixed 
Crystal-Slide Tuning Dial! NO TUBES, 
BATTERIES. OR ELECTRIC PLUG 
IN REQUIRED. USUALLY RE¬ 
CEIVES LOCAL BROADCASTS with¬ 
out outside aerial wires. 

GUARANTEED TO WORK 

when connected and used according to 
instructions. Can be used in homea. 
offices, hotels, cabins, in* bed after hours, etc. 

Cpnri Onlv Cl00 (cash, money order, check) and pay post- 
OCIIU man $2.99 plus delivery fees on arrival or 

send $3.99 for postpaid delivery. IDEAL GIFT FOR CHILDREN 
OR ADULTS ALIKE! Get your PA-KETTE RADIO NOW for 
real enjoyment. Dealers in most cities. 

Pa-Kette Electric Co., Dept. HW-3, Kearney, Nebraska 


WOMEHj 

nunt&i] 

With Form 

Tailored 

UH«W*J 


Women go wild about “Form-Tailored” 
Lingerie—new, glamorous styling, new 
kina of fitting, high quality workman¬ 
ship. Low prices bring quick orders. 
Also fine hosiery, girdles and underwear 
for the whole family. If you want 
money, full or spare time, write today 
for complete, beautiful, illustrated 
Style Equipment—sent ABSOLUTELY 
FREE. 

WORLD’S STAR-MALLOCH 
Dept. P-14 Grand Rapids, Mich. 



FOR LADIES AND MEN Price PI no 

Your Name Engraved—FREE only 

Handsome and sturdy. A sporty bracelet you’ll enjoy wearing 
and be proud to own. Skillfully made—a gleaming, ultra-smart 
creation. Wide curved name plate, strong link chain. Must 
be seen to he appreciated. Silver Plated. 

T, „ S ? ND NO MONEY — 10 DAY TRIAL 

Wear 10 dayB on our Money Back Guarantee. Send name 
you want engraved. Pay postman only $1.98 plus postage 
and tax on arrival. You’ll be delighted! 


International Diamond Co., 2435 Indiana, Dept. 452, Chicago 16, IIL 


p* eT 7 LEGS 


BEAUTIFY CONTOURS, | 
EASILY, QUICKLY! I 

New, lovely proportions for your J 
legs: tups,thighs, calves, ankles, ■ 
\ etc.—in this healthful, new, as- J 

tonishingly easy way. Only a few J 
m ' nules f>er day your own home. * 
\\ ■ EFFECTIVE. LASTING RESULTS' [ 

I Used successfully by hundreds I 

I of smart women everywhere. I 

WRITE FOR FREE LITERATURE TODAY! 

I Surprise everyone: get started now, without obUgation, j 
I by mailing coupon immediately to ( 

ADRIENNE 

1 915 SHREVE BLDG .Salon Q,SAN FRANCISCO,8, CAL 1 

I NAME..._ ' 

J ADDRESS... ." , 

■ CITY ...STATE.. ■ 







































Continued from 
page 10 



Bob Sterling is out of uniform ond back at 
MGM. Mrs. S. is Ann Sothern, alias "Maisie." 

“I'll probably bungle this scene; that aisle 
looks a million miles long." However, the 
double ring ceremony went smoothly; so did 
the cutting of the 3-tier wedding cake; and 
so did the trip to Mexico City, followed by a 
vacation at "Butternut," Bette's New England 
sanctuary. 

Type casting note: Boris Karloff has been 
sued by his wife for divorce. Grounds: 
cruelty. And did you know that the cultured 
and intellectual bogie-man is legally known 
as William Henry Pratt? 

DONE IN OIL: 

Jane Wyman is posing, dressed in her 
costume for the part of Ma Baxter in Mar¬ 
jorie Kinnan Rawlings' ''The Yearling," for 
famed portraitist Paul Clemens. When hung 


in the Reagan living room, this oil will be the 
only Hollywood study of a star as she ap¬ 
pears in the most austere role of her career, 
and it demonstrates how serious Jane is about 
concentrating on drama hereafter. 

DUAL ROLE: 

As you probably know, Joan Bennett is 
secretary-treasurer of her own producing com¬ 
pany, "Diana Productions." Not long ago it 
became necessary to hold a directors' meet¬ 
ing (Fritz Lang is president of the corporation, 
and Walter Wanger is vice-president) on a 
day when Miss Stephanie Wanger's nurse 
was away on vacation. As a result, Joan 
took minutes of the meeting, while holding 
her sleeping daughter on her lap. Observed 
Mr. Wanger, "This is the first time I have 
ever seen a motion picture executive who 
was capable of solving two problems at 


REQUEST PERFORMANCE: 

Have you heard the Sunday Night show, 
sponsored by Campbell's Soup, which seeks 
to supply to fans the antics of their choice 
performed by favorite actors? Called "Re¬ 
quest Performance" it has so far featured 
Rita Hayworth reading the telephone direc¬ 
tory to prove that a real artist is capable of 
rising above the script; and Kay Kyser tap 
dancing to prove that he is agile of limb as 
well as nimble of musical knowledge. 

During Christmas season, the requests were 
mainly for 1) Readings from the Bible, 2) 
Carols sung by anybody. 3) Bing & "White 
Christmas." Only request that will positively 
NOT be fulfilled is that of an ambitious Texan 
who wanted to hear Charlie McCarthy and 
Mortimer Snerd singing a duet. 

TEAPOT TEMPEST: 

Ernestine Tibbett, wife of Lawrence Tib- 
bett, Jr., went to Las Vegas for the usual 




THE 

jumper d,e . s .‘"“ost of Y 00 '.^ulUNG-Slashed 
set-in festive 

with --"gUf ,0 ^°.Un1dufe-f ™ 


Oabatelaay. cre ase - tesis’u 

- the permanen w ul delight 

process. Its Melon ** 1 ' PlU S POSTAGE 

you! Chaose be ';* a .„ sUe s 10-18. 
lime, Aq m C .0.0. (01 SM ^ 

chartes 25c mailing 

*20 ** ' w ' Gl j wt otuvow 

y0 C RS ATtSTACTt0H«^ oD 

HOLLWOOD MAID, Dept. 300 

6546 HOLLYWOOD BLVD., HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIF. _ 

Please send MOVIE-LAND Jumper at *7 95 I 

(Mark 1 st and 2 nd choice of color) fits postiji 

MELON RED □ LIME □ BLACK □ AQUA □ ■ 
Size: 10 12 14 16 18 (Circle size wanted) | 

(Please print name, etc. plainly) 

Name____ B 


The newsiest couple in town: Clark Gable was dating pretty movie actress, Virginia Grey, 
for all the tennis matches recently held at the L. A. Club. Above, with Lee Bowman. 



-Zone. 


State 


93 

















DON'T RISK PAYING 

HOSPITAL end DOCTOR BILLS 

ALL BY YOURSELF! 




HOSPITALIZATION 

---1 INSURANCE 


Policy Pays Up To 

*6 00 Day H080 00 
(HOSPITAL 

Pays actual expense for 
Hospital up to a Maximum 
Benefit of $6.00 a day for 
Room, Board, General Nurs¬ 
ing for each insured adult. 
Includes up to 90 days per 
policy year for Accident and 
up to 90 days per policy year 
for Sickness. 

$25 Each Full Week ft 

LOSS of TIME *oUU 

By Accident for Employed 
Persons, up to 12 weeks. 

DOCTO 

EXPENSES 
Maximum benefit, $3.00 per 
visit, for attendance by a 
Doctor up to 46 visits, 
while in Hospital due to 
injuries. 

$ 1000.00 

Accidental Loss of Life or 
Both Eyes, Hands or Feet. 
Many other liberal benefits. 
All Indemnify Subject 
To Limitations and Ex¬ 
clusions Contained In 
The Policy 


"*135 00 


Don’t go into debt when 
Sickness or Accident 
strikes. Be prepared—pro¬ 
tect yourself NOW! This de¬ 
pendable Hospital Expense 
Policy PAYS BENEFITS 
FOR ONE DAY OR MORE 
of Hospitalization, exactly 
as provided. In addition to 
Hospital and Doctor Bene¬ 
fits, employed persons re¬ 
ceive a CASH BENEFIT 
for LOSS of TIME from 
work, while in Hospital due 
to accident disability. Any 
lawfully operated Hospital 
and any Physician or Sur¬ 
geon may be selected by 
you. Benefits reduced after 
age 60. Policy pays half 
benefits for Children under 
18 and cost is reduced to 
half of the Adult premium 
rate. Policy issued to In¬ 
dividual or Family. No red tape — no obligation 
— just mail the coupon. Do it NOW! 


GEORGE ROGERS CLARK 
MUTUAL CASUALTY COMPANY 
3319 Insurance Exchange Bldg., Rockford, III. 
||-MAIL COUPON NOW-] 

I George Rogers Clark Mutual Casualty Co. 

3319 Insurance Exchange Bldg., Rockford, III. | 

Please mail FREE information about I 

j Hospitalization Insurance Plan Policy. 

| NAME. I 

|| ADDRESS. | 

I CITY & STATE. I 

I_(Zone, if any)_J 





DEFORMED OR 
INJURED BACK 

Thousands of 
Remarkable Cases 

A Man, helpless, unable 
to walk, because of a 
spinal injury, was, 
through support of the 
Philo Burt Appliance, 
riding horseback and 
playing tennis, within a 
year. A Lady, 72 years 
old, who suffered a se¬ 
vere spinal disorder, 
found relief. A Child, 
paralyzed from a spinal 
deformity was able to 
play about the house 
in three weeks’ time. 

The Philo Burt Appliance has been successfully used 
In ever sixty-eight thousand cases in the past 43 years. 

30 DAYS’ TRIAL TO PROVE 
ITS VALUE IN YOUR OWN CASE 

The Appliance is light, cool, flexible 
and easily adjusted—how different 
from the old torturing plaster easts, 
leather and celluloid jackets or steel 
braces. Every sufferer with a weak¬ 
ened, injured, diseased 
or deformed spine owes 
it to himself to in¬ 
vestigate. Physicians 
recommend it and we 
work with your Doctor. 
Reduced price within 
reach of all afflicted. 
Send for descriptive book 

Describe your case so 
we can give you definite 
information. 

PHILO BURT CO.. 
53-3 Odd Fellows Temple 
Jamestown, New York 


reason, abruptly returned to Los Angeles, 
made certain arrangements, then returned to 
Las Vegas. This conduct deeply interested 
local collectors of items of human interest. 
The lowdown: Upon advice of his mother, 
Mr. Tibbett refused to sign the divorce com¬ 
plaint, allowing an uncontested suit to be 
filed, until Mrs. Tibbett agreed to divide the 
wedding gifts. Seems that there was a 
handsome sterling silver tea service which 
was the principal object of contention. Mrs. 
Tibbett, Jr., having come from a social family 
of means, had made no demand for court 
costs nor alimony. Still behaving in excellent 
taste, she relinquished to the bridegroom 
certain of their wedding gifts. 

EMOTIONAL EQUITY: 

Foreword: According to California law, a 
white slip giving vital statistics about the 
ownership of an automobile is posted in the 
vehicle; however, the legal evidence of 
ownership is a pink slip which, when trans- 
fered from one person to another, serves as 
title. Apropos. • • . 

When charming Edna Skelton and Holly¬ 
wood's favorite director, Frank Borzage, were 
married in Las Vegas, the officiating clergy¬ 
man glanced at the record on which Frank 
and Edna had inscribed their names. To 
Mr. Borzage the minister said, "And how does 
one pronounce your name, please?" 

"To rhyme with 'plaguey'," was the 
chuckling answer. 

With a flourish, the pastor handed Edna 
her marriage certificate and observed, "There 
you are, Mrs. Borzage—your pink slip." 

THE CONDITIONS THAT EXIST: 

Wayne Morris, recently discharged from 
the service, was rocketing around Holly¬ 
wood with his pretty wife, renewing old 
acquaintances. Someone asked him how he 
found the civilian clothing situation. Baring 
his shirt front, he exhibited a large "J. W." on 
the pocket and grinned, "The only way a 
guy as hefty as I am can get back into 
civvies is by knowing an equally big moose, 
and borrowing his clothes. John Wayne has 
loaned me six shirts." 


ROOM WITH A VIEW: 

Mention of Lloyd C. Douglas brings up the 
news that he has sold his home in Beverly 



Walter Slezak is "Cornered" with his wife. 



Stunning Eyelashes 


spell Attraction, Romance 

Don’t let your eyes appear dull, drab, unattractive . . . 
rob you of popularity. Improve their beauty with LA- 
SHEEN, the new discovery that adds glorious, exciting 
allurement in just a few seconds. LASHEEN is not a 
mascara, but a scientific waterproof formula specially 
prepared to promote graceful, luxuriant eyelashes. Just 
apply LASHEEN on your own eyelashes . . . you can 
practically see them grow silkier, softer, more appealing 
. . . see them sparkle with tantalizing new charm. Your 
choice of black, brown, or neutral. State shade desired. 
Full year's supply, including Federal Tax and postage only 
$2.00 (If C.O.D., $2.35.) No C O.D. to Canada. Order 
LASHEEN today—now—on our money-back guarantee. 
LASHEEN, 220 Broadway. Dept. B-3, New York 7, N. Y. 


BE A HOTEL 
HOSTESS 


Enjoy Your Work! Fascinating Posi¬ 
tions in hotels as Hostess, Executive 
Housekeeper, Manager, Social or 
Food Director. Grade school education plus Lewis 
Training qualifies you. Lewis National Placement Serv¬ 
ice Free of extra charge. One student writes: “Offered 
three positions by Lewis School, I selected this one as 
Hostess-Assistant Manager of a famous resort.” Write 
for Free Book. 

LEWIS HOTEL TRAINING SCHOOL 

Sta. HC-9301, Washington 7, D. C. 



30 : 


SUCCESSFUL 

TEAR 


^$MONEY$ MONEY 


YOUR SPARE TIME 

^It seasy to make $ $$ calling on friends with Every¬ 
day Greeting Cards for Birthdays, Anniversaries, 
Get Well,” etc. 16 stunning folders sell for $1. 
NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED to make YEAR 
'ROUND EXTRA INCOME. Start earning 
iat once. Send 60c for SPECIAL SAMPLE 
OFFER worth $1.00 or write for details NOW! 
ARTISTIC CARD COMPANY 

319 WAY STREET, ELMIRA, NEW YORK 



FEET 


RT? 


TRY DR. BARRON’S NEW FOOT CUSHION 

Do you suffer from metatarsal callouses, corns. 

I weak arch foot pains? Try Dr. Barron’s New 
Foot Cushions. LIKE WALKING ON A PIL- 
LOW! Soft, Spongy, Air-ventilated. Fits all 
shoes. Cushions your arches and feet from heel 
to toes. Dr. Barron says: “Wonderful for 
tired, aching feet!" Send only $1.98 for A 
PAIR, oi C.O.'D. plus postage. State shoe size 
and if man or woman. 30-DAY TRIAL 
GUARANTEE. Money back if no blessed teller. 
ORTHO CO., 111 W. 83 ST. Dept.37-C N.Y.C.24 

Free for Asthma 

During Winter 

If you suffer with those terrible attacks of Asthma 
when it is cold and damp; if raw, Wintry winds 
make you choke as if each gasp for breath was the 
very last; if restful sleep is impossible because of 
the struggle to breathe; if you feel the disease is 
slowly wearing your life away, don’t fail to send 
at once to the Frontier Asthma Co. for a free 
trial of a remarkable method. No matter where 
you live or whether you have any faith in any 
remedy under the Sun, send for this free trial If 
vou have suffered for a lifetime and tried every¬ 
thing you could learn of without relief; even if you 
are utterly discouraged, do not abandon hope but 
send today for this free trial. It will cost you 
nothing. Address * 

Frontier Asthma Co. 868-S Frontier Bldg. 
462 Niagara Street, Buffalo 1, New York 



Here s an opportunity to 
get the loveliest, most 
exciting ENLARGE- 
iviENT you’ve ever seen 
of your favorite snap¬ 
shot. Created by ex¬ 
perts, this real profes- 
f' 0 " 3 , 1 Enlargement will 
thrill you and give you 
a ,, t r9e Picture that 
you’ll treasure all your 


SEND NO MONEY 


*7^?T SERVICE. Mail ANY SIZE snapshot, photo, or negative 
of loved one in service, or at home. pets, outdoor scenes, groups. 
We II create professionally beautiful big 8x10 ENLARGEMENT 
on heavy portrait quality paper. Guaranteed fadeless. Pav postman 
69c for one or $1.00 for two. plus postage. Or send nrice and we'll nav 
postage. YOUR PHOTO RETURNED UNHARMED WITH 
ENLARGEMENT. Nothin* else to buy. Mail photo NOW for thi 
most beautiful and exciting Enlargement vou’ve ever seen 

ALLIED PHOTO CO. 

108 W. Lake St., Dept, B-2, Chicago, III. 


m 


94 




















































Hills and moved to Las Vegas where his 
arthritis is much benefited by the climate. 
However, in the Beverly Hills home there was 
a magnificent view window that Mr. Douglas 
couldn't bring himself to part from, so he had 
it extracted from its casement, shipped to Las 
Vegas, and installed in his new home. 

FROM THE MAIL BOX: 

"Dear Miss Dudley: Please publish a para¬ 
graph suggesting Anna Lee for the role of 

1 either Lucia or Diana in Lloyd C. Douglas' 
great book 'The Robe.' Also try to interest 
RKO in producing 'Emma' by Jane Austin 
with Miss Lee in the title role. Yours truly— 
Bill Birtles, Alexander, Manitoba, Canada." 

A LADD IN A MILLION: 

When Diane Marlowe's husband came 
home from overseas, her employer rented a 
beach house for two weeks in which she 
could have a second honeymoon with her 
dream boat. This employer also furnished all 
food and a spectacular cook to prepare same 
during the two weeks. 

The employer? Alan Ladd—who certainly 
knows how to keep a good secretary happy. 


THE WRITING PUBLIC: 

In discussing a scene to be shot for "Scar¬ 
let Street" the Robinson-Bennett-Duryea 
thriller being made at Universal (a studio 
which is astonished at some of the things 
allowed to remain uncensored in the finished 
version) Joan Bennett said, "If I don't turn 
off the light when I leave the house. I'll get 
hundreds of letters saying I'm setting a bad 
example for young people. Let's shoot it 
with me carefully turning out the light." 

Seems that in "Woman In The Window" 
she brushed her teeth and didn't roll up the 
toothpaste tube after squeezing. She received 
dozens of letters from annoyed parents about 
that type of carelessness. In the same pic¬ 
ture, Edward G. Robinson tossed a coat on a 
chair instead of hanging it in a closet, and 
that bit of action also inspired hundreds of 
letters from irate and admonition-weary 
mothers. 

In Hollywood a new slogan has been 
coined as a result: "You can get away with 
murder, but mind your manners." 

RETURNED—FILLED: 

Not long ago Jack Carson answered the 
door bell to find the Railway Express driver 
offering a battered, faded suitcase. "Must 
be some mistake," said Jack However, it 
was addressed to Jack, the charges were 
paid, and no ticking sound emanated from 
within, so Jack accepted it. "It's heavy 
enough to be a dismantled jeep," quoth Mr. 
Carson. 

Investigation revealed a note from George 
W. Gibson, resident of Peoria, Illinois, and 
quondam landlord for Mr. Carson. It read: 
"I was cleaning the attic and found your 
valise which gave my wife and me a big 
laugh. I am returning it to you just as you 
left it, in lieu of rent—filled with telephone 
booksj" 

STATIC: 

At the Betty Grable-Dick Haymes-Angie 
Blue-Artie Robinson table in the 20th Com¬ 
missary (a spot noted for noise and laughter) 
the lunchers were discussing the likelihood 
of motion picture people going in avidly for 
short wave radio work now that the ban is 
off and sets are available. Said Dick, "I 
doubt there will be much activity. Can you 
imagine an actor unblushingly applying for 
a ham license?" 






Marion Nixon (remember her?) and husband Bill Seiter. 


He directed "Little Giant." 






Bewitching little darling 
of Spotlight attractive- 

ness that turns male heads. Lasting loveliness 
in girlishly slim pleat skirt, accenting the new 
"narrow" look and high-lighting a novel NAIL- 
HEAD belt trim. Crease resistant, long wear¬ 
ing Rayon Romaine, in Cinnamon, Blue-gray, 
Melon, Lime, White and Maize. Sizes 9 to 17. 
$7.98 plus handling and mailing costs. 
BLOUSE with heart throb appeal. Royal 
Luana Cloth in White, Maize, Green and 
Baby Pink. $3.98 plus handling and mailing 
costs. 

(Clin tin kinucvkst mail coupon and pay 
OtNU nU mUNCI postman on arrival. Ten 
Days’ Examination privilege fmoney refunded if not de¬ 
lighted). Order by mail from Janne of Hollywood for 
guaranteed satisfaction. 


SEND DIRECT TO HQLLYWOOJE7 

spotUGHT 
JUMPER 


JANNE OF HOLLYWOOD 

Dept. 112-S 

5071 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, California 
Please send "Spotlight" Jumper. 

□ Cinnamon □ Blue-gray Melon □ Lime 

□ Maize □ White (give 2 choices) 

Size 9, 11,13, 15, 17 (circle size) 

Send Blouse 

□ White O Maize □ Green □ Pink 

Size 32, 34, 36, 38 (circle size) 


Name... 
Address. 
City.... 


.State. 


95 



















96 



Fascinating occupation and hobby 
learned by average man or wo¬ 
man who is artistically inclined, 
in spare time at home. Easv-to- 
understand oil coloring method 
makes it possible to bring out 
natural. life - 1 ike colors. 
Many earn while learning. ^ 


Easv to Learn . •. our practical 

7 1 W “" W W ' ■■ • • • instruction shows 
you how to do beautiful work. No previous train¬ 
ing is needed, nor is it necessary to do any 
drawing or sketching. Find out how those with nat¬ 
ural talent can be trained to color their own photo¬ 
graphs and those of their friends and, when ex¬ 
perienced. seek work for studios, stores and others. 

National Method Means Beautiful Work 

Learn the “National Method" of coloring photographs 
and miniatures in oil. It brings out beautiful effects. 
Originated in a well-known Studio that for many 
years catered to the Gold Coast residents of Chicago. 
This type of instruction trains you in the late, 
modem method of coloring in vogue today. 


FREE Booklet 


If you seek increased independence, 
greater happiness, and a worth-w r hile 
nobby, and you feel you have artistic 
talent write for this FREE booklet. 
Find out more about this fascinating 
work and the opportunities in a com- 

F >aratively uncrowded field. Send today 
or free booklet. “A Fascinating 
Hobby" and full particulars. Sent post¬ 
age prepaid, without obligation. 
National Photo Coloring School 
Dept. 1863 

1315 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago 5, III. 


Thrills. ..Fun... Barn... 

eoiome photos 

AT HOME 


NATIONAL PHOTO COLORING SCHOOL 
1315 So. Michigan Ave., Dept. 1863, Chicago 5. III. 
Please send me, without obligation, your FREE 
booklet “A Fascinating Hobby" and full particulars. 


Name 


Address 


City 


Zone. State. 



MATERNITY 

STYLE BOOK 

FREE 


LANE BRYANT 
Maternity clothes enable 
you to dress stylishly 
during all stages of your 
maternity period—and 
after baby comes as well. 

Designed to conceal your 
condition and to provide 
ample room for expansion. 

Latest styles in Dresses and 
Corsets. Also apparel for 
baby. Send the coupon today 
for your FREE Book. 


<yCa/ne/pry ant 

DEPT. 28-C • 752 E. MARKET ST. 
INDIANAPOLIS 17, IND. 


Mail FREE Maternity Style Book in plain wrapper. 
(28-C) 

Name . 


Address 


^ Town ... State . 



Everybody wants these charming messages for 
Birthdays, Anniversaries, Get-Well and Sym¬ 
pathy occasions. Sell Assortment of 14 beauteous 
* folders for $1. Y oumake up to 50c per box. 

Make Big Money Easy! 

No experience needed. Call on friends, 
others. Samples bring quick sales, easy 
sb daily. Send 65c for Sample Every¬ 
day Box. Money back if not satisfied. 

CHILTON GREETINGS 

147 ESSEX STREET 

Dept. 100-S, Boston 11, Mass. 



NEW PICTURE GUIDE 

[CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20) 


THE NOTORIOUS LONE WOLF (Colum¬ 
bia) —Finding the Shalimar sapphire 
is the incentive for a cops and robbers 
chase indulged in by Gerald Mohr, 
Janis Carter, Eric Blore and Don 
Beddoe. Blore (with bowler) is a 
butler once again. He helps find the 
missing jewel—and brightens the dull 
moments with his grimaces. 

TOKYO ROSE(Pa r amount) —Produced by 
those dollar Bills, Pine and Thomas, 
this “mellerdrama” weaves itself 
around the celebrated and no longer 
mysterious broadcaster, Tokyo Rose 
(Lotus Long). Byron Barr is the 
American soldier captured by the 
Japs, who tries to kidnap the Orien¬ 
tal menace. Osa Massen, Don Doug¬ 
las, Richard Loo and Keye Luke make 
up the mixed cast. 

THE SHADOW RETURNS (Monogram)— 

and just in time, too! Discovery that 
a grave has been opened and jewels 
are missing sends Lamont Cranston 
(Kane Richmond) hunting for a 
character who uses a bull whip to drag 
his victims to their death. Barbara 
Hale, Tom Dugan and Joe Crehan 
help the^Shadow solve this mystery. 

THE FACE OF MARBLE (Monogram)— 

Scientist John Carradine manages to 
upset his quiet life by discovering 
how to restore life. The formula lacks 
one important fact, however, and his 
revived victims return from the dead 
as crazed zombies. Assistant David 
Cochran and Maris Wrixon find time 
for woo when not eluding un-dead 
characters. 

ON THE CARPET (Unlvarsal) bags the 
talents of Abbott and Costello in a 
vacuum cleaning epic of mild propor¬ 
tions. From Cucamonga comes Benny 
Miller (Lou Costello) seeking a for¬ 
tune as salesman for the Hercules 
Vacuum Cleaner Co. in Los Angeles. 
Assisting with the chores and dust 
collecting are Jacqueline De Wit, 
Elena Verdugo (where did she get 
that name?), Mary Gordon and 
George. Cleveland. 

(Continued on page 98) 



Bob Stanton and Osa Massen take the leads 
in Columbia's "The Gentleman Misbehaves." 



ENLARGEMENT 


8xK> inches 
like this 


TakeAdvantage: 
of this 

ASTOUNDING 
get acquainted 
offer 

To show you 
quality of our 
photo enlarging 
and give you 
photo coloring 
details, we will beautifully enlarge your favorite 
print or negative, photo or picture to 8x10 inches 
—FREE—if you enclose this ad. (Pictures should 
be clear and sharp; negatives give best results). 
Information on hand tinting in natural colors 
sent immediately. Your original returned with 
your free enlargement. Send today. Limit 1 to 
a customer. Good only in United States. 

Geppert Studios Dept.A-321 .Des Moines, fowo 



LEARN 

MILLINERY 

AT HOME 

Design and make exclusive hats 
under personal direction of one 
of America’s noted designers. 
Complete materials, blocks, etc., furnished. Every 
step illustrated. You make exclusive salable hats 
right from the start. We teach vou how to start a 
profitable business in spare time. Low cost and easy 
terms. Expert milliners are in demand. Free 
National Placement Dept. Send for free catalog. 

LOUIE MILLER SCHOOL OF MILLINERY 
225 N. Wabash Ave.. Dept. 43, Chicago I, III. 



Hollywood BEAD-CATCHERS 


Only $1.50 
Postpaid 


Watch the expression on 
your friends faces when 
you wear these exotic, 
gaily colored Sequined 
Horse Hair Earrings with 
Plastic back. They are 
the talk of Hollywood. 

Made in 6 colors. Aqua, 

Powder, Red, Black, 

White and Yellow. Priced 
unbelievably low — only 
$1.50 postpaid. If not de¬ 
lighted, return within 5 
days and full refund will be made. Order your favorite 
color today for yourself or as a gift. 

Unique Accessories. Dept. A-10, 4618 Hollywood Blvd. 

Hollywood 27, Calif. 




MORNING COUGHS 

Why start the day with hawking, “morning cougha" 
doe to nose and throat congestion caused by colds, 
■inns, and catarrh? Try this “old stand-by meth¬ 
od" that thousands for 69 years have used . .. 

HALL’S TWO METHOD TREATMENT. 

Loosens and helps clear op phlegm-filled throat and 
nasal congestion or money back. Ask your druggist. 
Write for FREE Vitamin and Health Chart today! 
W. J. Cheney & Co., Dept.63. Toledo, Ohio. 


SHORTHAND in 

Weeks at Home 


_ Famous Speedwriting system. No signs 

or symbols; uses ABC’s. Easy to learn; 
easy to write and transcribe. Fast preparation for a 
job. Surprisingly low cost. 100,000 taught by mail. 
Used in leading offices and Civil Service. Write for 
free booklet. 




\ EARN 
! MONEY 

SHOWING i 


R 

1 

C SAMPLt 
C FABRICS 


1 Write me, and I’ll send you this big package of 
actual sample fabrics and styles ABSOLUTELY 


dresses —lovely lingerie — hosiery-— 
men’s shirts and socks—all at LOW 
PRICES. Take orders from friends 
and make money in spare time* 
Get FREE Samples! Send no 
money for this big-profit 
line of sample fabrics and 
styles. It’s yours, ABSO- 
LUTELYFREE. Rushnarnd 
and address now. 

THE MELVILLE CO., Dept. 4105, CINCINNATI 3, OHIO 

aims* 

UICKLY f EASIi 




QUICKLY,EASILY 
AT HOME 

Splendid income, new social contacts, and the 
satisfaction of serving humanity can be yours 
as a TRAINED PRACTICAL NURSE. Ages 18 

n Welcomed 
’ earn while 

_ -- -- — Guidance in¬ 

cluded. EASY PAYMENT PLAN. Write now for facts and 
fascinating FREE sample lesson pages. 

WAYNE SCHOOL OF PRACTICAL NURSING, INC. 

2301 N. Wayne Ave*. Dept. AB-10Chicago 14, Illinois 



















































DREAM BOY 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 481 


“Looks like you’re carrying your 
full tonnage,” he said. 

“Oh, that . . smiled the pretty 
redhead, “somebody can sit on some¬ 
body, or something . . 

But the blonde guy wasn’t the kind 
to ?j*owd people, not intentionally—, 
although before too long now, he will 
be packing them in at the theaters. 
The Guy’s name was Guy Madison, 
which is—or isn’t—important, accord¬ 
ing to which side of the population 
you belong. Because, since the release 
of “Since You Went Away,” there 
have been only two kind of citizens: 
Those who didn’t see the picture, or 
those who saw it, and can’t forget the 
kid in bell-bottomed britches who 
walked away with the bowling-alley 
scene. 

To be specific, he’s the fellow who 
did one scene in competition with 
Jennifer Jones and Bob Walker—the 
picture was additionally star-studded 
with such veterans as Joe Cotten, 
Claudette Colbert, Shirley Temple and 
Lionel Barrymore—and drew 10,000 
fan letters during the picture’s first 
rim. (The screen’s leading glamor 
boys don’t do any better than that!) 
And who, some two years later, is still 
drawing a couple of thousand letters 
a month—all on the strength of that 
same, lone 400 feet of film! 

Just recently released from service, 
Guy is the current excitement of the 
Selznick lot. Yet, if the sailor stand¬ 
ing on that highway two years ago, 
hadn’t been exactly the kind of nor¬ 
mal, clear-thinking kid he is, the 
screen might have missed him—and 
vice versa. 

He was aimed for the beach at Santa 
Monica and if he had accepted the 
red head’s lift, would undoubtedly 
have spent the rest of his afternoon 
surf-boarding. He stood, refusing to 
“load her below her water-line,” until 
the driver of the car behind became 
impatient and beckoned the gob to 
hop in with him, instead. The driver 
of the second car was a surly fellow, 
who didn’t usually bother to stop for 
servicemen, he said. Stopping cost 
gas and oil, and everything was going 
to the Army and Navy anyhow; part 
of the Government’s plan for making 
war hard on civilians, and so on. 

Listening to the war-torn citizen, 
the sailor kid began to get “uneasy.” 

“Look—,” he finally blurted out, 
“You’re home aren’t you? Nothing 
could be better than that. There’s a 
million guys right now who think just 
being home is the ultimate goal in 
life!” 

“Home” to Guy meant Bakersfield, 
California, and a job as a telephone 
linesman. More than that, it meant a 
Dad who believed kids ought to have 
a farm to grow up on, and a Mother 
who believed kids ought to go to 
church every Sunday. It meant 17 
year old brother Harold, who’s a great 
pal for hunting and fishing “and 
tries to copy everything I do,” and an 
older sister who isn’t married, “but 
will be—she’s sure pretty.” He’d given 
it up, willingly, the day he climbed 
down from his job and applied to the 
Army Air Force. And when he’d found 
the air quota filled, he’d refused to 
wait around, but enlisted in the Navy 
instead. All in all, the stranger had 
picked the wrong fellow to whine to. 

“I’d heard that kind of talk be¬ 
fore—” he remembers, “but it never 


did set too well with servicemen. 
Somehow, I suddenly didn’t care much 
about getting to Santa Monica. When 
we hit Sunset Boulevard, I hopped 
out and thanked him, before I’d have 
to hit him.” 

He decided he’d find something else 
to do with this afternoon, and by the 
time he walked into a Hollywood 
broadcasting theater a little later, his 
grin was back in place again. The 
Guy can’t help standing out in a 
crowd in the same way a lighthouse 
can’t help standing out on a rock— 
because it’s bigger and brighter than 
anything near it—and it happened to 
be a particularly fortunate crowd to 
stand out in. The broadcast hadn’t had 
time to start when the sailor was 
tapped on the shoulder by a lean¬ 
faced gentleman with dark hair and a 
very big job as Assistant to David 
Selznick. 

The gentleman, Henry Willson, was 
moving quickly, like a man who has 
seen a gold-piece lying on the side¬ 
walk and is wondering how long be¬ 
fore someone else sees it, too. Re¬ 
questing the gob to step out into the 
hall, he told him he knew where he 
could find a movie contract. 

“But I can’t act,” protested the 
Bakersfield kid on his way to the 
studio. “I’ll feel silly meeting Mr. 
Selznick. I won’t know what to say 
to him. I’ve never even acted in school 
plays—” 

Neither could Lana Turner act 
when Willson discovered her having 
a soda in a Hollywood drugstore; nor 
Joan Fontaine, when he spotted her 
in a crowded restaurant. It was Will- 
son who discovered Jon Hall, Anne 
Shirley and Jim Brown, so he’s an ex¬ 
perienced hand at spotting that 
“spark” that kindles office bonfires. 

Young Madison got an immediate 
post-war contract, and he got into 
his one picture before V-J day, almost 
by accident. After signing him, D.O.S. 
found he couldn’t get the kid’s ingra¬ 
tiating personality out of his mind, 
the same mind that was filled with the 
all-star super-super he was produc¬ 
ing at the time. It got so that every 
time he viewed the day’s rushes, or 
thought over the story of “Since You 
Went Away,” he found himself wait¬ 
ing for the part where the boy in 
blue would walk in. Finally, mostly 
as an experiment, he had Guy written 
into the script just as he was, grin, 
uniform and all. 

When, after that long interlude be¬ 
tween a picture’s filming and its show¬ 
ing, the fans got a look at Madison, 
his movie career was off with a pre¬ 
mature bang—like something they 
didn’t know was loaded. Theater audi¬ 
ences whistled and stamped when he 
flashed on the screen. Since neither 
mode of expression has ever been fe¬ 
male in usage, it indicated the two- 
way, both-sexes screen-pull which has 
come in so handy with Gable, Bogart, 
et al. 

Mr. Willson’s “spark” had been 
tossed into a cast already neon-lit, and 
made history. The kid accustomed to 
calling it a great day when Mail Call 
yielded one fat letter from Mom, sud¬ 
denly had 10,000 letters running from 
“Ah-h” to “Zowie.” The usual raves 
from the impressionable younger-set, 
of course, but also from oldsters writ¬ 
ing “the first fan letter I’ve ever 
(Continued on page 99) 



YOUR FIGURE 

Quickly, Safely, at Home 

Shy? Embarrassed? Self-conscious due to shape¬ 
less, unappealing body lines? Now, learn to 
develop thrilling curves, an alluring bustline 
... right in your own home! Make yourself 
attractive, vivacious—develop yourself into a 
glamorous, glorious personality. It’s amazingly 
easy with the aid of the Bonomo Home Course 
on Bust Culture. What a joy to know that 
you’re popular, admired! Let this self-improve¬ 
ment course help you achieve new loveliness 
right in the privacy of your home. 

"J was so Undeveloped, 

Unattractive, Lonesome” 

WRITES ANN YAGER of EUWOOD CITY, PA. 



BEFORE 


AFTER 


Ann Yager’s shapeless body 
caused great unhappiness and 
misery. Then Ann tried the 
Bonomo Home Course on Bust 
Culture. Now, she’s a new, 
enticing . . . popular girl. 

SEND NO MONEY 

You, too, may gain great bene¬ 
fits from this unusual course. 
It was prepared by Mr. Joe 
Bonomo, famed beauty authority 
and guide to many of Holly¬ 
wood’s loveliest stars. Fill in 
and mail coupon now. If you 
are not satisfied, return course in 
10 days for full purchase price 
refund. Course sent in unmarked 
wrapper. 



JOE BONOMO 

world famous beauty 
authority and pub¬ 
lisher of "Beautify 
Tour Figure," your 
Guide to Grace, 
Beauty and Charm 
... at all news¬ 
stands. 


— MAIL COUPON TODAY — 

Joe Bonomo, Personal 

BONOMO CULTURE INSTITUTE, Dept. B-223 
1841 Broadway. New York 23, N. Y. 

Please rush your complete Home Course on Bust Culture 
in unmarked wrapper. I'll pay postman $1.97 plus postage 
on delivery. If not satisfied, I may return it within 10 
days and get my purchase price back. 


.please* Print Plainiy 

Address....—— 

City...Zona.State.., 

□ Check here if you enclose $1.97 for delivery postpaid. 

(Canadian & Foreign. $2.50 cash with order) yj 
















98 




DO YOU PINE FOR 

LOHGER HAIR? 

Try the RONOLA METHOD of 

Hair Care for 1 week, and see if the 
enjoyment of really attractive hair 
can be yours, lovely hair that so 
often means Love and Romance. 
In many cases, short hair may be 
due to splitting and breaking-off of 
the hair, and to dryness of the hair 
and scalp. 

HAIR MAY GET LONGER 

Often in many cases. Hair may get 
longer when hair and scalp are in a 
normal, healthy condition and dry, 
brittle, breaking ofT ends can be re¬ 
tarded to give the hair a chance to grow. 
That’s why you should try the RONOLA 
METHOD at once, because it helps to 
soften tough, brittle ends caused by 
hair dryness due to lack of natural oils. 
So if dry, tough, hard-to-manage hair is 
your trouble, lose no time in trying the 
RONOLA METHOD for just 7 days and see for yourself 
what a difference it makes. 

ENJOY NEW HAIR STYLES 

When your hair is softer, silkier and 
more easy to manage, you can dress 
It in many of the new and latest hair 
styles that will help you become more 
attractive to the opposite sex. 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR MONEY BACK 

Just try the RONOLA METHOD for 7 days and see 
for yourself what it may do for you. Price only SI .20 inc. 
tax (C.O.D. postage extra). Then follow the few easy 
directions and if you are not absolutely satisfied in every 
way, your money will be promptly returned. So don’t 
wait any longer. Mail your order today! 

^ THE RONALD CO., DEPT. 114 
6605 Cottage Grove Ave., Chicago 37, III. 

Learn to Write 

Short Stories, Mysteries, 
Novels and Articles 

— at home in your spare time. 
New opportunities now for new 
writers — full time or part time. 

T H E demand for writers is creating great new 
opportunities for people with an urge to write. 
It's not as hard to succeed as you may imagine. 
Most famous authors come from ordinary walks 
of life. At home, you too may learn fiction writ¬ 
ing, the best basis for all fields—short stories, 
novels, features, articles, radio scripts. Palmer In¬ 
stitute’s Home Study Training (Established 1917) 
is endorsed by Rupert Hughes, Ruth Comfort 
Mitchell, Gertrude Atherton, Katharine Newlin 
Burt and other famous authors and by scores of 
successful graduates. Complete instruction ma¬ 
terial and professional coach¬ 
ing to develop your own style. 

FREE book explains how you 
may enjoy an ideal part time 
or full time career. Write to¬ 
day (no salesman will call). 

PALMER INSTITUTE OF AUTHORSHIP. Desk D27 
Palmer Building, Hollywood 28, California 


♦cFREE^^i 

fo Art of Writing' 
Salable Stories 


n: 

I Sa 





and his growing hair 


In millionaires’ mansions and 
cottage kitchens, you’ll find 
PADDY O’HAIR —the most be¬ 
loved, amusing novelty ever 
created. Shure—’tis magic! Fill 
with water; spread special seed—watch the 
miracle! PADDY grows thick crop of bright 
green hair, eyebrows and sideburns. You can 
give him haircuts; the grass will grow for 
months; can be planted again and again. Head 
is durable pottery; rich suntan color; 5 inches 
tall. Thousands buy PADDY 
for themselves then re¬ 
order for gifts. Ideal gift 
for St. Patrick's. Mother’s 
Day—every other day. Sent 
complete with special seed 
and instructions. $1 post¬ 
paid, money back guaran¬ 
tee. Send $1 with order 
and we pay postage; or 
will ship C.O.D. and you 
pay postman $1.36 Order 
today. 

PADDY NOVELTY CO. 

530 Washington Avenue 
Goliad. Texas 


You will love 


(Continued from page 96) 

THE BANDIT OF SHERWOOD FOREST 

(Columbia) —Dashing Cornel Wilde 
swashbuckles around as the son of 
Robin Hood. Carrying on Pappy’s 
traditions might have been a problem 
but Friar Tuck (Edgar Buchanan) 
Will Scarlet (John Abbott), Little 
John (Ray Teal) and Allan-A-Dale 
(Leslie Denison), are on hand to help 
out. Anita Louise is the lady in dis¬ 
tress. 

HOODLUM SAINT(MGM)— When Adven¬ 
turer William Powell convinces his 
shady friends that they have a bene¬ 
factor in the patron saint of hoodlums, 
St. Dismas, he isn’t prepared for the 
influence the saint will have on him. 
The Snarp, (James Gleason), Fish 
face (Rags Ragland), the Eel, (Slim 
Summerville), and Three Fingers 
(Frank McHugh) become reformed 
characters, and even Dusty (Angela 
Lansbury) eventually sees the light. 
Aquatic star Esther Williams dives 
into drama for the first time in this 
one. 

I RING DOORBELLS (PRC), from the 
book by Russell Birdwell, is a murder 
mystery with Anne Gwynne, Robert 
Shayne, Roscoe Karns and others. The 
murder? Pretty golddigger, Jan Wiley. 
The mystery: Why, who done it, 
natch! 


IDEA GIRL (Universal) is a comedy of 
errors in the music publishing field. 
Julie Bishop cooks up schemes to put 
over the songs published by J. C. 
Crow, owned and operated by Alan 
Mowbray and Jess Barker. 

Barker is not a willing partner but 
his protests are unheeded until love 
and money, in the end, overcome him. 
Charlie Barnett and his orchestra 
arrange themselves in attractive atti¬ 
tudes of song. 

TANGIER (Universal)— The craze for 
“Casablanca” copies goes on apace. 
Political intrigue, with international 
implications, abound in Tangier, melt¬ 
ing pot of North Africa. 

Maria Montez, Louise Allbritton and 
Kent Taylor are in pursuit of Balizar, 
an unknown power who was responsi¬ 
ble for the torture and slaying of 
thousands during the Spanish Revolu¬ 
tion. Sabu (out of his soldier suit 
and wearing his turban headgear) 
plays Pepe (not le Moko), a tipster. 
Preston Foster, J. Edward Bromberg 
and Reginald Denny mysteriously ap¬ 
pear—and disappear! 



Kent Taylor loves Maria Montez in "Tangier." 




Just to get acquainted we will send 
you a beautiful 5x7 inch professional 
enlargement made from your favorite 
snapshot, picture, print or negative, 
practically FREE! All we ask is 3c 
for handling and mailing. This is a 
genuine introductory offer by one of the most reliable 
studios in the U. S.— over a million satisfied customers I 
To receive your beautiful enlargement send snapsnot, 
picture, print or negative (negative pre¬ 
ferred) with this ad. Your enlargement 
returned together with your picture. 

Offer limited. Rush your order NOW I 




FREE! EXTRA SPECIAL! Promptly upon 

receipt of your picture, print or negative, 
we’ll send—by return mail—a marvelous 
photo folder which accommodates 8 snap, 
shots! Supply limited. Act TODAY! 

AMERICAN STUDIOS, Box 216, LaCrosse, Wis. 


Photo 

Folder 


A far and Srautik if, 

E 


U/LTPIECES 


Yard^mc^YArds—thre^pounde^ 
or more. BARGAIN 1 Beautiful 
prints,checks, stripes, solids. Fast 
colors. ALL NEW1 FREE illus- — 
trated designs and patterns with order. 
Only $1.39 plus postage. Sent C.O.D. 
SEND NO MONEY. Jostapenny postcard " 

or letter. If not satisfied, return package 
and your $1.39 will be refunded. Order 
TODAY. THE COLONIAL SHOP, 
Dept.l7-C,Zeigler, Illinois. 



GENUINE 

• coats capes 

■ 1m JACKETS ,ET( 


LOW FREE CATALOG 

PP|£CC Buy direct from one of the 
mn«> reliable wholesale fur 
organizations. The latest styles, quality 
furs. Sizes 10 to 46, in a wide selection 
to choose from: Sliver Foxes, Muskrats, 
Skunks, Ponies, Kidskins. Raccoons, 
Coneys. Plus Many Other Furs. Satis- 
faction guaranteed or money refunded 
Send for free catalog! 

H. M. i. FUR CO. 

150 -T W. 28 St., New York I, N. Y. 




BUNIONS 


QUICK PAIN RELIEF 

Fairyfoot quickly relieves terribl 
sUnging itching bunion pains . . 
Swelling goes down. — No specia 
shoes. Apply soothing Fairyfoo 
and get blessed relief quickly. 

FREE SAM PLE.—-Write Today 
ciiDvcnnr ««•.. Its Free. No cost to you. 
rAlnirUUT, 1223 So. Wabash, Dept. 1741, CHICAGO 5, ILLINOI 


ASTHMA 

(K* 10-DAY TRIAL OFFER! 


WRITE 

FOR ... 

nwQV/fc U f FERFR ? MBRONCHIALASTHMAp AR- 
OA\bMS. from coughs gasping wheezing—write quick 

f0 n d ^ ar -'*K g 10 r D * Y TR,AL OFFER. Inquiries from so- 
caned hopeless cases especially invited. 

NACOR, 1093 K, State Life Bldg., Indianapolis 4. Ind. 


ENLARGEMENTS 


4x5 
5x7 
8x10 
11x14 


By SPECIALISTS . . . Satisfaction Guaranteed 

lour Favorite Negatives Expertly Printed on Double 
Weight Matt Paper 
E »ch For 3 For 5 

•H® -55 .80 

•25 65 1.00 

•J5 1-20 1.80 

1*80 2.50 3.75 

Prices for 3 and 5 are from same negative 
bend money with order and save C.O.D charges 
Windsor Photo Service, Box 1034-M, Baltimore 3."’Md. 

MOVIE STAR PHOTOGRAPHS 

REAL HI-GL0SS PHOTOS 

Newest portraits & pin up poses 

NOW New photos of 

your favorite 
stars. Please state 
_ 16 for $ 1 second choice. 

MOVIE STAR HOMES IN COLOR SJ 

and famous Hollywood scenes 40 views I 

STAR PHOTOS Station Los Angeles B 36 3 

California, Dept. M3-6 

















































Bob Mitchum and wife "Till the End of Time." 


fCONTINUED FROM PAGE 971 

written—just had to, the kid was so 
darned natural—” and, “Made you 
think he was already there, standing 
around with the bowling alley gang, 
when the story characters walked in.” 
Letters from the males called him, 
“the first really plausible sailor I’ve 
seen on the screen.” 

This last opinion, as it turned out, 
was no shock to Naval circles. Even 
today, with a discharge button in his 
lapel, he is still a very plausible 
sailor, in his thoughts, manner and 
conversation. While Uncle Sam held 
his option, his life and privileges re¬ 
mained exactly the same as that of his 
buddies. The one change in his for¬ 
tunes was the acquisition of “a torp 
for transpo,” which translated into 
Civilianese meant a jalop for jumpin’ 
into town. A small, second-hand job, 
but as far as he is concerned it is still 
the proudest thing on the road: 

“I remember how it was back in 
High School,” he says, “when the kids 
whose parents had given them cars 
went in cliques; and how they were 
always pulling rank on the rest of us. 
It makes me feel good to know that 
the car I’ve got now, is something 
I earned on my own.” 

For some twenty-four months he 
stayed a full-time swabbie and an 
occasional, week-end movie star. Dur¬ 
ing those hard-won liberties, some 
startling things happened to him. 
There was one night when the kid 
who’d never had nerve enough to 
write for a pin-up picture, suddenly 
found himself toting Judy Garland, 
in person, to a big premiere, and an¬ 
other when he wore Shirley Temple 
on his arm to the Mocambo. Too, there 
was the evening when he dined with 
Anne Shirley and Henry Willson at a 
movietown restaurant, and the waiter 
handed him a thirty-dollar dinner 
check. It was more zeros than he’d 
ever before seen on a chow ticket: 

“In my family,—” he says, “we 
spent a dollar the same way we earned 
it— the hard way.” Happily, both the 
bill and the date with Anne, belonged 
to Mr. Willson. 

One Saturday he spent a large part 
of the afternoon stretched out in bed 
in the spacious bedroom of Willson’s 
canyon home. Outside, it was one of 
those live, golden week-ends when 
the average human beats it outdoors, 
takes a deep whiff of weather, and 
starts acting like he’s walking on 
rubber heels clear up to his knees. 
Inside, in utter disregard of time 
or his custom, lay Guy, who, it could 
be plainly seen, was not the average 
human. 


What is probably the most terrific 
torso that ever happened, even in 
Hollywood, rippled with an assort¬ 
ment of muscles that could easily be 
divided between two lesser speci¬ 
mens. His permanently tanned skin 
glowed a gold-bronze against the 
white sheets and his thick, bright hair 
had that look which, even when 
combed, seems as if it had been given 
an affectionate touseling by a fresh 
breeze. He was the perfect picture— 
and the ring of five people standing 
around his bed, knew it. 

“Can we have the top sheet just a 
little lower so we can get an inch or 
two more of the chest?” asked the 
photog, busy taking a whole layout 
of poses answering all the things the 
fans have wanted to know how this 
fellow sleeps, eats, and what he does 
for fun. 

Guy lay propped against the pil¬ 
lows, flash-bulbs exploding almost in 
his face, a big grin accentuating the 
positiveness of his content. “Gee, I’ve 
dreamed of this,” he said, talking to 
the ceiling. “All during ‘boot’ when 
I’d hit the sack, I’d lie and think 
about it—and I still do. Seems too 
good to be true.” 

“Being in pictures, you mean,” said 
a publicity woman, busy with pad 
and pencil. 

“Heck, no—being in a real bed! The 
Navy takes good care of us, but there’s 
something about a big, wide bed, and 
nobody blasting you out of it with a 
bugle, that makes you think of home.” 
Suddenly he sat straight up and shot 
the publicist a look of stark incredul¬ 
ity. “You mean you think I ever 
dreamed about getting into movies? 
Holy smoke, I never was that crazy— 
even in my sleep!” 

Guy doesn’t know exactly what he 
expected a movie studio to be like the 
first day he saw one: sort of phony¬ 
looking, maybe. Several times with 
his mates, he’d gone to the Hollywood 
Canteen and collected star autographs. 

“I never kept the signatures like 
the other fellows did. Mostly I wanted 
to get a close-up look at Hedy La¬ 
marr, or Bing Crosby, or somebody. 

I never could get over the kick of 
finding out they were human; that 
some of the glamor girls had freckles, 
and the fellows had little laugh-lines 
around their eyes just like anybody 
else.” 

He was equally impressed walking 
through the Selznick executive build¬ 
ing—which looks more like a stately 
old Georgian mansion—and out 
across the bustling business-like lots. 

“It seemed awfully big, and aw¬ 
fully real,” he remembers. “Up until 
then, I’d been figuring on going out 
with a fishing schooner after the war, 
and earning myself a stake to get 
started in something better. Walking 
around the lot, that first day, I knew 
I’d found a place I’d like to work. It 
was swell to know I’d have a job to 
come back to, but I didn’t have any 
illusions about it being easy.” 

He determined to qualify, and that’s 
the way he went at things. Even 
standing up in front of a diction 
teacher and repeating silly sounds like 
“Ca-ga, Ca-ga,” he managed to have' 
the serious look of a fellow who’s 
mentally rolled up his sleeves. It was 
a long time between lessons and 
screen-tests, what with waiting for 
furloughs, and his script had to be 
studied at night in the barracks. 

No matter how big an actor ever 
becomes, he rarely forgets the terror 
and triumph of his first performance. 
If it’s not good, it’s apt to be his last. 



SEE THESE IMPROVEMENTS IN YOURSELF 
WITHIN 10 DAYS ... OR YOUR MONEY BACK! 

• Helps You Look Slendei at Once! 

• Helps You Look and Feel More Youthful! 

• Helps Your Bustline! 

Takes in stomach and expands chest. 

• You Appear Taller! 

Correct posture gives you lull height. 

• You Attain Poise! 

By overcoming that “slouch" 

Takes in Inches Where You Need I! Most! 

Why bulge all over and lack appeal? Be attractive! Be 
desirable! You too can help yourself to a more slender 
youthful figure as thousands of women have with the re¬ 
markable “SLEND-R-FORM” girdle supporters. So light, 
yet firm . . . YOU FORGET YOU HAVE IT ON! Walk, sit! 
bend with comfort! On and off in a jiffy. Elastic two-way 
stretch with invisible “CONCENTRATED-ZONE” Sup¬ 
ports takes in inches around hips, waist, rear and stom¬ 
ach! Cool and comfortable on your body. Reinforced 
waistline and FIRM ELASTIC GARTERS help to prevent 
curling on top and bottom! Clothes fit smoothly! Wear 
smaller size dresses! Fits as well as one made to order. 
Become one of our satisfied customers! Only $2.98 for all 
LAST! Worth much more * ORDER NOW WHILE THEY 

Don’t send a cent! 
Wear for 10 days 
. at our expense 

and see for yourself the improvement and appeal of your 
new figure! Just mail coupon now! 


SEND NO MONEY! 


FREE 


SECRETS OF 
BEAUTY AND CHARM! 


Packed with priceless secrets by : 
Bowers, well known authority 
on beauty and personality. 
Shows you how to easily and 1 
safely gain or lose weight, \ 

• 1 e a r complexion, brighten ] 
•yes, beautify hair, speak 
harmingly, develop person¬ 
ality and many more valu¬ 
able secrets. This full-size 
book sells for $1.98 alone. 

But now it is yours FREE 
with the order of the 
“SLEND-R-FORM” Girdle 
Supporter. LIMITED COPIES 
-ORDER NOW’! 


C«AH!A 

f ERSOHAltf* 


WEAR WITHOUT BUYING! 


NEW YORK MAIL ORDER HOUSE, Dept. G-7-C 
13 ASTOR PLACE. NEW YORK 3, N. Y. 

Rush to me in plain wrapper the “SLEND-R-FORM” 
Girdle Supporter plus the FREE Book “CHARM AND 
PERSONALITY”. I will oay postman on delivery $2.98 
plus postage. If not completely satisfied in 10 days 
I may return merchandise and get my money back. 

□ HIP SIZE. □ WAIST SIZE. 

NAME. 

ADDRESS.-. 

CITY & ZONE. STATE. 

□ Check here if you wish to save postage by enclosing 
$2.98 with the coupon. 


99 














ill 








sy 



SILVER PLATED TABLEWARE 


You 11 love this beautiful Tableware Set of exquisite grace 
and design, life-long quality, and sparkling beauty. A luxurious 
treasure you’ll enjoy for years to come. You’ll be proud to 
have this lovely Set grace your table—proud to have your 
friends see this beautifully matched, perfectly balanced, 
Tableware Set. Consists of 6 beautifully designed knives, 
6 forks, 12 teaspoons. 6 soup spoons._ 


GIVEN 


Beautiful 30-Piece Tableware Chest and 
F. B. Rogers Silver Polishing Cloth 
_ with Every Order _ 


„ . SEND NO MONEY—1« Diy Tnil ia Y«« On Hene 

Yee! we mean it. Examine the Bet for 10 full days. Upoo 
arrival, pay poetman only $0.96 plua postage. Order now 
before we are all sold out. You’ll be delighted! 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR MONEY BACK/ 
Grot American Salta Ce., 2226 Siberian Way, Dept. S32. Chicago 16 IIL 



Why spend needless time and 
money when Dr. Guild’s GREEN 
MOUNTAIN ASTHMATIC 
COMPOUND may bring comfort¬ 
ing relief from the misery of asth¬ 
matic attacks? On sale at nearly all 
drugstores. Cigarettes, 50CPowder, 
25t and $1.00. If your dealer cannot 
supply you, order direct. Use only 
as directed on package. A FREE 
SAMPLE will prove how much this 
trusted product can help you. Write 
J.H.GuildCo.,Dept. H-21.Rupert.Vt. 



BEAUTIFUL 
FINGERNAILS 


Don’t be embarrassed by 
short, broken, thin nails. It’s 
so easy to cover unsightly 
nails with nu-nails. Applied 
in a j iffy, they bring you long, 
lovely nails that everyone ad¬ 
mires. Can be worn any length 
and polished any shade. Help you 
overcome nail biting habit. Set of 
10 only 20c at all 5c-10c stores. 

NII-NAII ARTIFICIAL 
n u -n h i t-o FINGERNAILS 

1525 W. Harrison St Dept. 23-C, Chicago 



^RAY 

HAIR 

...AND LOOK 10 
YEARS YOUNGER 


• Now, at home, you can quickly tint telltale gray to 
natural-appearing shades—from lightest blonde to dark¬ 
est black. Brownatone and a small brush does it—or your 
money back. Approved by thousands—Brownatone Is 
guaranteed harmless when used as directed. No skin test 
needed. The principal coloring agent Is a purely vege¬ 
table derivative with Iron and copper salts added for fast 
action. Cannot affect waving of hair. Lasting—does not 
wash out. Just brush or comb it In. One application 
Imparts desired color. Simply retouch, as new gray ap¬ 
pears. Easy to prove on a test lock of your hair. 60o 
and $1.65 at druggists. Get BROWNATONE now. or 

Write for FREE TEST BOTTLE 

Mention natural color of your hair. Send a post card 
today—BROWNATONE, Dept. 263, COVINGTON, KY. 


Good or bad, it would be Guy’s first 
and last for an uncertain length of 
time, which gave him all the con¬ 
fidence of a fellow about to play hop¬ 
scotch on an area he knows is heavily 
mined. They went to Pasadena for the 
filming, to a real emporium of the 
pins, and after he’d watched Jennifer 
and Bob Walker face the cameras, his 
nerves quieted down to a St. Vitus 
dance. For naturalness, the script had 
the sailor smoking a cigarette. This 
particular gob had never smoked in 
his life, and the thing felt like a 
baseball bat between his fingers. He 
had a sneaking fear the first puff 
might make him actively sick. 

The first sound he was to utter was 
a loud laugh of the species known as 
“horse,” to be directed at Bob Walker, 
and he thought maybe this was the 
wrong direction. He found himself 
making small and furtive sounds in 
his throat to be sure his voice hadn’t 
gone AWOL. 

“The minute I realized how scared 
I was, though, I knew everything was 
going to be all right—” 

Once, when Guy was seven years 
old, he found himself too scared to 
speak up when he should have, and 
he’s never forgotten it. He was so 
skinny and listless at that age, his 
parents had sent him to a preventa- 
torium, up in the mountains. With 
other underweight youngsters, he sun¬ 
bathed and played in the snow clad 
only in shorts, and did other things 
designed to help them eat up three 
or four helpings of everything at meal 
time. The juvenile Guy had his own 
method for unbalancing his diet, how¬ 
ever, by rolling up his day’s supply of 
toast and stuffing it in his shorts. 

It worked, until one day when lined 
up for a shower, the bundle of toast 
fell out of his shorts—and landed at 
another kid’s feet! The other young¬ 
ster already had so many “crimes” 
against him, it seemed useless to deny 
that the ghastly remains were his. 
Guy stood, swallowing his tonsils, 
while the little scapegoat was yanked 
out of line by the nurse. He stayed 
silent, too, when the kid had to make 
publi^ apology in the dining room, and 
laboriously had to choke down all the 
extra toast, just as if he hadn’t al¬ 
ready eaten his own quota! 

After Guy had grown up and 
learned to make a stack of toast dis¬ 
appear like it was buttered with van¬ 
ishing cream, he met the “bad boy” 
again. The other fellow laughed loud¬ 
ly at that long-ago incident, but its 
perpetrator has never been able to 
consider it funny. 

“It taught me that a person only 
thinks he gets away with something; 
it’s always with you, even if nobody 
knows it but yourself. And it taught 
me that the harder a thing is to say, 
the more reason why you’ve got to 
speak up and take the consequences. 
That’s why, when I had to, I could get 
the dialog off my chest.” 

By the time a person has reached 
22, he’s learned other lessons he can 
use, if he’s smart. He knew the value 
of keeping still at the proper time, too. 
He hadn’t yet written a word home to 
Mom and Pop about that day Mr. Will- 
son tapped him on the shoulder. He 
didn’t write them even after seeing 
his rushes in the studio projection 
room and knowing that his screen 
debut was getting raves around the 
lot. His explanation of his caution is 
characteristic: 

“I figured the whole thing was 
something like under-water fishing, 
which is a swell sport if you’re not 


MONEY-BACK, POSTAGE-BACK GUARANTEE 

QUILT PIECES 


FREE! 700 Yds. Thread! 

Large colorful pieces. 3 lbs. (18 to 
22 yds.) only $1.49 plus postage. Sent 
C.O.D. on Money-back guarantee. 

FREE! EXTRA! Seven hundred 
(700) yds. good white #50 thread 
FREE and 16 lovely quilt patterns j 
all sent free to anyone. If not per-# 
fectly satisfied, just return quilt\ 
pieces (keeping free sewing thread 
and free quilt patterns for your trou¬ 
ble) and we will refund your $1.49 plus i 
postage spent BOTH ways! You be the 
judge. You can’t lose. Could anything be 
more fair? Compare our offer and liberal 
guarantee with others. SEND NO MONEY! 

Just mail a card TODAY! Act NOW! 

REMNANT SHOP, Bo* 426-C SESSER, ILLINOIS 



ENLARGED 

57 * 


ANY PHOTO 

Size 8 x 10 Inches 
on DOUBLE-WEIGHT PAPER 

Same price for full length or 
bust form, groups, landscapes, 
pet animals, etc., or enlarge¬ 
ments of any part of group 
picture. 

Original returned with your <% 
enlargement. £ fOf 

SEND NO MONEY man photo. 

tive or snapshot (anv size) and receive your 
rgement, guaranteed fadeless, on beautiful 
ble- weight portrait quality paper. Pay 
postman 67c plus postage— or send 69c with order 

and we pay postage. Take advantage of this offer now. Send 

your photos tor**- 


igati 

enlarge me 

double-w 



PROFESSIONAL ART STUDIOS 

lOO East Ohio Street Dept. 816-C Chicago (11), III. 


BE A NURSE —Study at Home 


Earn while learning—Opportunities every¬ 
where. Big post-war demand—Big Salaries. 
Easy lessons followed by 6 months 

FREE HOSPITAL TRAINING 

(optional) High school not necessary. No 
age limit. 8end for FREE “Nursing Facts'* 
and sample lesson pages. Act now! 

POST GRADUATE HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Dept. 8, 137 N. Dearborn St. 
Chicago 2, Illinois 



EXTRA 
MONEY 
FOR YOU 


SELL GREETING CARDS 
AND PERSONAL STATIONERY 


Take easy orders from 

friends, neighbors. Sell 

beautiful $1.00 All Occa¬ 
sion Assortment. Costs you 
50c up per box. Also Birthday, Baby 

Congratulation. Gift Wrapping. Humorous, 

Scripture Text assortments 35c up. Up to 
100% profit. Extra Bonus. Request $1.00 

Everyday assortment on approval and Free Stationery 
portfolio. Special Offer. 

ELMIRA GREETING CARD CO., Dept. M-25, Elmira, N.Y. 


FREE 

SAMPLES 

NAME 

IMPRINTED 

STATIONERY 


High School Course 

at Home 


Many Finish in 2 Years 

Go as rapidly as your time and abilities permit. Course 
equivalent to resident school work—prepares for college 
entrance exams. Standard H.S. texts supplied. Diploma. 

Credit for H. S. subjects already completed. SiDgle subjects if de¬ 
sired. High school education is very important for advancement in 
business and industry and socially. Don’t be handicapped all your 
life. Be a High School graduate. Start your training now. Free 
Bulletin on request. No obligation* 

iAmerican School, Oept. H-371, Droxel at 58th, Chicago 37 


Decuq^i &ma/i£ TzmAwtia 

LEARN AT HOME-SPARE TIME 


Fascinating field. Design own wardrobe at consid- 
1 i WJj^ erable saving. Gain experience designing foroth- 
j er 8- It may leadto thrilling career—evenashopof 


your own some day. Basic ‘learn-by-doing"cours6 
under guidance of qualified teachers provides ex- 
cellent starting point for a career. Send for 
free booklet, “A Career in Dress Designing.** 

- national school of dress design 

1315 So. Michigan Ave. Dept. 1863 Chicago 5, III. 



YOUR PHOTO On 

STATIONERY 

< 0/1 COMPLETE <1 00 
• C/ SETS ONLY /- 


Send any size Photo or 
Snapshot and receive a 
complete set of 20 en¬ 
velopes and double-folded 
sheets to match with 20 
reproductions of your pho¬ 
to. EACH ONE IS AN 
ACTUAL HIGHGLOSS 
PHOTOGRAPH. Your 
photo returned unharmed. 
Send only $1.00. Color- 
tone 50c extra. C.O.D.’s 
accepted. 

iPHOTO STATIONERY CO. 
3B W. 33rd St., Dpt. 65,N.Y. 


AP£X sun glasses for eye comfor t 









































over-confident. There’s always a lay¬ 
er of seaweed on top of the water, 
looking so pretty and harmless you’re 
apt to plunge right into it and find 
yourself fighting a mass of roots grow¬ 
ing deep down. Fellows have been 
trapped and drowned that way. I 
wanted to feel my way in this acting 
business, too. I wasn’t going to do any 
bragging to the folks and have them 
disappointed if I landed on the cut¬ 
ting-room floor.” 

When he reported back to San 
Diego after his camera chore, a couple 
of the fellows who had caught him 
studying his script in the barracks, 
looked up and said things like “Greet¬ 
ings, Ham—” or, “Well as I live and 
perspire, the glamor boy is back 
among us.” The jibing, not all of it 
well-meant, was like woolen under¬ 
wear—you had to get used to it. 

After the picture was definitely in 
the can, and himself along with it, he 
wrote the folks. Going home to Bak¬ 
ersfield after the premiere, he knew 
he had still to face his toughest audi¬ 
ence. Dad stood looking at him for a 
minute after he walked in—a judge 
who knew the Guy at the bar so well 
that a look was all he needed. 

“You’ve changed,” he said finally. 
“You’ve gotten bigger. Turning into 
a man—I’d better be hiding my razor.” 

“They must be feeding you right 
in the Navy,” said Mom. 

He had their verdict, and he was 
pretty happy about it. They were sat¬ 
isfied with him as a son and a sailor, 
and the only really important thing 
about his also being a movie actor 
was that it hadn’t done anything to 
him they wouldn’t have wanted it to. 

Guy’s real name is Mosely. It be¬ 
came Madison, in a rather typical 
manner. He and Henry Willson were 
driving along, Henry thinking about 
a screen-name for his new find, Guy 
thinking about how long it was to 
lunch-time. They passed a bill-board 
picturing a voluptuous, chocolate-cov¬ 
ered cake, a product of the Madison 
bakeries. “What’s wrong with that?” 
asked Guy, meaning he couldn’t think 
of a more enjoyable pastime than eat¬ 
ing his way right through those choco¬ 
late layers. “Not a thing,” said Henry, 


“I like it—Guy ‘Madison’—that’s it!” 

One week when Guy was first meet¬ 
ing Hollywood, Henry told his cook 
they were having company for break¬ 
fast. She put a fancy cloth on the 
table, and prepared the food as or¬ 
dered: eight eggs, two orders of bacon, 
a large-bowl of cereal, a stack of toast, 
a tall glass of orange juice and a half 
grapefruit, and a bottle of milk. 
Everything was right for eating; she 
placed four chairs around the table, 
and signalled Mr. Willson to bring 
• on the breakfast party. In walked a 
solitary sailor who swung a leg over 
one chair, and did a complete and 
blissful job of the entire spread! 

Next to eating, “The Torso” likes 
to sleep. Regular hours are one of the 
secrets of his perfect health, and if a 
party lasts too late he is perfectly un¬ 
selfconscious about finding a divan 
and stretching out on it. When awake 
he prefers to be doing something— 
something strenuous, such as hunting, 
under-water fishing, or surf-boarding. 
He’s an expert with the bow and 
arrow, and makes his own arrows. 

Considering that he has all the 
equipment for it, Guy is not much of 
an “operator” (Navy for “wolf.”) He’s 
always liked girls. . the ones 

who know how to dress but don’t keep 
making you conscious of it, and use 
enough perfume but not too much. 
Sure, I’ll get married someday—when 
I find somebody—because having a 
wife and a home and a family is 
swell. But I’ve got a lot of work and 
studying to do first, and I know it.” 

Guy’s first post-war assignment was 
on loan-out to RKO, for “Till The 
End Of Time.” At this writing, his 
next Selznick picture has not been 
announced, but it is a cinch that his 
grooming will be a careful one. Some¬ 
day Guy Madison’s fame and fortune 
will be fuller than his sane young 
mind will let him dream of right now. 

All of which is as it should be, be¬ 
cause just looking at “The Torso,” a 
million people will feel a new stirring 
of hope. Maybe all those promises 
science makes for a protein diet, 
plenty of sun, exercise and clean 
living, are true after all! 

The End 




HAIR 

OFF 

WITH JOYOUS SPEED 

No More Worry 
About Ugly Hair 


Why worry about that ugly superfluous hair on face 
and lips? No one need ever know if you use Caress. This 
modem, scientific method has helped thousands of 
otherwise lovely women from Hollywood to Miami to 
new happiness and beauty. It is so unique and original 
that it has been granted a U. S. Patent. Just a twist of the 
wrist every few days and you need never see a super¬ 
fluous hair on your face again. No smelly liquid or 
possibly injurious wax or paste. No after stubble—will 
not irritate the skin or stimulate hair growth. 

Wonderful for arms and legs 

Hair off legs, arms, face in just a jiffy or double your 
money back. Send no money. Simply mail coupon below. 
Comes in plain wrapper. On arrival, pay postman $ 1.49 
plus postage for deluxe package. Pay no tax. If cash 
accompanies order, we pay postage. Rush coupon today. 


SeoH-Nelson Co., Box 109-F 

116 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago 3, III. 

I Please send me a CARESS Home Treatment for 
superfluous hair. I'll pay postman $1.49 plus 
postage. If I am not satisfied after 7 days, I'll 

I return it for refund of double my purchase price. 
(If you send cash we pay postage.) 

Name . 

Address . 

| Oty . State .- 



Be Your Own MUSIC Teacher 

LEARN AT HOME FOR LESS THAN 7c A DAY 


Simple as A-B-C. Your lessons consist of real selections, in¬ 
stead of tiresome exercises. You read real notes—no 
“numbers” or trick music. Some of our 750,000 students 
are band LEADERS. Everything is in print and pictures. 
First you are told what to do. Then a picture shows you 
how. Soon you may become an excellent musician. 

Mail coupon for our illustrated Free Book - 

and Print and Picture Sample. Mention 

S our favorite instrument. U. S. School of 
lusic, 1583 Brunswick Bldg., N.Y. 10, N.Y. 

U. S. School of Music, 1583 Brunswick Bldg., N. Y. 10, N. Y. 


. FREE 
BOOKLET 


Please send me Free Booklet and Print and Picture Sample. 
I would like to play (Name Instrument). 


Instrument.. 


Have you 
Instrument?. 


Name 


(Please Print) 


Address. 



CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN 


u SM's” (pronounced S-Ems] are available only through 
properly licensed pharmacists. Never sold by mail or mail 
order houses. Consult your physician — purchase from 
your pharmacy.♦ * * S. M. Laboratories* Seattle i,\Vash. 


Johnny Coy—Para, dancing boy—brought Movieland's editor, Doris Cline, up to date on her 
recent trip to L A _ . His popularity has jumped by leaps and bounds in pics like "Ladies Man." 


101 


































02 



An attractive full Bust Line is a short cut to 
glamour, poise and self-assurance. If your Bust 
Line makes you self-conscious, try the new 
(special up and out) Peach Cupbra. Use it for 
a week. If you are not delighted, send every¬ 
thing back and your money will be refunded. 
Write now. SEND NO MONEY. Send only 
your name and address and size of your old 
brassiere. (State whether small, medium or 
heavy.) When you get your Peach Cupbra with 
direction booklet, pay postman $1.98 (plus few 
cents postage). (Plain wrapper.) If you wish 
to save postage, send Two Dollars now and we 
pay postage. Read your direction booklet and 
wear your Peach Cupbra for a week. If you are 
not absolutely delighted with your new lovelier 
figure, send it back. It is positively guaranteed 
to please you. Join the hundreds of women who 
enjoy a lovelier figure with Peach Cupbra. 
Please print name and address clearly. 

Write today to Party Peach Co., Dept. 23-C 
72 5th Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 



YOUR LEGS CAN HAVE 
THAT LOVELY LOOK 

MEND HOSE THE ELITE WAY! 

The same type needle used by professionals. 
Get the Elite Run Needle and Snag Needle, for 
a neat, easy mending job ... longer wear from 
your hose. You can mend your |\ 

own hose . . quickly .. neatly. 

Sent with full instructions. 

C.O.D. 



DRAWforMONEY 


Be An 

Trained 


ARTIST ! 

Capable of 

WEEK 


Artists Are 
Earning 

$30-$50-$75 A 

Learn to Draw at Home in 
Your Spare Time for a Fasci¬ 
nating Hobby and Profitable 
Career in Commercial Art. 

It’s interesting and pleasant to 
study Art the W.S.A. way. COM¬ 
MERCIAL ART. DESIGNING. 
CARTOONING all in ONE com¬ 
plete home study course. No 
previous Art experience neces¬ 
sary—hundreds have profited by 
our practical methods since 1914. 
TWO ART OUTFITS furnished. 
Full information in FREE 
BOOK. “Art for Pleasure and Profit” 
—tells all about our course, ser¬ 
vice—and commercial opportuni¬ 
ties for you in Art. Mail coupon 
today. 


and Profit, 
Name_ 


FREE BOOK gives details! 


WASHINGTON SCHOOL OF ART, 

Studio 333C. 111515th St., N.W.. 

Washington (5), D. C. 

Send your free catalog. “Art For Pleasure 
” and full particulars. 


.AGE. 


Address. 
City- 


Zone ( ) 


State 


YOUR PROBLEM AND MINE 

By JANE WYMAN 


EDITOR'S NOTE: We print these let- 
ters, with Jane Wyman's answers to the 
problems presented—but as explained 
in our last issue (February) we regret¬ 
fully announce that Miss Wyman will 
not be able to continue her monthly 
Problem feature. Her G. I. entertain¬ 
ment and studio work committments are 
taking up so much of her time now, that, 
as she says ... "I do not feel that I 
can do justice to the letters received." 


Dear Miss Wyman: 

I am a girl of nineteen and in love with 
a soldier who is home on leave. We want 
to get married. But I have an invalid 
mother of whom I have taken care since 
I was sixteen. I want to get married 
badly, but I don’t want to leave my 
mother. 

What shall I do? Please help me. 

Sally 


Dear Sally: 

I do not know your circumstances, 
so it is difficult to advise you. 

If you have sufficient means to pro¬ 
vide help to take care of your mother, 
and you really love this boy, it would 
seem that there is no reason to delay 
your marriage. 

Since he is in the service, the proba¬ 
bilities are that you could stay with 
your mother until he is released from 
the army. 

Why don’t the three of you talk this 
situation over and see what can be 
worked out? It is a wonderfully un¬ 
selfish attitude to consider the welfare 
of your mother first, but you also have 
a right to happiness, and if your mar¬ 
riage can be arranged without depriv¬ 
ing your mother of proper care, I 
should think she would be glad to ap¬ 
prove of it. 

You remember the old saying, don’t 
you, that when a girl marries, her 
mother does not lose a daughter, she 
gains a son, and, thoughtful as you are, 
this will prove true in your case. 

Much happiness to you, Sally, is my 
wish. 

Sincerely, 

JANE WYMAN 

Dear Jane: 

I have been married for a year. My hus¬ 
band is overseas. Before I married him, 
I was in love with another boy whose 
name is Robert, but he went into the 
service. After that, I started dating Bill 
(my husband), then we got married. 

Now Robert is home and I still love him 
more than I do Bill. No matter how I try 
to forget him, I can’t. I don’t want to hurt 
either one, and I’ve got my family to 
think of. 

Should I write and tell Bill, or wait 
until he comes back? I’m still young (18) 
and have no children. I guess I got the 
idea of getting married because the rest 
of my girl friends were marrying. Hope 
you will answer soon. 

Debbie 


Dear Debbie: 

So many of these war marriages are 
made for the same reason that you 
describe “because the rest of my girl 
friends were marrying!” I hope that 
other girls who read this letter will take 


S S£ Scratching 

Relieve Itch in a Jiffy 

^ Sufferers from the torturing itch 
caused by eczema, pimples, scales, 
scabies, athlete's foot, “factory” itch, 
and other itch troubles, are praising 
cooling, liquid D.D.D. Prescription. 
This time-proved medication—devel¬ 
oped by Dr. D.D.Dennis—positively relieves that cruel, 
burning itch. Greaseless and stainless. Soothes and 
comforts even the most intense itching in a jiffy. A 
35c trial bottle proves its merits or your money back. 
Ask your druggist today for D. D. D. Prescription. 


IT'S EASY TO 
LEARN TO 


WRITE 


The Magazine Institute, a private school owned, oper¬ 
ated, and staffed by successful writers and editors, offers 
an up-to-the-minute course in writing for magazines, 
which makes it easy for beginners to get started in this 
rich field. You work in spare time at home. You may 
concentrate on either fiction or non-fiction. Send today 
for the FREE CATALOG describing the Magazine In¬ 
stitute method. No obligation. 

THE MAGAZINE INSTITUTE, INC., Dept. 603-D 
SO Rockefeller Plaza, Rockefeller Center, New York 20, N.Y. 


WE WILL PAY YOU *25 


For Selling Fifty $1 Assortments 

Great Demand for our Birthday and 
All Occasion Cards. Sell for $1— 
your profit 50c. It costs nothing to 
try—write for samples today. 


MERIT CARD CO., Dept.r^Q 1 CLINTON ST., NEWARK 2, N. ). 



FORTIFY THE FUTURE 


Men and women—Write Now for 
free booklet describing “Collection 
of 137 Plans for Operating a Successful Business of 
Your Own.” Start in full or spare time at home. No 
peddling or house-to-house selling. Booklet sent 
free and without obligation. WRITE TODAY 1 
National Business Enterprises 
Dept. H, 135 Rivington Street 
New York 2, N. Y. 


TOMBSTONES 


DIRECT TO YOU 

Genuine Beautiful Rockdale 
Monuments, Markers. Satis¬ 
faction or MONEY BACK. 

Freight paid. Write for our 

FREE Catalog and compare prices. _ 

ROCKDALE MONUMENT CO. 

Dept. 725 JOLIET 




ILLINOIS 



As an INTRODUCTORY OFFER 
we will send you a beautiful 
HAND COLORED Professional 
Enlargement FREE with your 
order of six BLACK & WHITE 
ENLARGEMENTS. Six 5x7 for 
$2.04 or six 8x10 enlargements 
for $2.64. Single enlargement 
5x7 costs 39c or 8x10 49c. Mail 
your photo, snapshot or negative 
(any size) mother, father, sister, 
soldier, group pictures, etc. Your 
original will be returned un¬ 
harmed. State color of eyes, 
hair, and clothing. Mail Money Order or War 
Stamps, or pay postman on arrival plus a few cents 
postage. 

MAX CHINKES, Photographer (Dept. H) 
1697 Broadway New York 19, N. Y. 



Look for your 
March 

PAGEANT 

at your local 
newsstand 




















































a lesson from it and save themselves 
and other boys similar hurts. 

My heart aches for Bill, for surely 
you must have told him you loved him 
when you married him, and you must 
have believed it yourself at the time. 
You entered into this marriage of your 
own free will, and the only fair thing 
to do is to give Bill a chance. 

Robert is right there on the ground 
now, which gives him the advantage. 
Wait until Bill gets back and see how 
you feel. To write him such news is 
like dealing him a blow below the belt. 

JANE WYMAN 


Dear Miss Wyman: 

Two years ago, I sent the man I love 
away—thinking I loved him for his money 
only. It all happened because we were 
arguing bitterly about people being deceit¬ 
ful. I was tired of his continual preaching, 
and in a moment of fury, I told him I 
loved him only for what I could get out 
of him. 

I did not hear from him for over 14 
months, but not long ago I received a let¬ 
ter from him in which he asked me to 
forgive him for being suspicious of me. 
He wrote that had he been trusting instead 
of always looking for signs of deceit, we 
never would have quarreled. 

I really love him and know he still 
loves me. He wants me to plan on our 
being married when he returns from 
overseas. I’d love to start planning for 
our wedding but can’t seem to forget the 
hurt look on his face when I flung out at 
him that I did not love him for himself. 

Both our families are looking forward 
to our getting married. If only I were 
sure he had forgiven me, I could go ahead 
with our plans, but he has never men¬ 
tioned forgiving me, just that I forgive 
him. 

I can’t write and ask him if he has 
forgiven me—I’m afraid he hasn’t, and 
I just couldn’t marry him if that were the 
case, for that incident would cause a 
barrier of distrust between us. Please 
help me. 

Norma 

Dear Norma: 

Because your conscience has hurt 
you for voicing that searing, untrue 
statement, you are building it up all 
out of proportion to its importance. 

Your friend has evidently recog¬ 
nized the truth—that because he goaded 
you on, you struck out with the inten¬ 
tion of hurting him in return, and he 
has accepted the blame and is apolo¬ 
gizing for it by asking your forgiveness. 

It is not logical that he would ask 
you to marry him, if he had not for¬ 
given you, or believed what you said 
in anger. 

Try to put the whole unpleasant in¬ 
cident out of your mind, and start 
afresh as he seems willing to do. No 
good can come of raking up the embers 
of a past quarrel, it will only start an¬ 
other conflagration. 

Since he is offering you love and 
marriage—and that is what you wish— 
take the happiness that is in your 
grasp. By your actions, prove your love 
for him, and the ghost of that hurt 
look will be exercised by the beaming 
countenance he then will wear. 

JANE WYMAN 


Dear Miss Wyman: 

I have a problem and don’t know quite 
which way to turn, so am writing to you. 

Two years ago my son, a Lieutenant in 
the Army, was stationed in a town where 
he met a girl, and a short time later, 
married her. He brought her home on 
a visit and we liked her very much. 

Shortly after this visit he was sent over¬ 


seas, and then last June was shot down 
and taken a prisoner by the Germans. 

We were very happy when his wife 
came west to spend Thanksgiving and 
Christmas with us. However, after being 
with us for just a little while, she started 
drinking excessively and going out with 
any man she could pick up. Around the 
first of this year, she left with some man 
and I haven’t seen her since. Different 
people have told me about seeing her in a 
nearby town. 

Now that we have achieved victory in 
Europe, we expect our son home soon, 
and we don’t know what to do about this 
girl. I hate to tell him about these things, 
and yet I know she isn’t a fit wife for him. 

Shall I write him before he has a chance 
to be with her; shall I wait until he comes 
home; or do you think I should not men¬ 
tion it and go on as if nothing has hap¬ 
pened? In that event, however, someone 
in town would be bound to tell him. It 
would break my heart to tell him myself. 
I thought perhaps I could have his brother 
tell him. 

Helga 

Dear Helga: 

There are so many missing facts in 
your problem that it makes it difficult 
for me to advise you. 

You do not say whether you have 
been able to keep in contact with your 
son, nor what his physical condition is 
at present, nor whether his wife has 
kept in touch with him. Likewise, you 
do not say whether she intends to go 
back to him. It may be, that since you 
know the story of her conduct, she will 
not even try to contact him when he 
gets back. 

Of one thing I am sure—I would not 
write him the situation. My advice is 
to wait until he returns and you see how 
he is and find out what his wife in¬ 
tends to do. 

I know just how you feel, and my 
sympathy goes out to you, but I want 
also to remind you that in such cases, 
the bearer of such news usually gets 
resentment for his pains instead of 
thanks. 

I wish I could help you, but my ad¬ 
vice is that you wait until you see how 
things stand, and be guided accord¬ 
ingly. My best wishes go out to you. 

JANE WYMAN 



Chalk up three dramatic successes for Jane 
Wyman: "Lost Weekend," (Para.), "Night and 
Day," (W.B.), and "The Yearling” (M.G.M.). 


Remove 


iwuwnted 


ham with K[ana 

inummA 


Look your loveliest—always. Don't let 
superfluous hair spoil your good times, 
ruin romance and cause others to whis¬ 
per behind your back. NANA, the Superb 
Hair Remover, made entirely of natural 
ingredients, takes off unsightly, unwanted 
hair in a jiffy—without messy heat—and 
leaves your skin so clean you can wear the 
finest gowns, the scantiest bathing suits, the 
sheerest stockings, or no stockings at all. 
You apply NANA cold, directly from the 
jar, ana simply, with one quick twist of 
the wrist, the unsightly hair is off! 

30-DAY UNCONDITIONAL GUARANTEE 

NANA is made from pure, natural ingredi¬ 
ents—no smelly sulphide or chemicals. 
Will not spoil. NO UNPLEASANT ODOR. 
NANA is not a bleach, sandpaper, razxjr 
or clipper—no “shaved-off” look. Simply 
press NANA on spots where unsightly 
hair grows. With quick twist of the 
wrist the hair is removed from face, fore¬ 
arms. legs and back of neck—so clean it 
takes comparatively longer to grow back. 
Regrowth Is not stubby. 

SEND NO MONEY $g&„S at S3 t &. 

Pay postman only $2.00 plus postage 
(We pay the Federal Cosmetics War Tax) 
on delivery. Try NANA 30 days. If not 
delighted, return unused portion and we 
will promptly refund money you paid 
us. Mail coupon. 

S. J. WEGMAN COMPANY 
1 East 45th Street. Dept. B-152 
New York 17, N. Y. 



tm i 

l 


a S. J. WEGMAN COMPANY. Dept, B-152 

■ 9 E. 45th St., NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 

■ Please rush jar of NANA—the Superb Hair Remover * 
| in PLAIN PACKAGE on 30-DAY Money-BACK Guar- I 
a anteed Trial. I will pay postman $2.00 plus postage a 
J (Federal Cosmetics War Tax included) on delivery. J 

| Name. | 

I Address. I 

! City...Zone.State. J 

NANA Hair Remover is obtainable only from us, 

mmmm — ••■■■■■.( 



CACTUS GARDEN 

COMES IN BEAUTIFUL 4-COLOR 
WATERPROOF PERMANENT BOX 

Imagine, complete with striking window 
garden box. 10 healthy Cactus plants—all 
different varieties, all bloom—can now be 
sold direct to you at this amazing low price 
because of shipping difficulties to stores! Order 
now ... save on this opportunity! 



FUFF Lovely hand-painted Mexican pot for window 
■ ** *- sill with columnar grower Lace Cactus blooms 
In purple, pink, red and yellow flowers. Gift to prompt 
orders! Hurry—send today. SEND NO MONEY—OR¬ 
DER NOW—PAY LATER. Or mail $1.69 with order, wo 
pay postage. Satisfaction guaranteed or money back Send 
name and address to PAN AMERICAN CACTUS CO.,Dept 

6-1408, 148 Monroe Ave., N.W., Grand Rapids 2. Mich. 


^/Nadinola's 4-way action be/p you 
C £XT£RNAU.y CAUSED PIMPLES 
tOOSEAt BLACKHEADS 
SvDULL,DARK SKIN 

Don't give in to unlovely skin! Try famous 
Nadinola Cream, used and praised by thou¬ 
sands of lovely women. Nadinola is a 4-way 
treatment cream that helps to lighten and 
brighten dark, dull skin—clear up externally 
caused pimples—fade freckles—loosen and 
remove blackheads. Its special medicated 
ingredients help to clear and freshen your 
skin—to make it feel softer, look smoother. 
Buy Nadinola Cream today and use as di¬ 
rected. A single treatment-size jar is posi¬ 
tively guaranteed to improve your complexion 
or your money back! Only 55c at drug and 
toilet counters; trial size 10c. Also— 


• SEND FOR FREE ILLUSTRATED BOOKLET* 


5 i 




NADINOLA, Dept. 70, Pans Tennessee 

Send me free and postpaid your new deluxe edi¬ 
tion Beauty Booklet, richly printed in full color, 
with actual photographs and sworn proof of the 
wonderful results from just one jar of Nadinola. 

Name. 

Address. 

City..State. ... 


!• 


103 




























Don’t Be Flat! 

YOU CAN HAVE A GLAMOROUS 
BUSTLINE —Instantly 

Flatter your figure with PYRAMID SNAP-ONS. These 
dainty, lace-trimmed bust pads give you a lift where you 
need it most. They give you those well-developed, beau¬ 
tifully soft curves men admire—making you proud of your 
alluring, glamorous figure. Fit into the cup of any bras¬ 
siere. Just snap them on—they stay put. Wear them in 
complete comfort all day—they're your own personal secret 
of charm and poise. No need to be embarrassed. Order 
PYRAMID SNAP-ONS by mail direct from us. Send $1.98 
in full payment (or order C.O.D. plus postage). Shipped 
promptly in plain wrapper. We GUARANTEE that you 
must be delighted with this new aid to instant allurement, 
or we will refund your money promptly. ARLESA MFG. CO., 
Dept. B-3, Box 372, Church St., Annex Sta., N.Y. 8, N.Y. 



Lovely House Dresses 

2 x $ 3 69 

Yes, lovely dresses that are so hard to 
find at this time. Colorful cottons . . . 
easy to wash, easy to iron! Comfortable, 
youthful, easy-to-slip-into! Spacious 
pockets! You’ll fall in love with these 
dresses. But the big surprise is the price. 
Yes. 2 dresses for only $3.69—far less 
than you ever thought possible. Sizes 
14 to 20 and 40 to 46. In ordering, state 
size desired. Enclose $1.00 deposit, bal¬ 
ance C.O.D. plus postage. We GUAR¬ 
ANTEE you must be delighted or we will 
refund the purchase price. 

L> & S TRADING CO., Dept. H-3 
P.O. Box 75. Station Y, Brooklyn 4, N. Y. 




WATCH THE DANGER AREAS 


Little tell-tale wrinkles often appear 
in the danger areas where the skin 
is thinnest, as around the eyes, 
mouth, and throat . . . especially when 
the skin is deficient in natural oils. To 
help lubricate the skin and make those 
little tell-tale wrinkles temporarily less 
apparent, use the new improved ESTROBALM ^ 
with massage. Makes the skin appear softer, smoother 
more youthful. Contains real Turtle Oil with the new 
scientific discovery Estrogenic Hormones and other in¬ 
gredients readily absorbed by the skin, and recognized by 
many beauty experts as excellent skin aids. No wonder 
thousands of happy users throughout the country recommend 
Estrobalm. Order Estrobalm today. Complete with I 11 - 
struction Booklet. 2 -oz. jar $2.00. 6-oz. jar $5.00. 1-pound 
jar $10.00. (Postage additional on C.O.D. orders.) Satis¬ 
faction guaranteed or purchase price refunded. 

VITAMIN SALES CO. 

79 De Kalb Ave., Dept. 611-C, Brooklyn 1, N. Y. 


FREE 

ENLARGEMENT 

Just to get acquainted, we will beautifully 
enlarge your favorite snapshot, photo, 
kodak picture, print or negative to 5x7 inches 
absolutely FREE if you enclose this ad. Please 
include color of hair and eyes and get our new 
Bargain Offer, giving you your choice of hand¬ 
some frames with a second enlargement beau¬ 
tifully hand tinted in natural lifelike colors and 
sent on approval. Your original returned with 
your enlargement. Send today. DEAN STUDIOS, 
Dept. 798, 118 N. 15th St., Omaha, Nebraska 


SWOON MAN 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 53J 


of 1902. Clearly a new menace had to 
be manufactured; Mr. Gould came up 
with a lulu: Splitface. 

RKO had, under contract, precisely 
the man to play Splitface: 258 pound, 
6'5" Mike Mazurki, an enterprising 
pug who once wrestled a 500 lb. bear, 
and won. Mike was snatched into the 
Makeup Department for purposes of 
beautification in reverse. 

At the time, Mike was planning to 
be married, so he had undergone 
plastic surgery to correct a cauliflow¬ 
er ear. Before this was done, how¬ 
ever, the makeup department had 
made a cast of the battered member 
and had duplicated it in plastic. So, 
the first step in turning a peaceful 
wrestler into a desperate thug was to 
return, by artificial means, his dam¬ 
aged aural equipment to his camera 
profile. 

Said Mr. Mazurki on the set, “I’m 
probably the only man on earth, who, 
in case some lug should say, ‘Friends, 
Romans, Countrymen, lend me your 
ears,’ could pull off a plastic cauli¬ 
flower ear, and hand it over.” 

The next step in making Mike Ma¬ 
zurki a sight to cause Tess Trueheart 
to faint on instant meeting, was to 
add a welted scar running from fore¬ 
head to chin. They say around RKO 
that the projectionist who ran off the 
tests of Mazurki in this makeup, em¬ 
erged white-faced from the ordeal, 
hastened to the set where Boris Kar¬ 
loff was working in “Touch of Bed¬ 
lam,” and said derisively to that 
astonished gentleman, “From now on 
you’re just Dolly Dimples around 
here.” 

Eric Taylor, ace screen writer at 
RKO, was given a gander at Split- 
face’s test and told to proceed with 
preparing a script. He didn’t need to 
do any research on Dick Tracy be¬ 
cause he had long been an avid fan. 

In short order he handed over a 
story starting with the mysterious 
murder of an inoffensive school teach¬ 
er; two additional murders follow 
grimly, the third being that of a mor¬ 
tician whose instruments are used in 
committing the slaughter. Before the 
tangle is solved, Tess Trueheart is 
kidnapped, and is followed by Junior, 
Dick Tracy’s 11-year-old adopted son. 
Junior (he practiced this stunt in a 
previous comic strip) clings to the 
bumper of the kidnap car and drops 
pieces of his clothing as clues to lead 
Dick to one of the most gruesome 
hideouts imaginable. It must have 
been winter, because Junior sheds a 
nice array of haberdashery without 
getting arrested by the Hays office. 

RKO, sitting pretty with an ugly 
menace, an ingenious script, a beau¬ 
tiful heroine (Anne Jeffreys plays 
Trueheart), a smart little brother 
(Mickey Kuhn plays Junior), had 
only one problem left to solve. Who 
should create the role of the dauntless 
Dick himself? 

He needed to be a six-footer; he 
needed to be rangy, but athletically 
lean—170 to 180 pounds; he needed 
to be a composite of what Americans 
regard as the typical big city officer. 
You will be astounded to know that 
RKO had precisely the right man 
under contract: Morgan Conway. 

The name of Morgan Conway may 
be new, but when you see him on the 
screen as Tracy, the face will be fa¬ 


miliar. He has worked in more than 
twenty pictures and has appeared in 
nearly as many stage plays. Not al¬ 
ways has he been on the Tracy side 
of crime either; to be candid, Mr. 
Conway has done plenty of time as a 
motion picture malefactor. He has 
been shot, stabbed, drowned, and en¬ 
cased in concrete to provide proof 
that, on some days, a man can’t save 
a single dime. 

Mr. Conway had no original inten¬ 
tion of becoming an actor. When his 
father died, (Morgan was 14 at the 
time and had been entered as a stu¬ 
dent at Seton Hall Prep School) 
Morgan had to abandon his daytime 
education and get a job. He went to 
school at night to complete his prep 
work, and afterward continued in 
night law school. 

He had learned that, to become a 
member of the F.B.I., a man must 
have earned a law degree or certifi¬ 
cation as a public accountant, or to 
possess some other technical accom¬ 
plishment. Item: the current por¬ 
trayer of Dick Tracy actually yenned 
as a young’un to be a G-man. 

However, Morgan’s daytime life in 
the real estate business became so 
successful that he dropped his eve¬ 
ning studies, and with them his chance 
to work for J. Edgar Hoover. It was 
at this time that our future Dick 
Tracy had his first brush with the 
gentry who make police departments 
necessary. 

Morgan was living in a suburb some 
distance from New York. One snowy 
night, he stepped off the bus and 
glanced down the silent, winter street. 
Directly above the intersection there 
was one valiant light, but even with 
the refraction from the whitened 
earth, illumination extended only a 
quarter of the distance down the 
block. In the foggy distance the faint¬ 
est of glows signified the presence of 
another street lamp. 

Because the storm, continued for 
three days until that morning, had 
been very heavy, an A had been drag¬ 
ged down the street. This had thrown 
up a four-foot rampart as a winter 
hedge along the curbing. A subse¬ 
quent snowfall had powdered the 
street, the trees, even the sidewalls. 
One’s footsteps were muffled by the 
foamsoft carpet so that one walked 
along the street like the accursed 
dead, weightless in a shrouded world. 

Morgan shuddered, partly from the 
thought, partly from the chill. It was 
then that he noticed another man 
across the street. The black hat of 
the man was pulled low over his eyes, 
his thick topcoat was turned up 
around his neck. His movement was 
purposeful, but furtive as he tramped 
over the snowbank on his side of the 
road, and marched toward Conway. 
“I’m going to be held up,” thought 
our not-yet detective. Under his pearl 
grey gloves, he was wearing an ex- : 
tremely valuable diamond ring. He 
was wearing also a handsome watch, 
and he was carrying a satisfactory 
amount of currency. 

But he thought, “The guy’s got the ■ 
drop on me; there isn’t anything I 
can do—unless I can slip off my glove 
in my pocket, slip out of the ring, 
and get my hand back into the glove ■ 
before he gets here.” 

He stopped, deliberately turned to 
face his antagonist, and slid his hand 
into his overcoat pocket. The man 
stopped; if he had been a car, his 
brakes would have made his tires 
sing. Then he turned and ran head¬ 
long down the middle of the street. ; 


104 



















I 


A BOOR 

THAT 

SHOWS 

YOU 

^J4ou 

to 

^becorate 

Vlour 

Own 



'—** very woman her own decorator and 
every home a dream home! It’s easy if 
you will follow the ideas given in HOW 
TO BE YOUR OWN DECORATOR by 
Helen Koues (former head of home dec¬ 
orating division of GOOD HOUSEKEEP¬ 
ING MAGAZINE). This brand-new book 
gives you hundreds of plans and sugges¬ 
tions on how to choose and buy, combine 
and arrange furniture and accessories 
for every room and nook in the house. 
Tells you what is good furniture and taste 
(and why), what goes with what and 
how to get a full dollar’s value for every 
dollar spent. 

Explains how to recognize at a glance 
the traditional periods of furniture—such 
as Gothic, Queen Anne, Georgian, Early 
American, Louis XIV, English Regency, 


etc., and how to live with them. And for 
you innovators, there is a complete sec¬ 
tion on Modem Furniture and Decora¬ 
tion, with information on unusual colors, 
striking use of space and light, combin¬ 
ing traditional with modem, unusual ar¬ 
rangements, functional pieces, etc. 

It is lavish in guidance and illustra¬ 
tion on every decorating problem, from 
painting the walls to covering the floors. 
Whether it’s Panelling, Mirrors, Lamps, 
Hardware, Mantels, Decorative Acces¬ 
sories, unusual Ceiling treatments, se¬ 
lection of Curtains and Drapes, decorat¬ 
ing unusually shaped rooms, adding 
built-in features for more comfort, 
matching your Draperies, Slip-Covers 
or Bed-Spreads (even instruction on 
making them yourself) — the author 
hasn’t missed or omitted a trick. 




Here are pictures, ideas and directions for you to use to solve every decorating problem 


Adam Chair 
Georgian Period 


Windsor Chair 
Early American 


Hepplewhite Shield 
English 1785 


Sheraton Chair 
American 1800 


Regency Chair 
English Period 


Chippendale Chair 
18th Century Period 



SHOWS HOW YOU CAN FURNISH OR RE¬ 
DECORATE A HOUSE OR APARTMENT IN 
THESE INSTRUCTIVE CHAPTERS: 


• The New Approach to 
Decorating 

• How to Use Period 
Furniture 

• Contemporary and 
Modern Decor 

• Space tor Today's 
Living 

• What to Do With Your 
Walls, Windows and 
Floors 

• Color and Light 

• Decorating for Boys and 
Girls 


• Nurseries and Children's 
Rooms 

• Game and Hobby Rooms 

• Porches and Terraces 

• Powder Rooms and 
Bathrooms 

• Drapes, Covers and 
Bedspreads 

• Built-in Features for 
Better Living 

• Lamps, Pictures and 
Accessories 

• Kitchens, Pantries and 
Dinettes 


and only 


8 V 2 x 11 inches 
128 Pages 
300 Illustrations 
Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your Money Baekl 


Send For This Book! 

Whether you just want to refurnish a room or two—or 
decorate a whole house from top to bottom, see for yourself 
how genuinely helpful this book will be for you. It contains 
128 pages with over 300 photographs and illustrations of out¬ 
standing room arrangements, single pieces, fabrics, wall¬ 
papers, etc., and a valuable guide for color schemes. Send 
only $1.25 (or C.O.D. plus postage). It’s really a remarkable 
value and sold on money-back guarantee. 



KNICKERBOCKER PUB. CO., Dept. T-l 
2 Albany St.. New York 6 . N. Y. 

Send me a copy HOW TO BE YOUR OWN 
DECORATOR by Helen Koues. If not 
completely pleased, I can return book for 
full refund. 

) I enclose 1.25 in full payment 
) Send C.O.D. for 1.25 plus postage 


. State. 


105 










































































BLONDES! 

DARK ROOTS Disappear 
_ INSTANTLY! 



I NSTANTLY you may lighten your 
hair . . . make dark roots disappear! 

You can be a glittering, glamorous 
blonde in a few minutes! Lechler’s 
“569” INSTANT HAIR LIGHTENER 
gives you greater lightening in less 
time. Just apply a delightful cream and watch its in¬ 
stant lightening action. Easy, quick! Leaves hair more 
blonde, more lovely than you’ve ever seen it. Lightens 
scalp, too! With Lechler’s “569” INSTANT HAIR 
LIGHTENER. it is not necessary to add a single drop 
of liquid peiftxide! And you use it in the privacy of your 
own home.) Avoid waiting with bleaching paste on your 
head. Used by millions of women for over 25 years. 
FREE 36-page Booklet for Blondes with your order. 
Sent C.O.D. in plain wrapper for $1.20 (tax included) 
plus postage. We pay postage if you send money with 
order. Mail this “ad” with your name and address to 
HOUSE OF LECHLER, Dept. H-413, 560 BROADWAY, 
NEW YORK 12. N. Y. _ 

^/ect O/lcncdedi 

^ MATERNITY 

-p DRESSES 

The newest in smart Maternity 
Dresses for home and street wear. . 

Darling frocks for comfort and concealing lines. All at« 
surprisingly low prices. A dress for every occasion. 

CDfTCfrotn HOLLYWOOD 

■ 1 New catalog sent upon request in plain 

■ wrapper, free. Write today. 

JANNE OF HOLLYWOOD, Dept. 61, 6071 Hollywood 
Blvd., Hollywood. California._ 




CONFIDENTIAL 

For Movie Fans! 

The private home addresses of 
more than 400 top Hollywood 
motion picture stars in this ex¬ 
clusive directory. Send for it now! 
Enclose $1 in currency or money 
order. 

Movie Star Directory 
P. O. Box 3068-D 
Hollywood (28). Calif. 


MOVIE STAR’S PHOTOS 



VAN JOHNSON 


from the photo studio 
that makes pictures /or 
the movie stars. 

Exact duplicates of the 
same highest quality 
photos that we supply 
to movie stars, can now 
be yours. 

LARGE 8" x 
10" size of 
your favorite 
star. State 
second choice. 


25 ' 

ea.; 


eneE —Catalog of miniature photos in- 
rncc eluded with each order. 

STEWART-CROXTON STUDIOS Dept. ML 
1408 Westwood Blvd., West Los Angeles 24, Calif. 



106 


Write Today 4 


< 1Ue cHollywoodl Way 

PLASTEEK takes unwanted hair OUT—not 
off—easily, quickly—in the privacy of your 
own home. Used by exclusive Hollywood 
Beauty Salons and women all over America. 
Different from any other product. Applied 
cold. No mess. No unpleasant odor. No 
poisonous chemicals. Only pure, natural in* 
gredients. Safe enough to eat. Write for full 
details. No obligation. 

Swlf# 731-A 
108 W. 6th St. 
Los Angeles14 
California 


PLASTEEK 


His agility was spectacular, consider¬ 
ing the hindrance of the thick snow 
and the weight of his clothing. 

A dumbfounded Morgan Conway 
gazed after the fleeing form. As he 
trudged toward home, he tried to 
figure it out: had the guy actually in¬ 
tended to hold him up, then concluded 
—because of that hand slipped into 
the coat pocket—that Conway was 
armed and had every intention of ven¬ 
tilating his aggressor? Or had the man 
been a stranger, seeking directions, 
and had he been terrified by the rap¬ 
idly-formed idea that, if he ap- 
approached, he would be held up? 

The topic makes a nice after-dinner 
conversational theme; the theories are 
many. Conway sticks to his thesis: he 
scared off a thug—and quite by acci¬ 
dent. 

When the stock market crashed, it 
took real estate values with it, so 
Morgan Conway came to California 
with a half-formed idea of investigat¬ 
ing oil lands. A theatrical friend, who 
had known Morgan in New York, 
said, “Boy, why sink a doubtful shaft 
into the earth, when you can spud 
into some real pay juice at any 
studio?” 

Morgan said, “Why, shore,” and 
went to work in a Spencer Tracy pic¬ 
ture entitled, “Looking For Trouble.” 
This was in 1933, and Morgan was the 
heavy and sinister character who 
ended in the police morgue; a situa¬ 
tion which proves that an enterpris¬ 
ing young man can go from Tracy, 
S. to Tracy, D. in twelve years, mean¬ 
while changing his status from black 
knavery to opalescent rectitude. 

During the remainder of 1933 and 
the first ten months of 1934, Morgan 
lived in Hollywood by dying at var¬ 
ious studios. In one picture, “The 
Spellbinder,” he actually managed to 
play the D. A. 

Then he was cast as Guts Regan 
in a play entitled “The Night Of Jan¬ 
uary 16th.” You probably produced it 
at your High School Drama Festival. 
Tenny rate, the play was originally 
world-premiered in Hollywood and 
ran for three packed weeks; some¬ 
thing super colossal in the film capi¬ 
tal which looks upon live shows as 
a trifle too personalized and present. 
A picture of a play, the belief is, sur¬ 
passes the play itself. But there was 
no denying it, “The Night of January 
16th” was GOOD. The Schuberts 
bought it and made plans to produce 
it on Broadway. However, instead of 
opening in January of 1935, as orig¬ 
inally scheduled, it didn’t open until 
September. Mr. Conway couldn’t wait 
that long for a part; he had taken 
work in another play, but he was able 
to be on hand opening night, and to 
hear the players, the producers, and 
the author cheered for fifteen min¬ 
utes. The man who took that part 
of Guts Regan continued in the part 
for 15 months, then came to Holly¬ 
wood. He has done okay out here, too 
—you may have heard of him: chap 
by the name of Walter Pidgeon. 

Mr. Conway, the fall guy, went 
from one part to the next, thinking 
of the opportunity he had missed. 
Eleven years after Morgan’s first ap¬ 
pearance as Guts Regan, a man 
named Sid Rogell began a search for 
RKO’s cinematic materialization of 
Dick Tracy. Back in memory was 
tucked, for future reference, the per¬ 
formance of Morgan Conway as Re¬ 
gan. Sid Rogell got in touch with the 
actor. He recalled the play; he was 
able to tell Morgan exactly what type 
of suit he had worn on the stage, and 


to describe some of the bits of busi¬ 
ness that Morgan had devised to ex¬ 
plain the character of Regan. 

Moral of this anecdote: in the prac¬ 
tice of mnemonics, an elephant has 
amnesia in comparison with the av¬ 
erage theatrical producer. 

Morgan Conway’s only real life 
activity as a representative of the 
law, occurred during Southern Cali¬ 
fornia’s defense preparation against 
possible invasion or bombing, and al¬ 
most cost him his life. 

He was an air raid warden. You 
may have heard that, in the spring 
of 1942, some binocular-happy chap¬ 
py thought he saw a covey of Jap¬ 
anese planes off the California coast. 
What happened next is history of 
the sort that causes the local Cham¬ 
ber of Commerce humiliated blushes. 
The coast artillery laid on with every¬ 
thing at its command. Rumors flashed 
around that a Jap plane had landed 
in a local street. A blackout was im¬ 
posed (two car loads of utility com¬ 
pany employees, ordered to turn off 
ornamental lighting around town, 
were arrested and tossed in the local 
jug on the suspicion of being dan¬ 
gerous characters; the lights were ex¬ 
tinguished by zealous citizens, using 
rocks, bottles, and .22’s). If this gives 
you the impression that chaos, con¬ 
fusion, and general hysteria was as 
thick as fog, you’re being charitable. 

Morgan Conway, awakened out of 
a sound sleep by his area commander, 
popped into a pair of shoes, a pair of 
trousers, and a dark raincoat. He 
grabbed his flashlight, but forgot his 
identifying armband and his white 
helmet. 

Having taken up his post at one of 
Hollywood’s blackest intersections, he 
was horrified to see a car approaching 
with lights blazing. It was clear that 
the driver, if a reputable citizen, had 
attended a late party and simply 
hadn’t been informed that a blackout 
was in effect. 

So Warden Conway stepped into 
path of the car and flagged the driver 
to the curb, with an explanation. 
Afterward, Morgan learned that the 
driver was Johnny Mercer. “You took 
an awful chance,” said Mr. Mercer. 
“I thought for a second that you were 
a stick-up and I was figuring on 
some fast way to deal with you.” 

Incidentally, Morgan’s second flirta¬ 
tion with bodily harm took place on 
his return from Chicago where he 
met Chester Gould (the Dick Tracy 
creator) and was told exactly how 
Breathless would meet her fate. But 
the understanding was that under no 
circumstances was he to reveal this 
secret. The crew at RKO spent hours 
devising means of torture to make 
Dick Tracy confess. He never did. 

Morgan Conway is somewhat in¬ 
clined to take his new status as the 
country’s favorite legal light serious¬ 
ly. Tracy, in the comic strip, does not 
smoke or drink; Morgan does both 
with great moderation, but he thinks 
possibly his publicity should insist 
that he does not, and he believes 
honestly that he would be better off 
if he were a total abstainer. He thinks 
kids should spend their money on 
books instead of cigarettes, and he 
insists that everyone should go to 
Sunday School and Church. 

RKO plans, at present, to produce 
about four Tracy pictures per year, 
but already letters are pouring in, 
asking for one every two months. The 
question is: Could the script writers, 
Mr. Gould, Dick Tracy and Morgan 
Conway stand the pace? 










CHEN YU 



MRKE UP 



We invite you to accept 15 days of startling new beauty 


LIGHT LOTUS NO. 3 


LIGHT LOTUS NO. 


Choose the shaile you would like — send the coupon 


Now . . . one of your fondest dreams becomes a beautiful reality. A flawless complexion 
of enticing silken beauty can be yours. With Chen Yu Cloud silk Make Up, you 
instantly create an entirely new complexion . . . one as soft and as smooth 
to touch as rarest silk ... as perfect to look upon as finest porcelain. 

Blemishes and imperfections become your secret alone! Yet, so 
utterly natural is the illusion created by Cloud silk, others never 
suspect you of wearing make-up at all. And the shades— 
oh! so lovely . . . and nine to 




PEACH PETAL NO. 2 


PEACH PETAL NO. 








TEA TAN NO. 1 


PEACH PETAL NO. 3 




W 


choose from. Select from this 
page one of the nine you 
would like to try— 
then mark the 
coupon for that 
shade and mail it 
at once. We’ll send 

vou a 15-day cake of Cloud 

^ * 

silk. Startling new beauty awaits 
you! Send the coupon now. 


TEA TAN NO. 3 


TEA TAN NO. 2 



I- 

| Chen Yu Inc. 


200 E. Illinois St., Dept. HWG-3, Chicago (11), III. 

□ Send me a 15-day sample size of Chen Yu Cloud silk MakeUp. I enclose twenty-fm 
cents (25c) to cover cost of packing, mailing and Government tax. 

□ For an additional 25c, enclosed, please send me a harmonizing shade of newCloud silk lipstick 


□ LIGHT LOTUS NO. 

□ LIGHT LOTUS NO. 

□ LIGHT LOTUS NO. 


PEACH PETAL NO. 1 
PEACH PETAL NO. 2 
PEACH PETAL NO. 3 


□ TEA TAN NO. 

□ TEA TAN NO. 


□ TEA TAN NO. 


Name 
Si reel 


City 


State 


(This Offer Good in U. S. A. Only) 



















TOM DRAKE 


: J fianne ^ rain ’ Peter 1**^. Joan Waine ’ Re * * aiT ‘ son 


APRIL 
15 CENTS 










-* ^ . 


aVSSM*- 


'~z, hi/;if, ■ •* v* • 

■ •.. *?,# • ■. -. v 










' .< 


mmmm 








mMmMm 




wmm 1 




*. 


-S' 


v \ ' 

Jfeg 


V' 






-I 








*■**» 


IR 


v- 




*r» 






wm 











FEB 21 W 


o other shampoo 


leawes wour hair 


so lustrous, ^et so 


eas^ to manage! 


For “He loves me knots,” remember this: 

He’ll adore your topknots, curls or s\\ iris 
when your hair is Drene-lovely! 

Drene your hair and it shines 
with all its natural beauty. 

Today’s Drene with Hair Conditioning action 
leaves your hair silkier, smoother, easier to manage. 
"After your Drene shampoo, try a new hairdo 
for Spring,” says Jerry Courtney, 
famous Cover Girl and Drene Girl. 
“There’s nothing like a becoming new hairfix 
to boost your spirits any time!” 

You'll love the way Drene with Hair Conditioning, 
action leaves your hair so beautifully behaved. 
Jerry shows you these easy-to-fix Drene styles 
you can try at home or ask your beauty 
shop to do. First insist on Drene Shampoo 
with Hair Conditioning action. 

No other shampoo leaves your hair 
so lustrous, yet so easy to manage. 


Sh cimpoo with 
Hair Conditioning Action- 


QUETS TO YOU when you turn a center-part page¬ 
boy into this full chignon with just a jeweled barrette. 

1 his hairdo is so easy to fix,” Jerry explains, "right alter 
your Drene shampoo.’ Drene with Hair Conditioning ac¬ 
tion leaves your hair beautifully behaved. You’ll find, too, a 
good permanent helps keep page-boy rolls neatly in place. 


A YOU don’t NEED DAISIES to tell you he loves you . . . with 
your hair swept up in this tilted topknot. "See how Drene brings 
out all the natural sheen of my dark hair,” says Jerry. As much as 
33 [iercent more lustre than any soap or soap shampoo. Since 
Drene is not a soap shampoo, it never leaves any drab film on hair 
as all soaps do. And the very first time you Drene your hair, you 
completely remove unsightly dandruff'. 











'©Cl 8 


9661 


M 


1 








anJiaul as ***» “’ft 

T /«»•• beV °" eS«*- ** ’"*••■ 

-v -» %sz*~ «•.* rr£ 

“ d ■ •' „ lovelier. vib „„.lV *^,^1, 

„» were never to been to tto* olgM 

r floress, ndv ,,. neV er » e " an d every 

- ° f nd vou kno>v yo«» ° every day . * • 

ace and y u ’\\ rvear 

■ent lipstick- 
for him-' 



So w*a> your 
toiletries counter 
may not have it. Ask 
your druggist or get it at 
Crown Drugs, Gallahers, 
Gray’s, Jacob’s Pharmacy, 
Sun Drug Co., Sun-Ray- 
Nevins, Thrifty Drug, 
Walgreen’s, Whelan’s. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or money back. 






I 

V-. 

1 


■■ • ■■ 


MMHH 


CHECK 


FLORESS, DEPT. 3-H, 215 N. MICHIGAN, CHICAGO 1, ILL. 
*In Canada: Floress, Dept. 3-H, 22 College St., Toronto 

Send me two trial sizes (a full month’s supply) of fabulous 
FLORESS, the fluorescent, lovelight lipstick, in shades checked 


Pink 

Passion 

at left. I enclose 25^ in coin to cover all charges, including ta\ 
Check here Q if you wish all 5 shades for 50£. 

Neon 

Check here for 



Red 

Scarlet 

Sequin 

□ REGULAR $1 SIZE 

in beautiful all metal 
brass swivel case. 


(Print Plainly) 

Twilight 

Fuchsia 

□ I enclose $1.20 tax 
included. 

f!itv 

Zone Slate- 

Blue 

Flame 

□ Send C.O.D. $1.20 
Plus Postage. 

*In Canada: Large Size is $1.35— 
C.O.D.’s Accepted 





























★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 

★ 






Several years ago, a great 
novel blazed its way into 
America’s consciousness 
—James M. Cain’s ‘The 
Postman Always Rings 
Twice”. It was dialogue 
like this that held you: 
“I love you, Cora. But 
love, when you get fear in 
it, isn’t love any more. 
It’s hate!” 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

At the time, many of us hoped it would 
be made into a motion picture. But the 
general opinion was: “Too daring... 
too shocking...” Remember this scene: 
“Tomorrow night, if I come back, there’ll 
be kisses ... lovely ones, Frank! Kisses 
with dreams in them .. 

Recently, Met- 
ro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer an¬ 
nounced that 
it had produc- 
ed“ThePost- 
man Always 
Rings Twice”, 
starring Lana 
Turner and 
John Garfield. 

And everyone 
wondered how M-G-M would handle 
the more audacious scenes, like this 
one: “We had all that love out there, that 
night.. .and we kissed and sealed it so 
it would be ours forever!” 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

Well, we have just seen the picture— 
and Lana Turner is breathtakingly 
beautiful as the temptress who is swept 
away by a love she can’t deny. John 
Garfield, more vital than ever, turns in 
a masterful performance as the reckless 
young wanderer who wanted love more 
than he wanted life. 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

Together, as Cora and Frank, they cre¬ 
ate one of the most memorable romances 
ever brought to the screen. And to 
match this great acting, there is a truly 
fine supporting cast including Cecil 
Kellaway, Hume Cronyn, Leon Ames, 
Audrey Totter, and Alan Reed. 

★ ★ ★ ★ 

Congratulations are most certainly in 
order for Director Tay Garnett, Pro¬ 
ducer Carey Wilson, and Screenplay- 
men Harry Ruskin 
and Niven Busch. 

★ ★ ★ 

Whether the Post¬ 
man rings once, or the 
Postman rings twice, 

M-G-M has certainly 
rung the bell with 
this one. 

—-Uea 









Stances i 

29 A New Joan Fontaine? 

By Jim Lunt 

31... . The Kid From Indiana 
(Dick Crane) 
by Adelaide Curran 

33.Starbound (Rhonda 

Fleming) 

By Alice L. Tildesley 

36 .All the Things She Is 

(Vivian Blaine) 

By Avery Carroll 

38 .For Pete’s Sake (Peter 

Lawford) 

By Dorothy B. Haas 


43. From London to Siam . . . 
Via Hollywood (Rex 
Harrison) 

By Katherine Lake 


47 .It’s Love, Love, Love 

(Jeanne Crain) 

By Fredda Dudley 

48 Who’s New (Kirk Douglas) 

By Mickell Novak 

51 Alias Agnes Moorehead 

By Dorothy Deere 

53 Data on (Tom) Drake 

By Joan Michaels 

57 The Remarkable “Mac” 

(Fred MacMurray) 

By Marcia Daughtrey 


30 Dick Crane 

32 Rhonda Fleming 

34 .Van Johnson 

37 Vivian Blaine 

39 Peter Lawford 

42 Rex Harrison 

46 . Jeanne Crain 

56.Fred MacMurray 


12 So Proudly We Hail 

16 This Was Hollywood 

27 Meet the People 

35 Van Mail (Van Johnson) 
44 Horse Laughs 

55 Message from Marsha 

(Hunt) 

61 .Reading from Writing 

(Ray Milland) 

By Helen King 
82 As You Like It 


Defia/itmetttd 


6. Inside Hollywood 

By Fredda Dudley 
14 Movieland’s New Picture 

Guide 

18 Letters to the Editor 

20 Pictures in Production 

22 Movieland’s Crossword 

Puzzle 

24 .Is It An Act? 

By Shirley Cook 
59 Words of Music 

By Jill Warren 


DORIS CLINE, Editor HELEN LIMKE, Hollywood Editor 

PEG NICHOLS, Assistant Editor ART CARTER, Staff Photographer 

BOB BECKER, Art Editor ROBERT CROSSETT, Ass’t Art Ed. 


MOVIELAND, published monthly by Movieland, Inc., at Dunellen, N. J Advertising 
editorial offices, 535 Fifth Avenue, New York 17, N. Y. Hollywood editorial office- 9126 
Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles 46, California. Chicago advertising office: 333 No Michi¬ 
gan Avenue, Chicago, Ill. Vol. 4, No. 3, April, 1946. Entered as second class matter 
December 15, 1942, at the post office at Dunellen, N. J., under the Act of March 3 1879 
Price 15c a copy. Subscription price $1.80 in the United States and $1.80 in Canada 
VCopyright 1946 by Movieland Inc. The publishers accept no responsibility for un¬ 
solicited manuscripts, and all manuscripts should be accompanied by a stamped self- 
addressed envelope. Printed in the United States of America. Price 15c a copy in Canada. 
MEMBER AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS 



4 























































I/*' 


4 




VH 


f * 


Of ^?ov°* 


C* 


E-Vi 


\ 


i». 




SPECIAL 
OFFER! 

Fans! Four pictures of "Ziegfeld 
Follies" Girls by Petty — in 
8"xl0" pin-up size and in full 
color — can be yours for only 
25F! Usecoupon below—and use 
it fast—for supply is limited! 




M-G-M, BOX 942, Grand Central Annex 
New York 17, N.Y. 

Please send me full-color pin-up pictures 1 
of the famous "Ziegfeld Follies” Girls by I 
Petty as advertised. 




I enclose 25< for all four. 

Nam* 

Addrett 
City.Zone 


*1 


.V 


starring 

FRED ASTAIRE 
LUCILLE BALL 
LUCILLE BREMER 
FANNY BRICE 
JUDY GARLAND 
KATHRYN GRAYSON 
LENA HORNE 
GENE KELLY 
JAMES MELTON 
VICTOR MOORE 
RED SKELTON 
ESTHER WILLIAMS 

and 

WILLIAM POWELL 

with 

EDWARD ARNOLD 
MARION BELL 
BUNIN’S PUPPETS 
CYD CHARISSE 
HUME CRONYN 
WILLIAM FRAWLEY 
ROBERT LEWIS 
VIRGINIA O’BRIEN 
KEENAN WYNN 
DIRECTED BY VINCENTE MINNELLI 
PRODUCED BY ARTHUR FREED 
A METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURE 


t 










Ms. 


i" ^ 




'hi 




Slat* 


//* 


IN 




















































Inside Hollywood 



The Paul Henreids vacationed at Palm 
Springs at finish of "Devotion" (W.B.). 




Kay Williams and her $ugar-heir hubby, 
Adolph Spreckles, at Santa Anita track. 


BIOG BRIEFS: 

The lovely young daughter of Gloria 
de Haven and John Payne has been named 
Kathleen. 

Mortimer Snerd and Charlie McCarthy are 
to have a new playmate when the Frances 
Westermann-Edgar Bergen youngster checks 
into Hollywood in April. 

The O'Connor clan will welcome a new 
member into an old vaudeville family when 
Gwen Carter and Don O'Connor trap the 
stork with summer. 

As you may have read in your local news¬ 
paper, Mary Astor recently married Thomas 
G. Wheelock, Chicago businessman. Miss 
Astor's maid of honor was her daughter, 
Marilyn Thorpe, who is growing up to be an 
authentic beauty. 

Anne Gwynne and Max Gilford, attorney, 
were married in a double-ring ceremony at 
Beverly Vista United Presbyterian church in 
Beverly Hills, with Dr. James R. Stewart 
reading the service. 

When David Niven stepped off the train, 
after having spent almost six years in the 
British army, he was met by Herbert Mar¬ 
shall, Reginald Gardiner, Mr. and Mrs. Nigel 
Bruce and Edmund Goulding. Promptly, 
they whisked him out to the Goldwyn lot, 
where his #5 dressing room had been held 
without occupant during Davie’s entire ab¬ 
sence. Upon his arrival, he was presented 
with a new canvas chair, the gift of the 
studio technicians with whom Mr. Niven has 
always been very popular. 

Lon McAllister is now out of khaki and 
is writing some fiction before returning to 
camera work for Sol Lesser in March. 

Lovely Lynn Merrick (real name: Marilyn 
Llewellyn of Dallas, Texas) is now the wife 
of Conrad Nagel. The ceremony was per¬ 
formed at Fort Lee, New Jersey, by Municipal 
Judge I. William Aronsohn. 



Claudette Colbert went to the premiere of "Tomorrow Is Forever," with Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Goetr (20th exec.) and Frank Ross (Jean Arthur's husband). Claudette stars in the pic. 


By FREDDA DUDLEY 


Marie McDonald (The Body) and Vic Or- 
satti (The Agent) have announced a friendly 
separation. 

Jinx Falkenburg has succeeded in terminat¬ 
ing her contract with Columbia, and she in¬ 
tends to retire from public life permanently 
in order to be mother to the forthcoming 
McCrary heir, and wife to Tex. 

Myrna Loy was one of the loveliest brides 
of any season when she wore a horizon 
blue suit, matching hat frilled with violet 
and blue veiling, and carried a bouquet of 
French violets, and marched up the aisle to 
say "I Do" to Commodore Gene Markey. 
Admiral William F. Halsey served as best 
man. Miss Loy was twenty minutes late in 
arriving at the Navy Chapel because her 
car was held up by congested traffic caused 
by an accident which, luckily, was too far 
away for the bride to see. Observed 
Admiral Halsey to the perspiring bridegroom 
just before the "perfect wife" arrived, "Don’t 
worry, she’ll be here." 

Kay Kyser and his go’jus Georgia Carroll 
will have a new vocalist in the nursery next 
summer. 

And Ginny Simms and her husband. Hyatt 
Dehn, have had the top of a mountain bull¬ 
dozed off—seven acres of level plot—and 
are building one of the first motion picture 
postwar houses on the site. Exotic feature 
is to be a glassed-in swimming pool from 
which all of Los Angeles will be visible in 
breath-taking panorama. So far, upon re¬ 
lease of this news, the Dehns have received 
only two applications from distressed house¬ 
holders who would like to moor houseboats 
on the pool and live there until other housing 
accommodations are available. 

CONVERSATIONAL SNATCHES: 

Betty Hutton and Ted Briskin are wonder¬ 
ing whether it will be Junior or Juniorette 
when it arrives next summer. 

Kim Hunter (whose legal maiden name 
was Janet Cole) and Captain William A. 
Baldwin, Marine Corps pilot, have just se¬ 
cured an interlocutory degree of divorce in 
Los Angeles Superior Court. Kim was 
awarded custody of her 13-months-old daugh¬ 
ter, Kathryn. 

The Ben Blues are planning a nursery Blue 
for September. 

Van Heflin and Frances Neal will welcome 
their second infant in June. 

REPEAT: 

One of the loveliest of brides was Esper- 
anza Baur, Mexican film actress, when she 
became John Wayne's wife. Her wedding 
outfit consisted of a soft blue suit with white 
blouse, a blue feathered hat with a looped 
blue veil, and blue pumps. Her gloves were 
white as were the three huge orchids she 
wore as a shoulder corsage. Interesting fact 
is this: Miss Baur was previously married to 
Mr. Eugene Morrison of Mexico City, so was 
Mrs. Morrison by right of her first wedding. 
Her second again makes her a Mrs. Morrison, 
as John's name is really Marion Michael 
Morrison. 








GET OUT FROM BEHIND THAT 
BRUSH, BOYS...WE KNOW YA! 


Lsrnour 


They haven’t got a cough drop to their 
name . . . but they’re loaded with 
riotous entertainment in the latest and 
greatest "Road" Show of them all. 


-trsVs 


S/t/StfH THAM 
•SIN&A PO«L£' 


Z*WifJP THAN 
‘ZANZIBAR.’ 


Bing sings ’em! Dottie sings ’em ! Pretty soon 
everybody'll be singing ’em! “Personality 
"Put It There, Pal" • "Welcome To My Dream" 
end many more. 


MORE socro 
THAN 'MOROCCO' 













Inside Hollywood continued 



JENNIFER 

JONES 

is one of the stars of 



Made by 

SELZNICK,, TECHNICOLOR 


MERCURIAL MATRIMONY: 

In the picture "The Dark Corner," starring 
Lucille Ball and William Bendix, Kathy Downs 
enacts the role of Clifton Webb's wife. (Those 
of you who saw "Laura" will recall Mr. 
Webb's suave and urbane manner.) Kathy 
had never met Mr. Webb until they were in¬ 
troduced at a party. Said the hostess, 
"Kathy, this is Mr. Webb." 

Said Mr. Webb, "Hello, Wife, how have 
you been?" During the rest of the evening, 
he introduced Kathy as his wife, a fact that 
may explain the hysteria of some columnists 
who didn't penetrate the mild hoax. 

NOT SO "SILENT NIGHT": 

During the holidays. Miss Margaret O'Brien 
approached an antique piano on the set of 
"Three Wise Fools" and—-whenever she was 
free of the camera for a few moments— 
painstakingly began to one-finger the melody 
of "Silent Night." 

The first day this antic was amusing, the 
second day it became trying, and the third 
had half the members of the cast ready to 
fly into flame. Not wishing to hurt Mar¬ 
garet's feelings, one of the workmen taped 
the piano shut, then explained to Margaret 
that the instrument was very rare and that 
he had been ordered to restrain anyone from 
playing it. 

"What a shame," sighed Miss O'Brien. 
"Tomorrow I'll bring my xylophone and play 
'Silent Night' for everyone." 

WIDE OPEN SPACES: 

So you'd like to be a picture star? You 
think life could be so simple and luxurious? 
Before you lapse into magenta dreams about 
the life of the lucky, consult Dane Clark. 
In the worst housing shortage in one hun¬ 
dred years, Dane and his wife found them¬ 
selves evicted from their lodgings (the build¬ 
ing had been sold) just before Christmas. 
It's true that they owned a cabin which had 
existed on the property they had bought in 
the Pacific Palisades section, but it was not a 
spot in which to spend a California winter. 
Yet, after the usual thirty days of frantic 
search, Dane had to give up; he and his wife 
moved into their shanty. Pay heed; this edifice 
consisted of two rooms, neither of which 
boasted a door. There was no glass in any 


of the windows. There was no running 
water—until it rained, and then it was 
plentiful inside AND out. And there was 
no heat. The lane leading from the main 
highway up to the house had never even 
been sanded, so as soon as the weather 
began to collect in the ruts, this thorough¬ 
fare became a quagmire. It would have 
been foolhardy to try to coax a car up or 
down the lane, so Dane parked his car just 
off the highway and walked. 

In order to defy the breeze somewhat, he 
boarded up the doors. Eventually a glazier 
fixed the windows. But at Christmas time 
there was still no heat, no means of cook¬ 
ing food, no restaurant within fifteen miles, 
and only primitive plumbing facilities. 

Both Dane and his wife came down with 
heavy colds. 

So don't come to California. There is 
no place to live, and if you don't believe it, 
ask Dane. Then run like crazy. 

GROUNDS FOR MARRIAGE: 

Katherine DeMille telephoned her husband, 
Tony Quinn, on the set of Paramount's "The 
Imperfect Lady," to announce disconsolately 
that the vacant lot just west of their house 
had been put up for sale and that a troop of 
those avid to acquire real estate were ex¬ 
amining the property. "If someone builds a 
two-story house on the grounds," she grieved, 
"it will cut off our view of the ocean. It just 
makes me heartsick." 

Tony condoled with her. said perhaps the 
asking price would be too great, or that the 
purchaser would build a low, rambling house. 
The following day, without discussing the 
problem further with his wife, Tony did some 
investigating. So, on the morning of her 
eighth wedding anniversary, to Katherine's 
astonished delight, she found the deed to the 
vacant lot resting on her breakfast plate. 

TOPICS OF GOSSIP: 

Eva Brigitta Balanchine, whom you know 
as Vera Zorina the ballerina, was recently 
awarded a Nevada decree of divorce from 
George Balanchine, famed chereographer. 

Two recent marriages are both rumored to 
be pfft. Sheila Ryan and Allan Lane, mar¬ 
ried in Las Vegas in October, are separated. 

(Continued on page 10) 



Navy nuptials: Admiral Bill Halsey, Jr. carried the ring for Commodore Gene Markey, 
when he married Myrna Loy in San Pedro, Calif. Mrs. Collier Young was matron of honor' 








George Raft ... in trouble 
up to his gun-hilt . . . 
with Ava Gardner's 
beauty only stirring 
k up more ... in the 
picture that proves 
it takes a woman 
to make a good 
guy out of an 
'% all-wrong 


* 





GREGORY 

PECK 

is one of the stars of 

Dm 

Son 

SELZNICK,^TECHNICOLOR 


Inside Hollywood von tin u *>it 



Mocambo duet: Popular date Diana Lynn 
dancing with movie executive, Henry Willson. 

Also local conversation insists that Lois 
Andrew and David Street have curdled. 

Speaking of the fascination of names (natal, 
acquired, or abandoned) did you know that 
Sabu is really Mr. Dastagir? That Rory Cal¬ 
houn was christened Francis Timothy 
McCown? That Maria Montez will anwer if 
you call, after taking a deep breath, for 
Maria Africa Gracia Vidal de Santo Silas 
Aumont? That Guy Madison is known in 
Bakersfield, California, as Bob Mosely? That 
Catherine Craig is really Kay Feltus Mes- 
ervey? And that Catherine McLeod stuck 
to her own name despite the combined efforts 
of Metro and Universal? 

A Bob Crosby quote, useful in future argu¬ 
ments about classical versus jamboree music: 
"A two beat band, or strictly Dixieland, is 
nothing more than an angry instrumental 
feud." 

NOTHING BUT THE TOOTH: 

At a recent party. John Emery was telling 
this goodie about the days when he was 
married to the fabulous Tallulah Bankhead. 
After a play performance one night, it seems 
that Talloo and John entered the taproom of 
the hotel in which they were staying and 
ordered a midnight supper. During the 
course of the repast, an over-stimulated citi¬ 
zen decided to have a long, rather profane 
talk with Miss Bankhead. John, a big man 
perfectly capable of defending himself and 
all members of his family, arose and gently 
escorted the drunk back to the bar. A few 
moments later, the swizzled gentleman re¬ 
turned and was once again ushered from the 
immediate vicinity. Miss Bankhead said, 
"I've finished my dinner anyway, so let's go." 

As Mr. Emery was paying the check, his 
two-time losing friend reappeared, having 
grown more abusive with the progress of 
the evening. For a third time, John set the 
little man aside, and hurried to the elevator. 
When John joined his wife upstairs, Tallulah 
asked, "How did the fight turn out? What 
did you do?" 

"Nothing," said John easily, sinking into a 
chair. "I just lifted him out of my way." 

Announced his wife in her best J. Louis 
tones, "Why didn't you hit the so-and-so like 
this . . ." and kiddingly she whirled a straight 
right to Mr. Emery's mouth. It was a gag. 


but it landed before Mr. Emery could feint, 
and it packed enough wallop to knock out 
a conspicuous tooth and to lacerate his lip. 
In the middle of the night there was great to- 
do, getting a dentist to effect repairs, and 
securing a doctor to take a stitch in the lip. 

To this day. Miss Bankhead never sees Mr. 
Emery (from whom she is now divorced, but 
not on the grounds of assault and battery) 
without exclaiming, "Oh, John, how nice to 
see you. And how is your poor tooth?" 

CUPIDATE: 

By the time you read this the chances are 
excellent that Olivia de Havilland will be 
Mrs. Joseph McKeon, wife of Major Joseph 
McKeon. This romance is one of far longer 
standing than most Hollywood people know. 
When Joe was a Captain in England, acting 
as operations officer for the 77th Fighter 
Group, his plane was named Olivia D. On 
one occasion, some wag in the 77th secured 
a picture made at the Hollywood Canteen of 
Olivia and Captain McKeon (he had served 
in the South Pacific before being transferred 
to the ETO) posted this picture on the Group 
bulletin board with a directive for all pilots 
to sign off. They did. 

EMILY NOT-SO-WELL POSTED: 

Hollywood manners are, sadly enough, the 
source of constant surprise to Easterners. 
Local etiquette is modified by a hundred 
problems, chief of which is the vast number 
of visiting dignitaries for whom the red 
carpet and the dazzling dinner companion 
must be provided. 

On the occasion of Myrna Loy's marriage 
to Commander Gene Markey, at which cere¬ 
mony Admiral Halsey was best man, it seems 
that an additional admiral suddenly put in 
appearance. Commander Markey called 
friends at 20th Century-Fox and asked if he 
might borrow the charming presence of a 
starlet, whereupon Faye Marlowe was sug¬ 
gested. So she went to the wedding of two 
persons whom she had never previously 
met, danced throughout the reception with an 
admiral whom she may never see again, and 
was driven home afterward by the bride and 
groom. 

(Continued on page 99) 



Eleanor Parker admits secret wedding to 
liquor exec. Bert Friedlob in Las Vegas. 









Proudest 

af 1 am f r , 

Righto e 


.SSS*®*** 

■ starring rjVOR** with 

PH SCOTT and AN fLEMlN G 

“SSf.*--”- 1 " 

" sort® .J*P 


from the best-selling 
novel "Trail Town," by 
Ernest Haycox, author 
of "Stogecooch." 




n 









HONEYMOON 






CAN BE YOURS 
TONIGHT 

You —at your peak of 
charm. You in his 
arms! You with petal-soft 
skin—so excitingly fragrant— 
a vision of loveliness to win 
romance ... and hold it. 




Tonight—every night- 


revel in a sea of billowing, 
fragrant foam that floats fatigue 
away as it caresses your skin. Step 
forth aglow—alive—with the fresh¬ 
ness 1 of a dew-drenched flower. 

Five floral scents (25 luxurious 
baths) in every package. 


> 



ROBERT H. CLARK COMPANY 
Beverly Hills * California 



So Proudly We Hail 


This is the sixth in a series of special features dedi¬ 
cated to Hollywood's war veterans and men still in service 
—keeping up with the stars who’ve been away, and report¬ 
ing on the many who might have been stars by now if their 
careers hadn’t been interrupted. 


Remember GEORGE MONTGOMERY’S last picture, “Coney 
Island,” with Betty Grable? That was in 1943. Since then, 
he’s been known as Corporal Montgomery of the Army Air 
Corps. 

A special assignment to Alaska ended in near tragedy for 
George, when he was shipwrecked off the coast. But now? 
He’s back in the 20th Century-Fox fold and working with 

June Haver and Vivian Blaine in “Three Little Girls in Blue.” 

* * * 

RICHARD TRAVIS’ mission is completed and he’s ready 
to take up his Hollywood career again—on a free lance basis, 
or signed to a term contract; he hasn’t yet decided which 
way it will be. (Before the war you saw him opposite Bette 
Davis in “The Man Who Came to Dinner,” and with Eleanor 
Parker in “Mission to Moscow.”) 

Dick has been serving in the Air Forces and for a time 

appeared in the “Winged Victory” stage show. 

* * * 

RAY MacDONALD has resumed his screen career, after a 
too-long absence, and is now working with June Allyson in 
“Till the Clouds Roll By.” Before he entered the Army as 
a Private in 1942, you saw Ray in such pictures as “Life 
Begins for Andy Hardy” and “Presenting Lily Mars.” 

In the service, things happened fast. He was transferred 
to the Air Corps, became a Corporal, joined the “Winged 
Victory” company, and married a girl in the cast. Ray was 
also in the motion picture version of the stage production. 
After appearing with the show in Italy, he returned to the 
U. S. and was honorably discharged. (Continued on page 98) 




Old friends: Doug Fairbanks Jr. and 
Mary Pickford at an RKO parfy. 


Mr. and Mrs. Ty Power step out with director 
Anatole Litvak before leaving for a N. Y. trip. 


*c 

George Montgomery returns in 
"Three Little Girls In Blue." 


12 














WARNERS! 


EDNA FERBER’S STORY OF STORIES FROM 


FlORA HOBSON - HAL R WALLIS 


PRODUCTION • DIRECTED BY 


5AM WOOD 


Screen Play by Casey Robinson 
From the Novel by Edna Ferbei 
Music by Man Stemei 


13 























































JOSEPH 

COTTEN 

is one of the stars of 

Dm 

t Sun 

M a d e by 

SELZNICK m TECHNICOLOR 


Oragonwyck (20th) 

A nice, chilly job about landowner 
and tenant feudin’ on the Hudson 
in 1844. Chock full of suspense. 
With Gene Tierney, Vincent Price, 
Walter Huston, Spring Byington, 
Vivienne Osborne and newcomer 
Glenn Langan. The screen play is 
from the Anya Seton novel of the 
same name. 

Devotion (W. B.) 

A dramatization of the writing 
careers of the sisters Bronte—Char¬ 
lotte, Emily and Anne—with a 
background of places and person¬ 
ages of the times (1836). An 
auspicious cast includes Olivia De- 
Havilland, Ida Lupino, Nancy 
Coleman, Paul Henreid, Sidney 
Greenstreet, Dame May Whitty and 
an interesting and notably capable 
actor, Arthur Kennedy, doing the 
role of the unhappy Bronte brother, 
Bramwell. 

Young Widow (United Artists) 

Jane Russell, of “Outlaw” fame, 
makes her second appearance on 
the screen in the role of a war 
widow who clings to the memory of 
her husband and refuses to forget 
the past. Louis Hayward pursues 
the lovely lady, and Marie Wilson, 
Kent Taylor and Penny Singleton 
contribute competent support. 

Front This Day Forward (RKO) 

Based on the novel, “All Brides Are 
Beautiful,” by Thomas Bell, this is. 
a romantic, gay story of a young 
married couple, in love with life 
and each other. Joan Fontaine is 
the beautiful bride and newcomer 
Mark Stevens shows great promise 
in his first big role. Henry Morgan, 
Arline Judge and Rosemary De- 
Camp are all related to the bride. 

Just Before Dawn (Columbia) 

Crime doctor Warner Baxter ex¬ 
poses the plastic surgery racket in 
a series of face-saving episodes. 
Mona Barrie and Adelle Roberts are 
among those who don’t get away 
with their skins! 

The Spider Woman Strikes Back (Uni¬ 
versal) 

Gale Sondergaard turns cattle- 
poisoner in this gruesome mystery. 
Kirby Grant and Brenda Joyce pro¬ 
vide the romantic background—and 
welcome it is! 


Bad Bascomb (M-G-M) 

Introduces the new screen team of 
Wallace Beery and screen moppet, 
Margaret O’Brien. It’s a tale of 
Utah-bound Mormons who harbor 
a group of tough bank robbers— 
without knowing it. Cast includes 
Marjorie Main, Russell Simpson, 
Frances Rafferty and Marshall 
Thompson. 

Sentimental Journey (20th) 

A tender tale of a little girl’s ef¬ 
forts to look after the husband of 
a departed friend via messages re¬ 
ceived from the Great Beyond. 
Little Connie Marshall does a heavy 
acting chore, with John Payne, 
Maureen O’Hara, William Bendix, 
Kurt Kreuger and others taking 
up the slack. 

Romance of the West (PRC) 

Cowboy and Indian-stuff. Rene¬ 
gades try to cheat redskin land- 
owners but don’t make the grade 
after singing cowboy, Emmett Lynn, 
steps in. Forrest Taylor, Robert 
McKenzie and Chief Thundercloud 
are cast in this one. Pretty Joan 
Barton adds a feminine touch. 

Murder in the Music Hall (Rep.) 

Murder against a background of 
flashing silver skates and gracefully 
executed ice ballets. Vera Hruba 
Ralston gets the spotlight, both as 
ice performer and nice suspect. 
William Marshall, Helen Walker, 
Ann Rutherford and William Gar- 
gan are part of the icecapade. 

Song of Arizona (Rep.) 

Roy Rogers and Trigger save the 
old homestead for Gabby Hayes and 
Dale Evans, in spite of shenanigans 
from Lyle Talbot, Johnny Calkins 
and other shady characters. 

Adventure (M-G-M) 

Clark Gable’s back, after three 
years, to renew his attacks on femi¬ 
nine heartstrings. It’s the story of 
a hard-bitten, sea-loving merchant 
mariner (Clark Gable) who marries 
a home-loving San Francisco libra¬ 
rian (Greer Garson). Joan Blondell 
is vivacious and sprightly as Greer 
Garson’s roommate;Thomas Mitchell 
is the sailor who lost his soul, and 
Gable is, after all—Gable! 

(Continued on page 92) 


Greer Garson, voted most popular actress 
of '45, with Clark Gable in “Adventure." 






HER EYES PROWII' 
HER UPS SNEER 


Savage priestess of the Leopard Men 
. . . sworn to bring back Tarzan’s body 
for her fiendish jungle ritual! 


L .. 


R K O 
RADIO 


Original Story and Screen Play by CARROLL YOUNG —Based Upon the Characters Created by EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS 


15 











Whenever you buy tampons, remem¬ 
ber that FIBS give you two features 
that are extremely important: 



Rounded Ends. 

Yes, FIBS have 
smooth, gently ta¬ 
pered ends that are 
bound to make in¬ 
sertion easy — as 
you can see at a 
glance. And your first experience with 
FIBS proves it’s true! 

Quilting. FIBS are ''quilted” to keep 
them from fluffing up to an uncom¬ 
fortable size, which might cause pres¬ 
sure, irritation, difficult removal. 


This quilting also prevents cotton 
particles from clinging to delicate in¬ 
ternal membranes—a feature fastidious 
women always appreciate! 


Next time you buy tampons 
be sure to ask for FIBS *1 


»T. M . Res. C. S. P«t. Off. 



Five years ago, Carole Lombard and Clark 
Gable were +he most-in-love duo in town. 


ONE YEAR AGO: Bette Davis made 
“The Corn is Green” another personal 
triumph . '. . Fred MacMurray and 
“Murder, He Says” were the zaniest 
twosome of the month . . . Shirley 
Temple, announcing her engagement 
to Sgt. John Agar, said the wedding 
would not take place for at least two 
years . . . Ann Blyth, hateful daugh¬ 
ter of “Mildred Pierce,” was seriously 
injured in a toboggan accident . . . 
Humphrey Bogart gifted Lauren Ba¬ 
call with two cocker spaniels . . . 
Joyce MacKenzie, formerly a ship¬ 
yard carpenters’ helper, was given a 
choice role in “Tomorrow is Forever,” 
Claudette Colbert-Orson Welles star¬ 
ring epic . . . Welles and wife Rita 
Hayworth happily cooing in local 
nightclubs . . . R.K.O. grooming Bette- 
jane Greer, Rudy Vallee’s ex-wife, for 
important screen roles . . . Robert 
Benchley stagging it at local night- 
eries . . . Bob Walker still mad for 
Diana Lynn . . . Tallulah Bankhead 
delighting filmgoers by being mixed- 
up in “A Royal Scandal” . . . 
Dead-ender Huntz Hall was rushing 
songbird Margaret Whiting . . . Jinx 
Falkenburg rating cheers for her will¬ 
ingness to go anywhere at anytime to 
entertain servicemen . . . John Payne 
and Gloria DeHaven the most devoted 
young-marrieds in town . . . Sylvia 
Sidney successfully returned to the 
screen in “Blood on the Sun” . . . 
June Allyson seeing life through Dick 
Powell’s eyes. 

FIVE YEARS AGO: Boris Karloff 
was a smash hit in the spine-chilling 
stage production of “Arsenic and Old 
Lace” . . . Glamour-queen Lana 
Turner dating Tony Martin . . . June 
Duprez and Randy Scott a devoted 
twosome . . . Howard Hughes was 
hoping for another Tyrone Power in 


Jack Buetel, star of his “The Outlaw” 
. . . Bette Davis became the bride of 
New Englander Arthur Farnsworth 
. . . Glenn Ford was being hailed as 
a “find” . . . Orson Welles squiring 
Dolores Del Rio about town, and the 
romance looked serious . . . Hope, 
Crosby, and Lamour started off on 
their hilarious road trips with “The 
Road to Zanzibar” . . . Carole Lom¬ 
bard and Clark Gable were easily the 
most-in-love couple in town . . . 
Mickey Rooney was going strong with 
the “Andy Hardy” series . . . Linda 
Darnell, much sought after in the 
romance department, was playing the 
field ... It was predicted that Dorothy 
Comingore would be a Hollywood 
sensation after “Citizen Kane.” 

TEN YEARS AGO: George Brent, 
one of the film colony’s earliest air 
enthusiasts, put his plane up for sale. 
Crashes of friends became too numer¬ 
ous . . . Norma Shearer was chosen 
the best-coiffured woman on the 
screen . . . Hollywood betting that 
Bruce Cabot and Adrienne Ames 
would reconcile . . . “Show Boat,” 
starring Irene Dunne and Allan Jones, 
was the outstanding picture of the 
month . . . Joan Bennett made a trip 
to Europe with husband Gene Markey 
. . . Rosalind Russell played a minor 
role in the Ronald Colman-Claudette 
Colbert picture “Under Two Flags” 
. . . Universal announced it was going 
to build Cesar Romero to stardom . . . 
Warner Bros, planning to make a star 
of their contract player June Travis 
. . . 20th Century-Fox had similar 
plans for June Lang . . . Madeleine 
Carroll was one of . the most popular 
players on the screen . . . Leslie How¬ 
ard was giving the greatest perform¬ 
ance of his career as Romeo opposite 
Norma Shearer’s Juliet. 




















&j&riecli<}£ 

SBcaeauA. 


presents 




PAULETTE 

GODDARD 


also starring 


BURGESS 


HURD 


OWEN 


MEREDITH • HATFIELD 

FRANCIS 

LEDERER 

will. JUDITH ANDERSON • FLORENCE BATES • IRENE RYAN m 

REGINALD 


Produced by BENEDICT BOGEAUS and BURGESS MEREDITH 
Directed by JEAN RENOIR • Adapted from the novel by Octave Mirbeau 
And the play by Andre Heuse, Andre De Lorde and Thielly Nores 
Screenplay by Burgess Meredith • RELEASED THRU UNITED ARTISTS 




17 





SALLE ANN, Dept. 475 

1409 Washington Ave., St. Louis 3, Mo. 

Enclosed find $.or send C.O.D. . . . "Button 

Beauty" dress; $5 each plus 10c postaae. Ring vour 
size: 9, 11, 13, 15. 

Check first and second color choice: 

□ Shocking pink □ Lime green 

□ Powder blue 

NAME_ 

ADDRESS_ 

CITY-STATE- 

WE MAIL C.O.D. IF YOU WISH, However to save 
C. O. D. charges and speed delivery, send money 
order or cashier’s check with order. Add 1 Oc for moil- 
ing, handling, insurance. (In Missouri add 2% for 
state sales tax). 


MONEY BACK if not completely satisfied 


Dir. Fritz Long (above) writes to MOVIELAND. 

Dear Miss Cline: 

I have just had the pleasure of 
reading the very fine article Miss 
Gertrude Shanklin wrote about me in 
the December issue of Movieland 
magazine, and I want to thank you. 
It is an excellent piece of reporting. 

There was only one paragraph in 
the article which I felt might cause 
some readers of Movieland to be con¬ 
fused. Perhaps I am wrong. It is 
paragraph three on page 71. It reads: 

“Then came 1933, and Hitler. One 
year was all Lang could take of 
Nazism, and vice versa. He left for 
Paris, just one jump ahead of the 
Gestapo.” 

It is not true that I tolerated Nazism 
for one year. I fought them from the 
very beginning on with the weapon 
I had—motion pictures. While the 
Nazis were gaining power during the 
end of 1932 and January, 1933, I made 
a film entitled ‘Das Testament Des 
Dr. Mabuse” (The Last Will of Dr. 
Mabuse), a story of a mad scientist 
in a German asylum. 

Into the mouth of the mad master- 
criminal, I placed the slogans of Nazi 
philosophy, and while the film was 
being cut in February and March, 
1933, Hitler came into power, and I 
received a call from Herr Goebbels, 
head of the Ministry of Propaganda, 
and consequently in charge of films, 
who asked me to become head of the 
German film industry. 

That same night I fled for Paris be¬ 
cause fortunately I had a passport 
with a French entrance visa. I was 
not able to take with me more of my 
belongings than could be put into 
two valises. Of course, the Nazis 
suppressed “Das Testament des Dr. 
Mabuse,” and confiscated my bank ac¬ 
counts, my house, and every posses¬ 
sion I had left behind. 

I am sure you will appreciate my 
feelings in this instance; my feelings 
which perhaps are unduly acute and 






to the 


EDITOR 


BY CLARE CURTIS 

Crisp Vat-Dyed Pique 
Splattered with Snowy Buttons 

What a wonderful way to welcome summer ! But¬ 
tons march from cardigan neck to waist-whittling, 
set-in belt.. .close the side-placket... dance on the 
cunning pockets and flattering yoke! And aren't the 
colors stunning! Shocking pink, powder blue, lime 
green striped in black. Sizes 9 to 15. 

Salle Ann Shops, 1409 Washington, St. Louis 3, Me. 

38 Shops In Tens, Louisiana, Missouri and Illinois 


which, perhaps, make me read more 
into the paragraph than is suggested 
by the words themselves. 

If you agree, I wonder if you would 
find a place—even the smallest one— 
and tell your readers that I did not 
tolerate Nazism for even one year. 

Again, thank you. 

Sincerely yours, 

Fritz Lang 
Universal City, Calif. 

We are happy to reprint Mr. Lang’s 
letter in its entirety, because we believe 
his point is well taken. 

Dear Miss Cline: 

Thanks, thanks, thanks for that 
lovely color portrait of Janis Paige 
in your January issue of Movieland. 

I always get your magazine the first 
day it’s out, for the next day there 
aren't any left. I like it because 
you’re always first with news about 
the latest stars in Hollywood. 

Thanks again, 

Jean McPherson 
Lincoln, Nebraska 

If you're keeping up with Janis Paige, 
you’ll be glad to know she’s in “‘Two 
Guys From Milwaukee,” with Dennis 
Morgan and Jack Carson. 

Dear Miss Cline: 

I am one of your very, very many 
readers of Movieland. I think it’s a 
- very good magazine and you always 
have such nice pictures of the stars. 
Could you please have some pictures 
of Ross Hunter? 

A Reader, 

Jean Ailley 
Alberta, Canada 

We’ve a story of Ross Hunter coming 
up soon. 

Dear Miss Cline: 

Thanks for that wonderful story 
and beautiful pictures of Joan Craw¬ 
ford. I’ve noticed all the time Joan’s 
been off the screen you’ve tried to 
keep her name before the public and 
that’s a fine thing to do. 

Sincerely, 

Don Tonkin 
Detroit, Mich. 

Here’s a picture of Joan getting the 
“Golden Apple” award from the Holly¬ 
wood Women’s Press Club for being the 
most cooperative actress in 1945. Greg¬ 
ory Peck is doing the pin-up job and 
Kay Proctor, Pres, of the club and writer 
for MOVIELAND, looks on approvingly. 





























Dear Sirs: 

In the February issue of your maga¬ 
zine, I read a most interesting article 
by Alice L. Tildesley called “Sandra 
Predicts.” Usually my parents refuse 
to pay any attention to any movie 
magazine I read, but this article in¬ 
terested them so, they picked up your 
magazine for the first, but I am sure 
not the last time. 

Yours truly, 

Dolores C. Gibbs 
Bronx, N. Y. 

W e’re happy to welcome rour folks 
to MOVIELAND. 

Dear Editor: 

Enjoy your magazine so much but 
have been disappointed not to see a 
story about Johnny Coy, that wonder¬ 
ful dancer. Won’t you please oblige 
me? Thanks. 

Sincerely, 

Irma Treadwell 
Bangor, Maine 

Look for a story on Johnny Coy in a 
near-future issue of MOVIELAND. He’s 
at work now in “Ladies’ Man’’ at Para¬ 
mount. 



Don Taylor of "Winged Victory" fame. 


Gentlemen: 

In reading your article “So Proudly 
We Hail,” on page 6 of the January 
issue of Movieland, you show a pic¬ 
ture of Don Dexter (nee Don Taylor) 
and you also have something written 
about him. 

It just happens that I became ac¬ 
quainted with Don Taylor while he 
was in New York with the “Winged 
Victory” show and the picture that 
you have in your magazine is not of 
Don Taylor. 

Are you sure you have the right 
fellow? 

Very truly yours, 

Ruth Cooper 
Bronx, New York 

MOVIELAND stands half corrected! We 
thought there was only one Don Taylor, 
but find there are two, Donald Dexter 
Taylor, whose picture we ran, really has 
all those medals. He’s 27 years old 
and went to Hollywood in 1941 to play 
in Westerns. The “Winged Victory” 
credit goes to the Don Taylor whose 
picture we reprint herewith, with apolo¬ 
gies to him and his many fans who 
wrote in. 


Something new has happened to deodorants . . . 
a super-fast cream deodorant that stops perspiration troubles 
faster than you can powder your nose. 

Try new ODORONO Cream Deodorant today —works better 
because it contains science’s most effective perspiration stopper 

Affords many other greatly needed blessings too—really 
protects up to 3 days. Will not irritate your skin or 
harm fine fabrics ... or turn gritty in the jar. 

It’s excitingly different. It’s the wonderful, new super-fast 
ODORONO Cream Deodorant. 



Stops 

Perspira* lon Troubles 
/faster 

THAN YOU CAN POWDER YOUR NOSE 


NEW, Superfust 



ODO’RO’DO 

CREAM DEODORANT ■ — 

39 * Alio 59<“ and I0< Plui Federal Tax 


ODORONO ICE is back from the wars...39^ 


19 













LIONEL 

BARRYMORE 

is one of the stars of 

Dm 

Son 

SELZNICK TECHNICOLOR 



AT RKO: 

TILL THE END OF TIME is being 
made from the book “They Dream of 
Home” and deals with the parallel 
emotional adjustments of a returned 
service man and a war widow. Dor¬ 
othy McGuire (wait until you see her 
in “The Spiral Staircase”—eeek!), 
Guy Madison, Bob Mitchum, Bill 
Williams, William Gargan, Jean Port¬ 
er, Harry von Zell, Ruth Nelson, Tom 
Tully, and Dickie Tyler. 

* * * 

WITHOUT RESERVATIONS might 
be RKO’s answer to “Week-end at 
The Waldorf,” but it isn’t. The lack of 
reservations applies to the railroad 
state of Claudette Colbert, who gets 
put off the train at La Junta, Color¬ 
ado. Deeply interested in this state 
of affairs is her co-star, John Wayne, 
and other characters are Don DeFore, 
Anne Triola, Ruth Roman, Henry 
Johnson and Dick Dickerson. 

NOTORIOUS has Cary Grant run 
ragged as an American agent, hot on 
the trail of Nazi operatives in Brazil. 
The day your reporter was on the set, 
Cary spent eight hours slowly bring¬ 
ing Ingrid Bergman (wearing a gor¬ 
geous burgundy velvet dressing 
gown) down a flight of stairs. Pre¬ 
sumably, in her role as counter¬ 
espionage operator, she had been poi¬ 
soned. Since this is a Hitchcock pic¬ 
ture, you may imagine the suspense. 
Also working in the picture are 
Claude Rains, Leopoldine Konstantin, 
Louis Calhern, Lenore Ulric, and 
Alexis Minotis. 

SISTER KENNY is the story of the 
remarkable Australian woman who 
has been taken to America’s heart. 
Rosalind Russell is enacting the part 
of the nurse; Dean Jagger and Alex¬ 
ander Knox are the two men in her 
life. George Barnes can be counted 
on to photograph the picture to great 
advantage. 

STEP BY STEP is another spy 
thriller involving Lawrence Tierney 
as a discharged marine and Anne 
Jeffreys as the secretary of a sena¬ 
tor; these two set out to locate a list 
of Nazi agents. Also cast are Lowell 
Gilmore, Myrna Dell, and Jason Ro- 
bards. 

CRACKUP finds Pat O’Brien cast 
as an art expert at the fictitious 
Museum of Contemporary Art. Claire 
Trevor is an art critic. About the time 
Pat gives a lecture on the use of X- 
ray to detect artistic fraud, all perdi¬ 
tion breaks loose. It seems that art 
masterpieces are disappearing, and it 
occurs to Pat and Claire to learn why. 
Now are you curious? The mystery 
will be solved with the aid of Herbert 
Marshall and Wally Ford (who was 
so funny as the would-be masher in 
“Spellbound”). 

* * * 

AT REPUBLIC: 

IN OLD SACRAMENTO shows that 
fine city as it appeared in 1853. 
Swashbuckling in the period cos¬ 
tumes, despite the three tons of mud 
hauled into the studio for the pur¬ 
poses of re-creating the boggy streets 


of the era, are Constance Moore, 
William Elliot, Eugene Pallette, Ruth 
Donnelly, Lionel Stander, and Ethel 
Wales. 

LONELY HEARTS CLUB is the 
first picture Jane Withers has made in 
a long, long time. She arrived on the 
set, fittingly enough, wearing a brace¬ 
let from which dangled a silver heart 
—the gift of John Dali whom you 
saw in “The Corn Is Green.” Work¬ 
ing in LONELY HEARTS CLUB, in 
addition to Jane, are James Lydon, 
Grant Withers, Raymond Walburn, 
Donald Meek, Johnny Sands, William 
Haade, Charles Quigley, and Donia 
Bussey. 

PASSKEY TO DANGER is in its 
first week as a whodunit with Steph¬ 
anie Bachelor, Kane Richmond (who 
should be a big star), Gerald Mohr, 
and lissome, blonde Adela Mara. 

* * * 

AT 20TH CENTURY-FOX: 

THREE LITTLE GIRLS IN BLUE, 
in Technicolor, is a picture with a 
varied history. Originally, Cesar 
Romero and Victor Mature were cast 
in it as soon as they were released 
from service. Then the casting de¬ 
partment looked over the script and 
changed its mind. Quick-fast, Butch 
and Vic were out, and George Mont¬ 
gomery and Frank Latimore were in. 
The three little girls are June Haver, 
Vivian Blaine and Vera-Ellen; also 
cast are the gentlemen named above, 
and Celeste Holm. Entire cast and 
script subject to change without no¬ 
tice. 

THE SHOCKING MISS PILGRIM, 
also in Technicolor, is the Betty 
Grable-Dick Haymes starrer in which 
they invent the typewriter, for 
(Continued on page 93) 



Carole Landis, as the luscious Loretta, in 
"A Scandal in Paris," with George Sanders. 


20 



Are you in the know? 





This sleeping beauty's off the beam, because — 

□ She's a curfew keeper 

□ She should be prom-trotting 

□ She's still wearing makeup 

Sleep and beauty go together—but don’t 
dream of wearing makeup to bed! It coars¬ 
ens your skin—makes mud-pies of your 
complexion. It invites unsightly "blossoms." 
So, refresh your face thoroughly at bedtime. 
Cleanliness and daintiness go together, too. 
And they’re never more important than at 
"certain" times. ..that’s why Kotex contains 
a deodorant. Yes, locked inside each Kotex 
napkin, the deodorant can’t shake out. See 
how this new Kotex "extra" can keep you 
sweet-and-lovely 1 



In calling for an appointment, how should 
she give her name? 

□ Miss Dinah Mite 

□ Miss Mite 

How’s your telephone technique? Whether 
you’re buzzing the dentist or beautician — 
when making any business appointment 
give your full name. Thus, the gal above 
should be Miss Dinah Mite. Which distin¬ 
guishes her from other Miss Mites; prevents 
needless puzzlement. And on "problem days” 
there’s no need for guesswork—as to which 
napkin really protects you. Kotex is the 
name to remember. For you get plus pro¬ 
tection from that exclusive safety center. 
Never a panicky moment with Kotex! 


Do you choose the colors of your clothes — ] 

□ To copy your gal pal 

□ To suit your color-type 

□ Because they're hi-fashion 

A color that’s Bacallish for one chick can be 
her gal pal’s poison! The trick is to find 
shades to suit your own color-type. Tuck 
materials of assorted hues under your chin. 
Whichever befriends your skin-tone and 
tresses—that’s for you! It’s a poise-booster. 
So too, (on "calendar” days) is Kotex—the 
napkin that befriends your smoothest date 
duds. Because Kotex has fat tapered ends 
that don’t show . . . don’t cause embar¬ 
rassing bulges. You can scoff at revealing 
outlines with those special flat pressed ends! 


Should a gal go down the aisle first? 

□ Yes 

□ No 

□ Not always 

Usually, the swish dish should be first to 
follow the usher. But a gal doesn’t always pre¬ 
cede her escort. When the usher is not at the 
door, her tall-dark-and-Vansome leads the way. 
Know what’s what. It keeps you confident. And 
to stay confident on "those” days, know r which 
napkin gives lasting comfort: Kotex, of course. 
Kotex is made to stay soft while wearing . . . 
doesn’t just "feel” soft at first touch...so you’re 
carefree because you’re more comfortable! 




More tvo/wen choose fCOTEX 

thaw a// other san/fairy nafih/hs 


21 
















m 

Your Hands 



Rough, raspy hands are as outdated 
as a 1912 gramaphone. Use SOFSKIN 
CREME to soften your skin and 
smooth away roughness. SOFSKIN 
is so good for your hands many 
beauticians prefer it. Make it part of 
your daily grooming schedule for 
hands, wrists, elbows and ankles, 
too. See how thrillingly soft and 
white your skin can be. 



In the Black and Gold jars— 
35** 60** $1.00 sizes* 

'Plus lax 

Ask for the free Sofskin 
demonstration at your beauty 
salon or cosmetic counter 


SOJSKIfl CR€I7K 




ACROSS 

1. Peggy Ann Garner in 
"Junior Miss” 

5. "Claire Mathews” in 
"Murder, He Says” 

10. "Arsenic and Old - - - 
(anag.) 

14. Butter substitute 

15. "The Man Who 

Walked.” 

16. Projecting part of Saturn’s 
rings 

17. "Bunny” in "Week-end at 
the Waldorf” (anag.) 

18. "Philip Lombard" in 
'And Then There Were 

None” 

19. Lillian - - - - 

20. Betty Field in "The 
Southerner” 

21. He’s in "Hold that 
Blonde” 

22. Lionel ------- 

24. Richard - - - - 

26. - - - - Janis 

27. Gloria Jean in "River 
Gang” 

30. Author of the movie: 
"Woman Proof” 

31. "First - - - - into Tokyo” 

35. They are in "The Fighting 

Lady” 

37. Rob’t Mitchum is one in 
"Story of G.I. Joe” (abbr.) 

39. Anagram for Mr. Baba 

40. Hebrew letter 

41. "It ain’t - - -” 

42. Exclamation of contempt 

43. Above (Poet.) 

44. Frances - - - (anag.) 

45. "Martinius” in "Our Vines 
Have Tender Grapes” 
(inits.) 

46. Author of "A Star 
Danced” 


48. He directed "And Then 
There Were None” 

50. "Joe Parker” in "Guest 
Wife” 

51. "The Woman in - - - - -” 
(anag.) 

52. "Murder, My -----” 

55. "- - - in Her Diary” 

56. "Love.” 

59. Mrs. Fredric March (inits.) 

60. "Deborah Brown” in 
"Uncle Harry” 

64. Feminine name 

65. "The Gay.ita” 

67. Pollute 

68. "Lucille Wiley” in "Sunset 
in El Dorado” 

69. Leon. 

70. With Susanna in "That 
Night With You” 

71. Claudette in "Guest Wife” 
(anag.) 

72. What Ronald did in 
"Kismet” 

73. One of "The Bull Fighters” 


DOWN 

1. "Mildred Pierce” 

2. Prefix denoting a forearm 
bone 

3. "Donald Martin” in "An¬ 
chors Aweigh” 

4. ------- and the Thief’ 

5. "Jack Williams” in 
"George White’s Scandals” 

6. "Love on the - - - -” 
(anag.) 

7. "Sebastian” in "The 
Naughty Nineties” 

8. Isolate 

9. Cozy retreats 

10. "Nick Condon” in "Blood 
on the Sun” 


11. - - - - Markey is in 
"Snafu” 

12. South African fox 

13. Bert 

23. Three-toed sloth 

25. "Bill Dietrich” in "The 
House on 92nd Street” 

26. "Archie” is - - - role in 
"Duffy’s Tavern” 

27. "Gangs of the ----- 
front’ T 

28. Baffle 

29. "Jim Perry” in "The Way 
Ahead" 

30. "Don Birnam” in "The 
Lost Week-end” (anag.) 

32. "You Came -----” 

33. Shirley is Robert’s. 

in "Kiss and Tell” 

34. She’s in "Jealousy” 

36. Row 

37. "- - - of the Saddle” 

38. ".Strangers” 

42. **- - - Americana” 

46. Movie studio and its ad¬ 
joining territory 

47. "Bishop” is - - - - role in 
56 across 

49. "Cynthia Glenn” in 
"Thrill of a Romance” 

50. "Escape in the -----” 

53. Editorial I 

54. Mormyroid fish of the Nile 

55. "Karin” in "This Love of 
Ours” 

56. "- - - - in the Dark” 

57. Kind of cheese 

58. - - - - Birell 

59. "The Singing - - - -” 

61. Spoils 

62. "Juanita” in "Week-end at 
the Waldorf” 

63. Anagram for Miss Horne 

66. Mr. Colman, familiarly 

(anag.) 


(For Solution See Page 68) 



22 


SOFSKIN COMPANY 


FINDLAY. OHIO 




































































































































No Long Hours Practicing 
Scales or Exercises . . . 
PLAY SONGS FIRST DAY 


»AVE MINOR’S SONG BOOK J' na & u ^ Cin lAu, 

Act now and get, in addition to — 

2for1 

OFFER 


Dave Minor’s famous Complete 
Home Course that teaches piano 
playing quickly without music, 
his wonderful new 72-page song 
book of 50 songs you quickly 
learn to play the Dave Minor 
Way. Mail the coupon below. 


You May Play Any Song in 10 Days 
Without Being Able to Read a Note! 

If you want to quickly learn how to play the piano ... if you want to 
play song hits, waltzes, marches, hymns, two steps, red hot numbers and 
western songs like “Don’t Fence Me In’* . . . here’s amazing news. Now 
at last Mr. Dave Minor has perfected a wonderfully easy play-by-ear 
piano course that must teach you piano playing in only 10 days or no 
cost. No scales, no long exercises. You start playing songs from the first 
lesson, and so soon it’s amazing ... you’re playing the piano surprisingly 
well. Mr. Minor’s sensationally successful home instruction course is 
complete. It contains all the pictures, all the instruction, everything you 
need. The complete course sent for your inspection, trial and approval. 


SEND NO MONEY 

Make This Conclusive 10-Day Test 

Fill the coupon and mail it today. Send no money. When 
Dave Minor’s play-by-ear piano course arrives just deposit 
$1.49 plus postage through postman. There is nothing more 
to pay. Inspect your course carefully, see how simple yet 
thorough it is. Follow it for ten days. Then, if you aren’t 
actually playing the piano and playing it well, if you aren t 
entirely satisfied and delighted with your discovery, return 
the course and get your money back. Piano playing is more 
popular than ever. DON’T WAIT BUT WRITE TODAY! 
If you act now you will receive (without extra cost) the 
wonderful, big, 72-page Dave Minor piano song book of 50 
songs you quickly learn to play the Dave Minor play-by-ear 
method or money back. Get in on this 2 FOR 1 OFFER 
NOW, because it may be withdrawn at any time due to 
present conditions. 


FOR COMPLETE 
COURSE OF HOME 
INSTRUCTION £ 
SO SONG BOOK 


■ MAIL THIS COUPON 


DAVE MINOR 


Room 1-D 230 East Ohio Street 

CHICAGO 11, ILLINOIS 


DAVE MINOR, Room i-D 
230 East Ohio St., Chicago 11, Ill. 


Send your complete “Play-by-Ear” Course of 25 lessons. Also 
72-page Piano Song Book at no additional cost. I’ll pay $1.49 
plus C.O.D. postage on arrival on your positive guarantee I 
may return course in 10 days for full refund. (Send $1.49 with 
order and Dave Minor pays postage.) 


Name.. 
Address. 


City. 


.Zone. 


. State. 


THIS EASY WAY 
T EACHES PIANO 


23 



























To make with the mouth you must make sure tooth¬ 
brush technique is trusty—make-up is true to your 
type. Any lip-line changes must be within belief. 



Come, come, keep your chin up! And keep track of 
the neck beneath it. A soft, smooth throat encour¬ 
ages the easy erectness of Jane's posture-poise. 



Easy does it for that easy-on-the-eyes expression. 
Brows should follow their natural bent; so take out 
only the straggling few to leave an alluring arch. 



You say you want your eyes to speak volumes. You 
worry about the way you smile. Now that you’ve seen 
Howard Hughes’ “The Outlaw” two or three times you 
admit you’d like to act like Russell. (We’ll skip over 
that wailing about wanting to look like the beauteous 
Jane!) So, we say to the luscious lady herself, “How 
do you get that way? Is it an act?” And Jane, being 
the frank and delightful person she is, explains all. 

We quote—"An actress must think and feel her part. 
That isn’t quite the same thing as ‘putting on an act.’ 
I’d say complete unselfconsciousness is the answer.” 

Every emotion and every bit of individuality is 
created by the eyes, the mouth, the hands and the way 
the body moves. Before Jane’s eyes receive their 
beguiling bit of eyeshadow, pencil and mascara they 
are treated to eight solid hours of sleep. 

Her dentist does his part and she does hers (with 
dentifrice and mouthwash) to make sudden quick 
smiles sweeter. Exercise and correct eating habits 
create vibrant vitality and motions of effortless ease. . . 
An act in four acts, maybe? 



Winning, hands down! But down with a difference. 
Jane shakes hers vigorously and frequently to rest 
and relax them. It leads to the gesture graceful. 








D OOMED to the life of a harem girl, beautiful Maryam begged to be saved. 

And Walter of Gurney, surrounded by bloodthirsty Mongolian guards 
armed with hatred and vicious spears, risked torture and death to free this 
piteous stranger. Was it pity? Was it passion? Was it love? Why did he marry 
Maryam when his solemn vow pledged him to aristocratic, desirable Engaine? 

If you read for sheer entertainment, you will be carried away by the thrilling, 
touching love story in "The Black Rose.” If you seek adventure, your blood will 
race as you travel the hazardous spice-trails of a baked and wind-blown desert — 
as you revel in the opulence of a fabulous Oriental palace. 

Here is a historical romance that magically transports you to the panoramic 
scenes of grandeur, love, and danger of a never-to-be-forgotten age. Over 800,000 
readers are already acclaiming Thomas Costain’s sensational new novel as the 
finest they have read in years! And now, though it is selling by the thousands 
in the publisher’s edition at $3.00 retail, you can obtain your copy absolutely 
FREE, as explained below. 


TO NEW MEMBERS OF THE LITERARY GUILD BOOK CLUB 


by THOMAS COSTAIN 


was it 


was it 


was it 


Love? 
'Passion? 


WHY DID HE RISK HIS LIFE TO SAVE THIS STRANGER—THIS HAREM GIRL? 


Guild Membership Costs Nothing 

Literary Guild membership is free—there are no 
dues or fees. Each month you will receive your 
copy of "Wings,” the Guild's illustrated book- 
review Brochure, which contains articles about the 
Literary Guild selection to be published the fol¬ 
lowing month. From these articles you decide 
whether or not you care to receive the Guild book 
described. If not, you simply return the form sup¬ 
plied and no book will be sent to you that month. 
If, however, the selection is one you don't want to 
miss, it will be sent to you on publication date. 

Save Up To 50% On New Books 

Literary Guild books are selected by our Edi¬ 
torial Staff from proofs submitted by leading 
publishers long in advance of their publication 
date. Because the Literary Guild is the largest 
book club in the world, a huge special edition is 
printed at a tremendous saving in cost. This 
saving is passed on to members. The Literary 
Guild edition is manufactured at the same time as 
the publisher’s edition, yet Guild members pay a 
flat price of only $2.00 for each Guild book 
accepted, instead of the higher price of the same 
book sold at retail in the publisher's edition. 

"Collector's Library" Bonus Books Free 

In addition. Guild members receive a beautifully 
printed, handsomely bound copy of one of the 
Collector's Library volumes—heretofore available 
only in a limited edition at $10 per copy — as a 
bonus for every four Guild books purchased! To 
be a "member in good standing" merely requires 
that you accept a minimum of only four Guild 
books a year out of the 12 or more new and 
important fiction and non-fiction Guild books 
submitted as they are published. 


Send No Money — Mail Coupon NOW 

The convenience, the enjoyment, and the saving 
of about 50% of your book money will, we hope, 
prompt you to become a member of the Literary 
Guild at once. As a special inducement for joining 
now instead of "later” you will be sent — FREE — 
a copy of "The Black Rose,” which is being sold 
currently in the publisher’s edition at $3.00. As 
a new member you can now buy any of the fol¬ 
lowing recent Guild selections for only $2.00 each. 

"The King's General," By Daphne du Maurier 
A love story that takes its place among the roman¬ 
tic classics of all time. By the author of "Rebecca," 
"Hungry Hill,” etc. First printing, 825,000 copies. 
Publisher’s price, $2.75. 

"So Well Remembered," By James Hilton 
She wrecked the lives of two husbands — one of 
whom was too good to her! And almost shattered 
her son’s romance! Publisher's price, $2.50. 

"The Gauntlet," By James Street 

Was it wrong for these servants of God to live and 

love like other human beings? Publisher's price, 

$2.75. 

"Three O'clock Dinner," By Josephine Pinckney 
The story of jealousies, passions, hatreds and loves 
that exploded at a typical three o’clock “family 
dinner." Publisher's price, $2.50. 

Because of production limitations the number 
of new members the Guild can service is restricted. 
By joining now your new membership can be 
accepted at once, and you will be guaranteed 
against any price increase on Guild selections for 
a year. MAIL COUPON NOW. 

LITERARY GUILD OF AMERICA, INC., 

Publishers, Garden City, N. Y. 


Mail This 
I Coupon 

! FREE: THE BLACK ROSE 

Literary Guild of America, Inc., Publishers 
Dept.4HWG,Garden City, N. Y. 

Please enroll me as a subscriber of the 
Literary Guild and send me "The Black 
Rose” absolutely FREE. I am also to re¬ 
ceive free each month the Guild Brochure, 
"Wings,” and all other membership privi¬ 
leges, including bonus books. In considera¬ 
tion of diis, I agree to purchase a minimum 
of foui^elections of my choice at only 
| $2.00 each (regardless of higher retail 

■ prices of the publisher’s edition) within 

■ a year. 

(If you wish, you may have as your first 
selection any one of the following books 
I for only $2.00. Just check the box preced- 

■ ing the title.) 

□ The King’s General □ The Gauntlet 

□ So Well Remembered □ Three O'clock Dinner 

' Mr. 

Mrs. 

• Miss (Please Print) 

Street and No. 

I Zone No. 

City . (if any).. State _ 

Age, if 

Occupation.Under 21. 

f Price in Canada, $2.20; 105 Bond St., Toronto 2, Can. 

I-— 1 


25 












i V " 4RNR&9) T * • 


THIS GIRL...! 

Breathtaking in the wonder 


of her loveliness! 


THIS PICTURE...! 

Glamorous in the magic of 


its songs, stars, story 








I DIDNT MEAN 
A WORD I SAID" 
by Jimmy McHugh 
and Harold Adamson 


MOONLIGHT 
=>ROPAGANDA" 
by Herbert Magidson 
and Matty Molneck 


with 

REGINALD GARDINER • RICHARD GAINES- STANLEY PRAGER 

and HARRY JAMES’ MUSIC MAKERS 

Directed by GREGORY RATOFF • Produced by GEORGE JESSEL 

Screen Play by Robert Ellis and Helen Logan • Based on a Story by Bert Granet 
Dances Staged by Seymour Felix 


DO YOU LOVE ME 
by Harry Ruby 


20 , 

CENTURY-FOX 

PICTURE 


AS IF I DIDN'T HAVE 
ENOUGH ON MY MIND" 
by Horry James, Lionel 
Newman and Charles 
Henderson 


26 




rnammmmtammUM 































Editor Doris Cline was a news¬ 
paper gal (San Francisco Chron¬ 
icle, U. P. correspondent, etc.) un¬ 
til coming to N. Y. 4 years ago. 



Helen Limke, Movieland's Holly¬ 
wood "chief," formerly program 
log editor at NBC; an alumnus, 
too, of the Edgar Bergen staff. 


MEET THE PEOPLE 


Dear Readers: 

To our modesty-bred astonishment, we’ve been getting 
stacks of mail from fans wanting “to see and know the 
Stars Behind the Stars.” (Honest, that’s what they call 
us!) Mrs. Isabel Greenwald, for example, writes from 
Davenport, Iowa: “Wish we could have pictures of the edi¬ 
tors in your magazine sometime . . . and the writers, too.” 

So here we are .. . the cooks come out of the kitchen and 
sitting up front with the customers! 

But now that we’re talking things over in this friendly 
fan-to-fan sort of way, are there any other special re¬ 
quests? Would you like us to continue this page—with 
pictures of the writers and contributors? Shall we make 
MEET THE PEOPLE a regular feature, and give you a 
chance to meet “all the people?” Let’s be democratic about 
it, then; we’ll take a vote. And when you write, perhaps 
you’ll enclose one of your own photos. Aw please? 

Sincerely, 

Doris Cline, Editor 



Peg Nichol* ha* glamoriied *feel 
plant open hearth* and furnaces 
for the Weirton (W.Va.) Bulletin; 
ihe wa* the camerawoman-editor. 



Frances Dick assisted society 
columnist "Cholly Knickerbocker 
for a time, was later at Viking 
Press and Limited Editions Club. 



Darlyne Mclnnes is pretty enough 
to be in movies; studies drama in 
spare time, but keeps Movieland's 
Hollywood office routine humming. 

Photos of Miss Cline, Miss Nichols 
and Miss Dick are by M. Dosser, N.Y. 


27 



Painted from lift by Andrew loo mu 


Starring 

JANE LOUIS 

RUSSELL HAYWARD 


*The World’s Most 
Exciting Brunette 

JANE RUSSELL 

So thrillingly alive — she couldn't 
live without love! So breathlessly 
beautiful —she couldn't escape 
from men! So tensely dramatic 




you’ll always remember her—and 
this great new hit! 


with FAITH DOMERGUE • KENT TAYLOR 
MARIE WILSON • CONNIE GILCHRIST 

ond 

PENNY SINGLETON 


Produced by 


Directed by Edwin L. Marin fefeo*ed thru Unitvd Artitti 


HUNT STROMBERG 


Loo Gormov A.S.C. Director of Photography 
Screenplay by Richard Macoulay and 
Margaret hue II Wilder 
Additional Dialogue by 
Ruth Nordh 


28 



JOAN FONTAINE 


v 



Charles Boyer discusses his French Research 
Foundation with Joan and sculptor Jo David¬ 
son. (Right) Mark Stevens kisses his bride in 
"From This Day Forward," war problem story. 


By JDI LUNT 


“If everything they say about me is true, I’m the 
wickedest wench in Hollywood!” 

Joan Fontaine said that to me. 

She said it as she put red fingernail polish on her nails. 
We were chatting in her dressing room. The room was 
lined with white satin, all femininely intimate. 

“What a Hell-raiser I’ve been!” she exclaimed. “I’ve 
feuded with every leading man I’ve ever had. I’ve 
fought and clawed with my sister. I’ve tried to under¬ 
mine my directors. Why . . .” (Continued on page 70) 





Richard Crane likes swimming, skiing and boxing. Admits ruefully that he exercises to fight 
weight. Secretly hopes to stump "Information Please" experts—someday! 


30 







V 

' 

By ADELAIDE CURRAN 




THE KID 
FROM INDIANA 


Stop the presses! In “Johnny Comes Flying 
Home” Richard Crane enacts the role of an erst¬ 
while test pilot who is grounded. His depth per¬ 
ception is out of focus, it says in the script, and 
besides that—he blacks out in a four-motored 
crisis. Or even when faced with a single engine 
dilemma, if you’re going to get technical. Comes 
the time when a dubious ship is to be tested. Dick, 
the noble character, tricks his friend—who is sup¬ 
posed to take up the shaky (Continued on page 60) 


"Richard, the lion hearted” ... 
at last, he has a script which 

lets him live to tell the tale! 



Little Theatre alumnus. Above, with Vera-Ellen. 



31 



































By ALICE L. TILDESLEY 



Rhonda Fleming, signed for movies without a test 







That she'll be typed by "same roles"? Not a 
chance! Rhonda has proved her versatility. 


◄' 


“Who is THAT?” murmur theater goers, as Rhonda Flem¬ 
ing reaches the climax of her portrayal of the neurotic “patient” in 
“Spellbound.” 

Months before she startled the public from the screen, boys 
in hospitals throughout the country were asking: “Who is That?” 
at sight of the tall, slender girl with flaming hair and green eyes, 
who toured veterans’ wards, visiting those wounded and hurt in 
the war. 

When doctors and nurses asked her to go into mental wards, 
Rhonda always said “Yes.” Other glamour girls have confessed 
that mental cases scare them to death, they don’t know what to do 
when a patient loses control, they can’t get out fast enough!—but 
Rhonda, who is easily terrified of producers and directors, was 
never afraid of the unfortunate. 

“Just talk naturally to them, and don’t notice when they get 
off the track,” she was advised. “More than any patient in the 
hospital, these men need normal visitors.” 

The boys were all right at first; they’d talk about their home 
towns show her their snapshots, discuss their favorite pictures, 
just as if the beautiful redhead had been an old schoolmate. Then, 
suddenly, they’d slip off into their own particular brand of de¬ 
lusion; . . . surprised, crafty, wary—and then that gleam in the 
eye. You know how it is, if you’ve seen Rhonda’s performance in 
“Spellbound,” for you have it there to the life. 

“Go right on talking,” the nurses had told her, and Rhonda did 
so, sitting by the patient’s bed, as casual and chatty as if she 
were not feeling inside like Beauty in Distress. 

Rhonda didn’t know, when she was progressing sympathetically • 
from ward to ward, that she’d ever be cast in a film about psy¬ 
chiatry; she wasn’t aware that she was (Continued on page 84) 



Her mother was actress Effie Graham. Above, Small but dynamic role in "Spellbound" marked Red-haired Rhonda likes to sing: may do a 
"Spiral Staircase" (RKO), with Gordon Oliver. her debut and first professional appearance. musical. In "Abilene" (UA), with L. Bridges. 




33 











An avalanche of shorthand notes poured in when fans discovered he had taken a secretarial course. 

Van answered them in Gregg. Since dating Sonja Henie, many letters beg him not to wed. 


34 










Van Johnson is an American institution. The records 
prove it. While there’s no actual fan mail count 
(security reasons, no doubt), it is accepted that those 
sacks and sacks of mail marked “V.J.” double after 
each Van Johnson picture. 

The billets-doux of devotion vary: A High School 
girl hopes Van will go bicycling with her. She’ll supply 
the picnic lunch, he can bring movie books. “Then 
we can talk and eat,” she states. A G.I. from the 
Pacific mourns that his best girl sends him daily V-Mail 
notes—about Van Johnson! “Do me a favor,” he 
writes. “She’s not dangerous; she’s just been bitten 
by the Johnson bug. I’d appreciate it if you’d send 
her a picture of yourself.” 

From problem letters to a recipe for Aunt Minnie’s 
apple pie (sent under separate cover), Van tries to read 
every letter he gets. 


Tan 

Mail 

Cookies, candy and cake are evidence 
of fan interest; thank-you notes go to 
donors, who are usually of school age. 


Busy between takes, at lunch, reading his 
fan mail. Next pic, "No Leave, No Love, 
with British actress (above) Pat Kirkwood. 


Numerous requests to be judge 
of contests are turned down; he 
won't do one without doing all. 


35 







Vivian Blaine’s favorite number, either to 
sing or listen to, is “All The Things You Are.” 
If you remember the lyrics, they somehow fit 
the girl who started to work with bands when 
she should have been studying her algebra. 

Not that she didn’t triumph in algebra, be¬ 
cause she did. However, she had found notes to 
be far more inspiring than quadratic equations, 
and her mother—always tender, always under¬ 
standing—said simply, “I think you have a 
great gift. I think you should begin to cultivate 
it as soon as possible.” 

During her early days as vocalist with a band, 
Vivian wore tailored dresses or suits. Came the 
great day when the band decided to go elegant; 
the men were to wear dinner clothes, and Viv¬ 
ia